#1
I'm stuck in a rut as far as my soloing/improv skills are concerned. I am looking for advice for what I should do next.

Basically all my solos sound the same. I have learned the minor pentatonic scales and know them like the back of my hand, however that's really all I use in my solos. I find out what key the song is in and then proceed from there using the according scale.

My question is where do I go from here? Are there other scales that anyone suggests I learn, and if so, how do I incorporate those with what I am already using. Or any other advice? Any input would be greatly appreciated!
#2
"I would suggest that you learn some Modes and other scales. "

Someone gave me that advice. I suggest working on phrasing.
Last edited by xHellbound at Oct 1, 2008,
#3
First, learn the major/minor scales! Depending on what you play, the harmonic minor is nice to know also. Also, what I do is consciously develop a bunch of techniques to throw into your stuff. For instance, incorporate open strings into a solo. If you come across a particularly catchy line, repeat it a little later on. Use two note harmonies in the scale, they can sound really cool. Arpeggiate the chords going on beneath your solo (and be aware of them all the time). Take a simple technique like a pinch harmonic or bend and accentuate it in a line. Experiment with timing, like going up a scale in 8ths, 16ths then triplet 16ths for instance. Vary the range you play in, but strategically. For instance, stay within a boundary by choosing a high or low note not to exceed, but when you feel a climax coming or something, go beyond it to kind of accentuate the line. I don't know, those things seem to help me.
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#4
Learn the Hexatonic (basically pentatonic with another note [2nd])
then the full minor.
Learn major scale.

Modes of the major scale
harmonic minor
melodic minor

And if you like, some non-western scales, I recommend the Kumoi scale... just amazing.
hue
#7
New scales won't help you, and you should ignore modes completely until you're familiar with the theory behind the major scale. The single most important skill for an improviser to have is well developed aural skill. Work on your ear training.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by Archeo Avis
New scales won't help you, and you should ignore modes completely until you're familiar with the theory behind the major scale. The single most important skill for an improviser to have is well developed aural skill. Work on your ear training.

Yeah they will! I find that in Minor Pentatonic I get stuck to similar patterns a lot, while in harmonic minor I come up with something original every time I jam. you just gotta find 'your' scale. And rhythm has to do a lot of it. If you use similar rhythmic patterns for your solos they gonna sound the same and you'll get traped again. get some drum machine software make up some beats and try to jam along.

or just get ****ed up, that's when I get most original
#9
Yeah they will! I find that in Minor Pentatonic I get stuck to similar patterns a lot


That's your fault, not the scale's. Plenty of guitarists compose original solos with the minor pentatonic.

while in harmonic minor I come up with something original every time I jam


It seems like you're impotent as an improviser outside of harmonic minor. I would not encourage the TS to dig himself into the same rut that you're in. I would strongly recommend that both of you develop your aural skills.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
That's your fault, not the scale's. Plenty of guitarists compose original solos with the minor pentatonic.

I never sad it's the scales fault. I can come up with shit I actually like, but it's not the scale for me.

Quote by Archeo Avis

It seems like you're impotent as an improviser outside of harmonic minor. I would not encourage the TS to dig himself into the same rut that you're in. I would strongly recommend that both of you develop your aural skills.

You think I only know two scales?! I just gave a ****in example. There are shit loads of scales and not everyone has to get stuck in major or whatever.
#11
To answer TS' question, try improving your phrasing. Chances are, your solos sound the same not because of the scale, but because of how you use the scale. I think there's some good articles here on UG. Check them out.
#12
Yeah work on phrasing there is a hell of alot you can do in those 5 notes, and as an aside after 5 years of playing i now know how to solo in both the minor and major pentatonic boxes, maybe in another 5 i'll get a mode or 2.
#13
uses space in your solos, make a statement, let the audience digest it then make another statement, you can say just as much when your not playing then when you are playing, also use varying dynamics, and don't just play fast, incorperate different note speeds, another thing you could do is switch up the octaves. hope that helps