#1
Next year i'm hoping to start a project of making myself a custom guitar and I would like to fit a killswitch to it, but i was wondering if i could use one of those cool buttons used on arcade machines. The reason I am concerned about them is surely when the button is pressed down power flows through which tells the arcade cab that that button is being pressed, so surely would't this mean sound would only come through when the button is pressed down rather than killing the sound when the button is pressed
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#3
I didn't ask "do you think this will look good?" I asked "will it work?"
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#5
There are button-style killswitches that aren't arcade buttons. You'd have to put one in the circut and see what it does maybe. You should also make sure the button is a good size and the color fits with the guitar.

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#6
mit ebe tricky to wire but if u can get it rite it seems like it shud work. and what are u talking about that sounds like itll look badass. pictures when u finish it next year for sure.
#7
i dont think thats how buttons work. Im pretty sure they dont send out an electrical signal ,because they are just buttons. They interupt the flow of a signal path and thats how a machine knows if its being pressed. if im right it would work perfect for your guitar.
#8
Just googled arcade buttons, and they look like they will work!

I made one with a cheap button from Maplins and it looks very similiar to that of the arcade button.

Though it looks like you would have to route out a fair bit. there quite big!
Last edited by Amitio at Sep 30, 2008,
#9
i think buckethead has used push button killswitches, i'm pretty sure the first time i ever heard/saw jordynn (sp?) he was using a push button one. I'm not sure how to wire it, but what if when you pressed it, it sent the whole signal to a volume pot permanently set at zero? it could even be internal, that way you're never actually cutting the signal, just sending it to a place with no output..... only theoritical though, i don't really know anything of electronics...
#10
Quote by zzpot21
i dont think thats how buttons work. Im pretty sure they dont send out an electrical signal ,because they are just buttons. They interupt the flow of a signal path and thats how a machine knows if its being pressed. if im right it would work perfect for your guitar.
You have a very good point there i'm pretty sure it will work as a kill switch then. I'll have to test one out with my crappy strat copy before I put it in my plan.
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#11
it needs to be a momentary switch, it doesnt matter what it looks like it matters what it does. thats what you need to know.
#13
Well on the site selling arcade buttons, some say momentary so I guess those ones can be used.
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#14
You would have to get a button that is either always on, or has 3 lugs. The button you would probably find is the 3 lug, i think i used to have one actually.

Just run the hot throught the always on section of it, and then when you press the button the signal gets cut.

Hope this turns out ok ^^
#15
Quote by Les Paul57
actually this seems like it wud be way more epic

"that was easy"
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#16
Quote by mightmuffin
"that was easy"

lmao but a guitar with one of those wud be awesome. and when u cut out it says it
#17
Quote by Les Paul57
lmao but a guitar with one of those wud be awesome. and when u cut out it says it

Haha jordan but with one of those "Th-th-th-th-thhh-th-thhh that was easy"
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#19
Quote by Mecler
There was a guy awhile ago who built an awesome Parker Fly copy named Black/White. He used an arcade button.

One of my favorite builds so far.

http://ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=657407&page=1&pp=40&highlight=black%2Fwhite+fly
Wow that looks awesome best build i've seen on UG. So now I know the arcade button killswitch is definately posible then sweet
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#20
Yeah, the point lies in the switch connections. If it's a button (which it is in your case), you're going to want to get a momentary on button. If it's not momentary, of you press it once, it will mute the sound till you press it again. If it's not "on," it will mute your guitar unless you press it. If you already have a button, you can check this with a multimeter's continuity function to see how the contacts connect. Most likely though, it will be a momentary off button, or at least that would be my guess. If that is the case you're going to have to buy a different button somewhere.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#22
Yeah, you can use an arcade button. I have an arcade machine and its buttons are normally-open 'leaf switches' (just 2 peices of metal that get pushed together by the button).

So yeah, just connect the hot to one leaf and the gnd to the other. When you push the button, it'll ground the signal, juat like a killswitch.

The catch, however, is that the leaves of the switch are quite long, and the button requires quite a bit of depth. It may or may not fit.

Pics if you want, so you can see what I mean.
#24
Quote by Invader Jim

The catch, however, is that the leaves of the switch are quite long, and the button requires quite a bit of depth. It may or may not fit.


The lugs shouldn't be a problem as you can cut the majority of them off with a hacksaw if needed. The body will be a different story, though.
Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser Deluxe
Boss DS-1
Crate GTD65

GAS List:
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster
#25
Quote by Invader Jim
Yeah, you can use an arcade button. I have an arcade machine and its buttons are normally-open 'leaf switches' (just 2 peices of metal that get pushed together by the button).

So yeah, just connect the hot to one leaf and the gnd to the other. When you push the button, it'll ground the signal, juat like a killswitch.

The catch, however, is that the leaves of the switch are quite long, and the button requires quite a bit of depth. It may or may not fit.

Pics if you want, so you can see what I mean.


That's exactly what I was going to say.

It should be a momentary-ON switch, in which case you use it to momentarily engage a circuit that grounds the signal from the pickup.