#1
Now, I know that there are a bunch of lessons for writing your own songs. Here's my dilema, I have tried and succeeded in bring my chops up to a fast level. When I write my own riffs and things like that, it seems like I am stuck, literally stuck in C major, and D minor, and I sometimes venture out of the scales and the theory that I know, and that never gets me a good sound, so I stick to the theory.

My question is; what should I do about writing a song of my own? I'm prefectly fine with working in D minor, I love that set of notes ( haha ) and working with it is fine, but how should I put it all together? Tempo, sections, transitions, fills all that? Any advice?
#2
create music in your head - play it on the guitar - write it down / record it

that's one way.

then another would be:
pick up the guitar - improvise - write down / record good parts.

and another: write whatever happens to be written randomly - have a shit song. ftw : D

nah but really, improvise in scales different than those 2. that will help you lots.
#3
Quote by RCalisto
create music in your head - play it on the guitar - write it down / record it

that's one way.

then another would be:
pick up the guitar - improvise - write down / record good parts.

and another: write whatever happens to be written randomly - have a shit song. ftw : D

nah but really, improvise in scales different than those 2. that will help you lots.


Haha thanks. So like, say the rhythm would be most chords, chords that perhaps share the root note of the riff over them? Something like that for a whole riff or measure.
#4
going out of your comfort zone will help, i find that if i right something down using a paritcular scale in a certain key then trying to play what youve written down then tweak and record whatever you may have liked about it. even if its not something that you usualy do, this will help with improv. right now im struggling with trying to get out of one position and move across the fretboard more, but as it turns out its a lot harder than i thought. Oh i forgot to ask what genre of music are we talking about, im into metal and classical stuff and i like shred, so my writing style may work for that but i dont know about you.
#6
Well, it seems like you like metalcore (I saw A7X and BFMV in your profile), so I'll give you tips for that. I'll assume you're in Drop D (Or any dropped tuning).

Use a pedal tone (repeated note) on your low E (D?) string, whilst hitting notes on other strings, e.g. Unholy Confessions, Like Light To The Flies.

Learn to harmonize. Diatonic thirds are common are can add flavor to lead lines, e.g. Any Avenged Sevenfold song

Those are unique tips for metalcore.

Structure-wise, intro's are almost a must. Take examples from other songs, e.g:

Melodic-into-heavy-PM'd-Riff ALA Almost Easy by A7X.

Instant (or almost Instant) Intro ALA Like Light To The Flies by Trivium.

Lead guitar(s) joined by instruments ALA Sidewinder by A7X (Or Sweet Child O' Mine by GNR)

Drum Intro ALA Ain't Love Grand by Atreyu.

Bass Intro ALA The Wicked End by A7X.

Calm Intro ALA I Won't See You Tonight pt.1 by A7X, or Kirisute Gomen by Trivium.

There really is no limit to what you can do. From here, a verse-chorus-verse-chorus bridge format will work fine. Try to stay in a specific key (in your case, D Minor). Note that this are only guidelines to what you can play, and just to spark your creative muse. Try the tried-and-true method of taking a song, and changing the notes, drums, until you can't even remember what song it used to be.
#7
Quote by Austyn6661
Well, it seems like you like metalcore (I saw A7X and BFMV in your profile), so I'll give you tips for that. I'll assume you're in Drop D (Or any dropped tuning).

Use a pedal tone (repeated note) on your low E (D?) string, whilst hitting notes on other strings, e.g. Unholy Confessions, Like Light To The Flies.

Learn to harmonize. Diatonic thirds are common are can add flavor to lead lines, e.g. Any Avenged Sevenfold song

Those are unique tips for metalcore.

Structure-wise, intro's are almost a must. Take examples from other songs, e.g:

Melodic-into-heavy-PM'd-Riff ALA Almost Easy by A7X.

Instant (or almost Instant) Intro ALA Like Light To The Flies by Trivium.

