#1
Does anybody know of any good legato exercises to start with? I'm not that good at it yet. For example this one is slightly too hard:

Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
Well a good place to start is trilling. Get the metronome out and practice each set of fingers for about a minute to begin with. Its important that you get your fingers up to a point where they are not tense and you are keeping time but with effort. You will feel your fingers getting tired this way. Tensing up doesnt help, and trying to play too fast doesnt help. Focus on each set of fingers ie. 1 2, 1 3 , 1 4, 2 3, 2 4, 3 4

Next excercises. Practice these 2 patterns on your high e string.. 12 9 10 12 10 9 and 12 9 11 12 11 9. Use fingers 1,2 and 4 and 1, 3 and 4 respectively. Again get these at a good speed where you are concentrating but not to the point where you ae tense or unable to keep time. Keep pushing these speeds. Work your hand hard but not too hard. I suggest doing both of these exercises for 10 minutes each. These should have your left hand gaining speed and confidence in no time with a bit of work. When you are comfortbale with these then you can try harder licks.

Another pointer...keep your fingers close to the fretbaord...we don't want to see them flying away and as you get faster your fingers should actually become closer to the fretbaord. This will only happen if you are not tensing up. If you are tensing up they will fly.

Another pointer...when playing a lick where your first finger is always on the stret like a sort of 'barre' dont always be applying pressure. So when you are pulling off the 12th fret to the 10th fret with your 4th and 2nd finger respectively dont be applying pressure on your first finger. This is not to say you have to lift it away when its not being used/. Just practice releasing the pressure in it. Its a subtle thing but when you are playing fast...believe me it helps. This applies to any finger. Try to relax it when its noin use without lifting it from the string.

I am just out of bed so I apologise if this reads like gibberish. Any problems gimme a shout
Andy
#3
Thanks for the supportive help
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#5
Just start with your scales, and just play them through slowly.

     E   E  E   E   E  E   E   E     E   E   E  E   E  E   E   E   
E||-------------------------------|--------------------2h--3p--2--|
B||-------------------------------|-------------3h--5-------------|
G||-------------------------------|--2h--4h--5--------------------|
D||--------------------2h--4h--5--|-------------------------------|
A||---------2h--3h--5-------------|-------------------------------|
E||--3h--5------------------------|-------------------------------|


  E   E  E   E   E  E   E   E     E   E   E  E   Q      
-------------------------------|----------------------||
--5p--3------------------------|----------------------||
---------5p--4p--2-------------|----------------------||
--------------------5p--4p--2--|----------------------||
-------------------------------|--5p--3p--2-----------||
-------------------------------|-------------5p--3----||


Just get a metronome, and play that, either 2 or 4 notes per beat.
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#7
I hope you can accept this in the spirit in which I'm offering it...

Hammering half-steps and then moving to the next string on the same frets is about as straightforward a legato challenge as they come. If you cannot yet play this exercise well please take Freepower's advice to heart and practice this exercise at as slow a tempo, and for as long as it takes, to play it perfectly before moving on to anything more difficult. In my opinion, scales are orders of magnitude more difficult than the exercise you've posted from the standpoint of legato playing.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
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