#1
Anyone know of a site that provides an index of different chord hierarchies in different scales and modes, etc?

It would really be helpful.
live to play live
#2
Do you mean chord diagrams? If so, this site is helpful.

Although I would highly recommend learning the fretboard notes and how to create these chords yourself.

Also, chords in modes will be the same as their relative major (G Mixolydian to C Ionian both have the same chords) so you really only need your major scale.
#4
Quote by ALittlesEnough
No, I mean chord hierarchies. Not chord shapes.

Eg. I II III IV V VI VII

chords don't have hierarchies.
#6
Quote by z4twenny
chords don't have hierarchies.


They do in tonal music.

Tonic (I) is most important, followed by dominant (V) and predominant (IV or ii). After that, vii(dim) is a dominant sub, and vi and iii are weak tonic substitutions or predominants.

Here's some rough charts that might help... I don't think that I totally agree with them, but they'll give you a rough idea of the hierarchy. I (which is at the bottom), is the most important, followed by V, then IV and ii, and so on.



(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#7
Quote by psychodelia
They do in tonal music.

Tonic (I) is most important, followed by dominant (V) and predominant (IV or ii). After that, vii(dim) is a dominant sub, and vi and iii are weak tonic substitutions or predominants.

Here's some rough charts that might help... I don't think that I totally agree with them, but they'll give you a rough idea of the hierarchy. I (which is at the bottom), is the most important, followed by V, then IV and ii, and so on.






................... (brain explodes)

Anyone care to explain that for everyone else? Like what is the point of that?
#8
Quote by psychodelia
They do in tonal music.

Tonic (I) is most important, followed by dominant (V) and predominant (IV or ii). After that, vii(dim) is a dominant sub, and vi and iii are weak tonic substitutions or predominants.

Here's some rough charts that might help... I don't think that I totally agree with them, but they'll give you a rough idea of the hierarchy. I (which is at the bottom), is the most important, followed by V, then IV and ii, and so on.





But in the first chart, what about broken cadences?

And that second chart hurts my brain, specially when I am trying to figure out why it writes iim, doesn't "ii" already mean it is minor, while "II" means it is major?
#9
Quote by gonzaw
But in the first chart, what about broken cadences?

And that second chart hurts my brain, specially when I am trying to figure out why it writes iim, doesn't "ii" already mean it is minor, while "II" means it is major?


By broken, I assume you mean the "deceptive" cadence, which I imagine is covered by the first V chord that goes to vi. vi is not the ultimate goal, anyway, so I guess this makes sense.

But, of course it isn't going to be perfect, and I didn't post the diagrams with the intent that they would be considered the supreme guide to Western tonal chord progressions... they just cover some of the basics. The second chart is a bit too busy, but I included it just to show that there are also other functions besides diatonic chords...

As for the iim, it's just being redundant, I suppose.

Quote by Guitarfreak777
................... (brain explodes)

Anyone care to explain that for everyone else? Like what is the point of that?


The point is to show the general directions of chord progressions in tonal music... the I (or tonic) is the ultimate goal, as evidenced by the fact that just about every progression ultimately leads to the tonic. The V (dominant) is the main tension that ultimately resolves to I, though other chords can bypass the dominant and go to I (it just isn't a particularly strong resolution). Predominant chords like IV and ii generally go to the dominant, and other chords go to these predominants, and so on and so forth.

You can (if you wish) use it as a map, and follow the arrows to see some possibilities of how people have put chord progressions together. This doesn't mean that these are the "Only" options, of course.

The second diagram is over the top, but I thought it was fun enough to include.
(Slightly outdated) Electronic and classical compositions by m'self: Check 'em out
#10
Quote by psychodelia
By broken, I assume you mean the "deceptive" cadence, which I imagine is covered by the first V chord that goes to vi. vi is not the ultimate goal, anyway, so I guess this makes sense.

But, of course it isn't going to be perfect, and I didn't post the diagrams with the intent that they would be considered the supreme guide to Western tonal chord progressions... they just cover some of the basics. The second chart is a bit too busy, but I included it just to show that there are also other functions besides diatonic chords...

As for the iim, it's just being redundant, I suppose.


The point is to show the general directions of chord progressions in tonal music... the I (or tonic) is the ultimate goal, as evidenced by the fact that just about every progression ultimately leads to the tonic. The V (dominant) is the main tension that ultimately resolves to I, though other chords can bypass the dominant and go to I (it just isn't a particularly strong resolution). Predominant chords like IV and ii generally go to the dominant, and other chords go to these predominants, and so on and so forth.

You can (if you wish) use it as a map, and follow the arrows to see some possibilities of how people have put chord progressions together. This doesn't mean that these are the "Only" options, of course.

The second diagram is over the top, but I thought it was fun enough to include.



Thanks
#11
Quote by psychodelia
By broken, I assume you mean the "deceptive" cadence, which I imagine is covered by the first V chord that goes to vi. vi is not the ultimate goal, anyway, so I guess this makes sense.

But, of course it isn't going to be perfect, and I didn't post the diagrams with the intent that they would be considered the supreme guide to Western tonal chord progressions... they just cover some of the basics. The second chart is a bit too busy, but I included it just to show that there are also other functions besides diatonic chords...

As for the iim, it's just being redundant, I suppose.


The point is to show the general directions of chord progressions in tonal music... the I (or tonic) is the ultimate goal, as evidenced by the fact that just about every progression ultimately leads to the tonic. The V (dominant) is the main tension that ultimately resolves to I, though other chords can bypass the dominant and go to I (it just isn't a particularly strong resolution). Predominant chords like IV and ii generally go to the dominant, and other chords go to these predominants, and so on and so forth.

You can (if you wish) use it as a map, and follow the arrows to see some possibilities of how people have put chord progressions together. This doesn't mean that these are the "Only" options, of course.

The second diagram is over the top, but I thought it was fun enough to include.


Yeah, I mean ones such as IV-vi or even ii-vi or ii-I (not really broken/deceptive) etc.
Well, I guess it is more like a guide...


The second chart is a big mess
I haven't even tried/learnt like 1/50 of all those progressions...
#12
Quote by z4twenny
chords don't have hierarchies.


If I wanted what you're implying, I would have said "chord's hierarchies". I said "chord hierarchies". The word chord refers to hierarchies, not vice versa.

Don't be a smartass.

Quote by nugiboy
I think he means what chord progressions go with what scales.

I use this http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_progressions.php


Thanks a lot man. Exactly what I was looking for.
live to play live