#1
Most of the tutorials I can find on the modes tend to explain it from the wrong angle for me. They usually have a certain scale, such as C major. Then they change chord progressions around that scale, which changes the mode.
I need to learn it from the opposite angle. What scale can I use to change the mode if the chord progression stays the same? Or if it's just a single chord?
I would like to record a "C 5 power chord" (root+5th) and change the scale that I play over it, to hear how the modes sound. Can I do this?


Thanks,
Chad
#3
You're not really playing with modes over a powerchord. Yes, you can outline the scale with it, but unless you play the Locrian mode as a b5 interval, you're really not "playing" the real modes over it (But it's acceptable to do).

You're supposed to use modes to create interesting harmonic connections, such as playing the #4 in Lydian over the IV chord.
#4
Yeah, but a good way to start with modes is playing the scale over the tonal center, it can show you the 'flavoured' notes
#5
Hey, I really appreciate the answers!
VIRUSDETECTED, I understand what you are saying, but I would just like to get an idea of the sounds and positions of the scales. I think that an overkill of information is making this complicated for me. I just really need to let my ear know what the different modes sound like, without having to think about a raised fourth or flat 5 etc. etc.

Myung-trucci, thanks for the video link! I just happened to be looking through my collection of guitar mags and found the issue with that video and TAB. Like I said....information overkill , I had the answer all along and didn't even know it. This site is great, thanks!


Chad
#6
The reason modes are different from a scale are because of the sharp fourths, the flat fifths, etc. You'll hear it better over a full chord, not a power chord. That's all I'm trying to say mate.

#8
I hope that I'm not jacking my own thread here but..........
I want to be able to associate the modes with a standard minor pattern..
----------|
E 0-00
B 00-0
G 0-0-
D 0-0-0
A 0-00
E 0-00
----------|

If I used the above pattern to base my modes from, just move that pattern to the correct fret or position, would this chart that I made correct?

E tonal center

C# minor = E Ionian
B minor = E Dorian
A minor = E Phrygian
G# minor = E Lydian
F# minor = E Mixolydian
E minor = E Aeolian
D# minor = E Locrian

I think that I could understand the modes better if I could use this approach.

Chad
#9
You are correct regarding switching between parallel modes over a static tonal center, but I would strongly recommend learning the theory behind the major scale and each mode so that you don't have to think like this...

C# minor = E Ionian
B minor = E Dorian
A minor = E Phrygian
G# minor = E Lydian
F# minor = E Mixolydian
E minor = E Aeolian
D# minor = E Locrian

That's a terribly inefficient way to view modes, and doesn't tell you anything about how they function, or why they sound the way they do. If you can't construct the major scale in every key, and play it all across the fretboard, you probably shouldn't be worrying about modes.
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