#1
okay here it is. i figured out how to solder by myself with a cheapo 30 watt one from radioshack. i was told for guitars, use 25-40 watts of power. so i bought that.

however, i was recently told that the skill is how long the lead is heated before it goes on any wires. i was also told that the type of lead matters also. like the core type. i just use the lead from the cheapo kit i bought. you think that's good enough? is this true?
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#2
It takes some practice to get good at it (so you dont burn out any components by heating them too long), but as long as you can do it pretty well you should be alright.


The type of flux (the stuff inside the solder) does matter, it helps to clean the contact to prep them to receive the flow of solder.
#3
typically there are two kinds. rosin cored, and silver solder. Someone correct me if im wrong. Both work about the same, but silver usually looks nicer, where the rosin core and flux helps the solder flow and makes the soldering easier.

Doesnt really matter. Itll all work. but your better off with some rosing core. There are some how to youtube videos on soldering which you might find helpful also. And 30 watts will work fine, its what i use. a lot of people may use 15-25 watts. But the 30 watts heats up quicker, and makes it easier to solder joints quicker. But if your working with components that can be a little sensitive, like the germanium transistors in the fuzz i made, you can damage the components.

but the resistors and capacitors arnt too sensitive so you should be ok
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#4
you dont even have to hold it on for very long either. the stuff usually melts pretty quickly. so you shouldnt hold it for more than 4-5 second really.
#5
^ To avoid damaging components via heat, use a heatsink. This can be any metal object clamped to the component you are soldering. The heat flows into the tool rather than the working part of the component.

In my electronics class we use hemostat clips, which I think are for surgery. Anyway, they work like a charm, and my transistors and such always stay cool.
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#6
Quote by ICANSEEYOU7687
typically there are two kinds. rosin cored, and silver solder. Someone correct me if im wrong. Both work about the same, but silver usually looks nicer, where the rosin core and flux helps the solder flow and makes the soldering easier.
okay.

Silver Solder is a whole different beast. it's used where strength is important. like radiator repairs. it has a very high melting temperature. you wouldn't use it for electrical work.


Lead/tin or the newer lead-free tin alloys are used for electrical work. most of the lead-free alloys are a little harder to work with.

about flux (core or paste):
Never use acid core solder. it's used for plumbing but will cause horrendous problems after months or years on electrical work. you want rosin (or ersin core)
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#7
^Not sure if you're referring to a different type of silver solder, but silver solder is definitely used in audio. A lot of boutique amp/pedal makers use it. The melting point seems reasonable, the stuff I used worked with a puny 15 watt iron.
#9
Silver solder? I use this for metal work with a brazing hearth. Wouldn't dream of using it on electronic stuff. The temperature it melts at is alot hotter than my soldering iron can go. But perhaps you are talking about a different thing...
#10
Silver solder used in electronics work is usually about 3% silver and the rest tin. Lead/tin solder is virtually extinct outside the US due to regulations involving the use of lead. Electronics silver solder is only a bit more expensive than the cheap stuff and is easy to work with.
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#11
I'm a plumber and we use solder with 2-10% silver to braze pipes. Has a VERY high melting point.
peter

Last edited by GOD on the 7th day
#12
Quote by pete_mack
I'm a plumber and we use solder with 2-10% silver to braze pipes. Has a VERY high melting point.


You aren't supposed to use that crap on electronics though.

I need to get a milder soldering iron. The one I have is evil, if you hold the trigger longer than 5 seconds the tip turns glowing red.
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#13
Quote by pete_mack
I'm a plumber and we use solder with 2-10% silver to braze pipes. Has a VERY high melting point.


What is the other 90-98% ? The silver is not the determinant of the melting point. As pointed out before, boutique electronics manufacturers all use silver solder for their work. And as I said, electronics silver solder is easy to use.
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#14
Just go with rosin, I think we'll all agree that that is the standard (or one of the standards for electronics) and will work. It's really not complicated, it's kinda when you get into pedal building and find eighty different types of resistors and don't know which to choose. And then you find out 99% of them will work.
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#16
Quote by Roc8995
^Not sure if you're referring to a different type of silver solder, but silver solder is definitely used in audio. A lot of boutique amp/pedal makers use it. The melting point seems reasonable, the stuff I used worked with a puny 15 watt iron.
we definitely are talking apples and orange here.

when i think of silver solder, i think of 50~66% silver.

i've been doing some reading on lead-free solders, and you're right. they are using a small percentage of silver in some of those alloys. kind of a bastardization for them to call that "silver solder", imho.

I still have a couple of spools of Kester 60/40.
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#17
haha. okay..
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#18
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I still have a couple of spools of Kester 60/40.