Lead guitar(s) joined by instruments ALA Sidewinder by A7X (Or Sweet Child O' Mine by GNR)

Drum Intro ALA Ain't Love Grand by Atreyu.

Bass Intro ALA The Wicked End by A7X.

Calm Intro ALA I Won't See You Tonight pt.1 by A7X, or Kirisute Gomen by Trivium.

There really is no limit to what you can do. From here, a verse-chorus-verse-chorus bridge format will work fine. Try to stay in a specific key (in your case, D Minor). Note that this are only guidelines to what you can play, and just to spark your creative muse. Try the tried-and-true method of taking a song, and changing the notes, drums, until you can't even remember what song it used to be.


Dude. You help. I know how to harmonize and I do it frequenlty, in fact, in everyone song I've written since I learned how I use duel guitars like that of A7X, and I also use palm muted ( on dropped E ) pedal tones like you've said.

I suppose that I've used this all, and perhaps the only reason it isn't as impressive as I think it may be is because I put it in to Guitar Pro, I think I just need a solid, good jam session with my co-guitarist and we'll write some good stuff. But thanks a lot for taking the time man.
#8
Quote by Gizmo Factory
Dude. You help. I know how to harmonize and I do it frequenlty, in fact, in everyone song I've written since I learned how I use duel guitars like that of A7X, and I also use palm muted ( on dropped E ) pedal tones like you've said.

I suppose that I've used this all, and perhaps the only reason it isn't as impressive as I think it may be is because I put it in to Guitar Pro, I think I just need a solid, good jam session with my co-guitarist and we'll write some good stuff. But thanks a lot for taking the time man.


No problem. But, something I recently tried getting into was modulating keys (not modes) in the middle of a song (Blues scale-Harmonic Minor-Half Whole Diminished- F Major) and it really spiced up the whole song. If you've never tried it, it's great (when used tastefully) to make a song shine.

If you have any other questions, seek me out.

Cheers.
#9
Quote by Austyn6661
No problem. But, something I recently tried getting into was modulating keys (not modes) in the middle of a song (Blues scale-Harmonic Minor-Half Whole Diminished- F Major) and it really spiced up the whole song. If you've never tried it, it's great (when used tastefully) to make a song shine.

If you have any other questions, seek me out.

Cheers.


1.) What exactly do you mean by modulating key?

2.) If when creating a riff you simply use the notes of a a scale, say C major, ( C D E F G A B ) then dorian mode is like ( D E F G A B C ) and it's all the same notes then why do we use scales and modes as different names, can't they just be like C major set of notes? you know?
#10
Search up Metalcore on the UG columns(might be lessons, try that too) and theres a great lesson specific to harmonization. That is used alot to flavour lead lines in metalcore.
Metalcore riffs use the phrygian scale to add a certain brutality to the sound, but the chorus will often contain more melodic parts with clean vox.

Overall however, noone can really teach you to learn how to write a song, there are thousands of approaches. Dream Theater write amazing material through jamming. I cant do that so well, by best stuff comes out when I use a very systematic approach I invented.

All I can say is learn you theory, then write, write, write, be inspired and most of all have a good time doing it!
#11
Quote by Gizmo Factory
1.) What exactly do you mean by modulating key?

2.) If when creating a riff you simply use the notes of a a scale, say C major, ( C D E F G A B ) then dorian mode is like ( D E F G A B C ) and it's all the same notes then why do we use scales and modes as different names, can't they just be like C major set of notes? you know?


It only means that you change keys in the middle of a song (ala D Minor to D Half-Whole Diminished). It takes trial and error at the start to not sound like shit, but you'll get it.

And as for the second question, they are the same notes, but they resolve to a different note. Play something in C Major, then in A Minor. Same notes, but different sound. It's the intervals of each mode that give it its unique quality.

If you don't know what that means, then read The Crusade. I think it's the second article that explains intervals. Besides, modes are generally useless unless you're playing a two-chord vamp.

Which metalcore doesn't tend to do.