#1
I wanted to have a go at songwriting and came up with this chord progression idea in the Key of G with simple, newbie strumming - you can hear the audio in my profile titled 'Chord Progression for Song in G'

The progression can be broken down as follows:

Verse: G-D & G-D-C-D (hear this on the audio from the start to about 20 seconds in)

Chorus: Em-Am & finishing with Em-Am-C (on audio from 21 secs to 30 seconds)

Bridge or Instrumental Break: D-Bm & finishing with D-Bm-Am9 (on audio from 31 secs to 41 seconds)

Does that look OK?

I haven't a clue how to put lyrics to that though, in particular where in relation to the chord changes should the lyrics go?

Thanks for any advice... there are probably some other questions i should be asking that i haven't thought of yet.
#2
Check out the songwriting and lyrics forum for help with lyrics.
I didn't get a chance to listen, but it sounds like you've got your parts fine, you can easily make a simple song out of three parts.
#3
you got to play it over and over and listen to it. See if you can hear a melody and start to hum the melody. Slowly start adding words that seem to fit the feeling of the song. Use a recording device or write out the words as you get them and just keep growing them into the song as you play it.
Si
#4
Once you have the melody, then try writing a melody over the top of the chords, something that expresses what the song is trying to show. It also sounds cool to highlight the chord tones in your melody.
Then once you have the basics you could try adding some lead guitar fills or a solo section, a bass guitar part playing the root notes of the chords. Maybe some drums providing a rhythmic backbeat?
Hell, you could add a symphony orchestra if you wanted! Be creative
#5
Quote by geetarmanic
I wanted to have a go at songwriting and came up with this chord progression idea in the Key of G with simple, newbie strumming - you can hear the audio in my profile titled 'Chord Progression for Song in G'

The progression can be broken down as follows:

Verse: G-D & G-D-C-D (hear this on the audio from the start to about 20 seconds in)

Chorus: Em-Am & finishing with Em-Am-C (on audio from 21 secs to 30 seconds)

Bridge or Instrumental Break: D-Bm & finishing with D-Bm-Am9 (on audio from 31 secs to 41 seconds)

Does that look OK?

I haven't a clue how to put lyrics to that though, in particular where in relation to the chord changes should the lyrics go?

Thanks for any advice... there are probably some other questions i should be asking that i haven't thought of yet.


The answer to your questions can really only be answered by you. Its your music, you're the artist. If you can't answer those questions, it's quite possible that you shouldn't be writing yet due to lack of experience as a musician.

Try spending some time listening to and learning music. Analyze what the songs are doing. Look at things like form (intro - verse - chorus....ect). Learn the key/chord progression. Learn how to play the music. Learn what it feels like to play the music. In other words..... get some more experience.

I would suggest that you build up a repertoire of music that you can play well, and understand. You will get to the point where you don't have to ask someone else how to write your material. You'll know what you want to do, and you'll be able to do it because you will have the experience and knowledge necessary to create your own works of art.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 1, 2008,
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
The answer to your questions can really only be answered by you. Its your music, you're the artist. If you can't answer those questions, it's quite possible that you shouldn't be writing yet due to lack of experience as a musician.

Try spending some time listening to and learning music. Analyze what the songs are doing. Look at things like form (intro - verse - chorus....ect). Learn the key/chord progression. Learn how to play the music. Learn what it feels like to play the music. In other words..... get some more experience.

I would suggest that you build up a repertoire of music that you can play well, and understand. You will get to the point where you don't have to ask someone else how to write your material. You'll know what you want to do, and you'll be able to do it because you will have the experience and knowledge necessary to create your own works of art.


+1

Some people will spend months (or years) mastering theory, and forget that the greatest judge of all is your own ear.