Still one of the best to work with. Don't forget to ventilate your work area with it though.
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#19
Quote by Vulcan
Silver solder used in electronics work is usually about 3% silver and the rest tin. Lead/tin solder is virtually extinct outside the US due to regulations involving the use of lead. Electronics silver solder is only a bit more expensive than the cheap stuff and is easy to work with.


No dude. Electronics silver solder has a high percentage of silver otherwise the melting point is fricking high.
Lead solder extinct?? Nigga ple. I use it at work everyday as does my friend who works in electronics.
peter

Last edited by GOD on the 7th day
#20
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
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#21
Quote by pete_mack
No dude. Electronics silver solder has a high percentage of silver otherwise the melting point is fricking high.
Lead solder extinct?? Nigga ple. I use it at work everyday as does my friend who works in electronics.


You're wrong about the silver content.

You're also wrong about lead solder everywhere but where you happen to live.
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#22
Quote by Vulcan
You're wrong about the silver content.

You're also wrong about lead solder everywhere but where you happen to live.


This is what I do for a living. There are 2 substances for joining copper pipe (which is the primary tube used for water) one being silver and other lead. I've worked overseas and lead is still highly used.

Prove me wrong.

Stop talking out your ass. Sounds retarded and smells funny.
peter

Last edited by GOD on the 7th day
#23
Quote by pete_mack
This is what I do for a living. There are 2 substances for joining copper pipe (which is the primary tube used for water) one being silver and other lead. I've worked overseas and lead is still highly used.

Prove me wrong.

Stop talking out your ass. Sounds retarded and smells funny.


Hmm. We're not talking about pipe, here, regardless of what you do for a living. Lead has been, or is in the process of being phased out, depending on jurisdiction. Plenty of people in the trades use whatever the hell they're used to, regulations be damned. BTW, lead solder for pipes has been banned here, and also in many other places. Lead electronics solder is still available - for now.

This is as good a link as any other.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restriction_of_Hazardous_Substances_Directive
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#24
Quote by Vulcan
Lead/tin solder is virtually extinct outside the US due to regulations involving the use of lead.

Not true!

*Evil Laughter*

Or, well it might be true, but not in the one country where I live.
Forgive me for a random pointless comment.
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#25
Quote by Vulcan
Hmm. We're not talking about pipe, here, regardless of what you do for a living. Lead has been, or is in the process of being phased out, depending on jurisdiction. Plenty of people in the trades use whatever the hell they're used to, regulations be damned. BTW, lead solder for pipes has been banned here, and also in many other places. Lead electronics solder is still available - for now.

This is as good a link as any other.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Restriction_of_Hazardous_Substances_Directive


If you read the link you posted, you would have read that:

a) it only deals with Asia and USA,
b) no one is banning lead based solders,
c) they are merely looking at minimising the use of lead based solders in a few situations,
d) there is NOTHING about use of lead in plumbing.

Tradesman don't "use whatever the hell they're used to, regulations be damned."
Trust me, we work under standards and codes which are adhered to otherwise fines are issued and the work has be undertaken again - which is a big deal.

I am not sure about Canadian codes on solder in pipework, but please show me somewhere where it states lead based solder is banned in plumbing and electronics.
peter

Last edited by GOD on the 7th day
#26
Quote by pete_mack
If you read the link you posted, you would have read that:

a) it only deals with Asia and USA,
b) no one is banning lead based solders,
c) they are merely looking at minimising the use of lead based solders in a few situations,
d) there is NOTHING about use of lead in plumbing.

Tradesman don't "use whatever the hell they're used to, regulations be damned."
Trust me, we work under standards and codes which are adhered to otherwise fines are issued and the work has be undertaken again - which is a big deal.

I am not sure about Canadian codes on solder in pipework, but please show me somewhere where it states lead based solder is banned in plumbing and electronics.



Had you read it, and maybe done some follow-up, you would have caught the first part dealing with the EU, then perhaps you would have stumbled on this, which will give you further information (dig around on this one, maybe Google some more). Since 2006, electronics goods have been required to be lead-free due to the recycling directives.
http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/weee/index_en.htm

Perhaps you would even find this from your own back yard;
http://www.lead.org.au/lanv8n1/l8v1-11.html

It seems lead-free plumbing solder has been mandated for potable water in your country almost as long as most others (1986 in the USA and Canada). Maybe you should check to see what's in your toolbox? Dig some more, and you'll find that most of the (developed) world has long ago banned lead solder for use on potable water plumbing.

Please do some research. While you have already gotten personal in this thread, I will refrain from doing so, and since this thread has digressed considerably from the original question, I consider it finished. And for anyone who wants an easy read regarding soldering, this page contains some good information and further reference links;

http://www.logwell.com/tech/servtips/solder.html
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Last edited by Vulcan at Oct 6, 2008,