#1
I'm going to swallow my pride and admit I have a problem here.

Basically, I've "gone back" a little and am trying to develop my proficiency before my speed - I'd rather play slowly and smoothly than quickly and clumsily. I have two problems with my vibrato.

1) When I bend up to a note and then try to put vibrato on it while still holding it (ie solos), I end up wobbling the note out of tune.

2) I find it hard to put vibrato on a note on my high E string. I end up accidentally knocking the string off the edge of the fretboard.

Any tips to help me improve would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
Quote by plucky duck
arnt scandinavians all albino or am i mistaken? apologies if i am

Quote by cocodrilo83
logic is not always right
#2
1) I often have the same problem but have noticed I can add some vibrato to a bent note when I let the weight of the neck hold it. Sounds sort of odd but it's worked for me.

2) Try different hand placements, such as resting the far side of your palm on the bottom of the neck. Also use a light touch on the high E, be gentle.
#4
for the high E string try not to vibrato as u do on the other strings with an 'up and down' motion. try to bend it upwards only, then let it come down to its normal fretted position, and then up again.

as for executing bending vibratos... get a whammy bar perhaps? otherwise its a painful learning experience, especially if u already have a decent;y trained sense of pitch. u may hate yourself for trying to make it sound perfect straight away and failing.

just bend it up, then do maybe 2 crappy mini bends to it, then once u can get that, ad another mini bend, and another, until u have so many mini bends added onto it that it will eventually sound like a vibrato. (this is one of the harder techniques to master)
#5
I'll keep this in mind and work on it. Can't hurt to practice it more. Thanks for the tips.
Quote by plucky duck
arnt scandinavians all albino or am i mistaken? apologies if i am

Quote by cocodrilo83
logic is not always right
#6
Speed grows from accuracy. It's not so much going back as it is going the right way.
#7
Quote by Cathrag
1) When I bend up to a note and then try to put vibrato on it while still holding it (ie solos), I end up wobbling the note out of tune.


Unfortunately there is very little you can do practice this apart from use your ears an awful lot; you need to develop your ear to the point where you can hear that you're going out of tune and know when and how to correct yourself.

It'll take a lot of time and a huge amount of practice but it's worth it.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#8
Quote by Hadeed
for the high E string try not to vibrato as u do on the other strings with an 'up and down' motion. try to bend it upwards only, then let it come down to its normal fretted position, and then up again.


Good advice here. I had the same problem with vibrato on the high e string as well. I was either slipping off the bottom or banging into the b string too much. If nothing else your vibrato action here is going to be tighter than your other strings with less room to wiggle.

Most of this is just practice. If you have a song that uses these types of vibrato/notes, just keep working on it till your fingers bleed and you will see improvement over time.
#9
Quote by Cathrag


2) I find it hard to put vibrato on a note on my high E string. I end up accidentally knocking the string off the edge of the fretboard.

Try to only bend the "E" upwards, and then back down to normal position. This will make sure it doesn't go off the neck.

Have a look HERE for a great vibrato lesson.
My Last.fm
USA Fender Stratocaster | Roland Cube 60 | VOX ToneLab LE
#10
For your second problem. Instead of playing, lets say, the 12th fret on the high e, play the 17th fret on the b string. Ie, just play the exact same note but on another string. This is what the blues guys have been doing for years
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all
#11
Slow it down. Practice doing a vibrato on a single note consistantly without going out of tune or flying off the edge of the fretboard. I'm sure most of us have experienced similier problems learning vibrato; it's a tricky technique to apply properly.

+1 to those who have said you aren't "going back". It's a great practice to occasionally review things you think you've learned and correct them. It only re-enforces your ability and techniques.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play