#1
Alright, so do you think if i learn guitar techniques through lessons like justin guitar, and then learn songs by tabs, will that really hinder my learning process? will i be cheating my self? or should i try to improvise everything.
#2
you should go with both. thats how you get honestly good. i learned the hard way. but im good now.
#4
it doesnt cheat you at all. but if you want to be real official n such, you should probly take a look at actual sheet music and become somewhat familiar w/ reading and writing music for guitar. its not real hard, just takes some practice
#5
i don't think its cheating, everyone has a different style of learning.
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#7
If you have any intention of learning theory then you need to learn to read actual music and not just numbers on lines. If not then you can stick with tab.
#9
Even in that case, you don't have to be great at reading music. I can't sight read for crap and I was a music production major.
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#10
do what you want.

i plan to learn theory properly... i used to play sax so that was all sight reading... however for guitar i just use tabs.
#11
Quote by pwrmax
If you have any intention of learning theory then you need to learn to read actual music and not just numbers on lines. If not then you can stick with tab.


What are youtalking about? There is no need to learn how to read music even if you want to learn music theory. I study theory but I don't know how to read sheet music. There is no need for it.
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#12
Quote by philipp122
What are youtalking about? There is no need to learn how to read music even if you want to learn music theory. I study theory but I don't know how to read sheet music. There is no need for it.


How can you construct a chord triad or identify intervals without even knowing how to read them properly? It would be like writing a book without being able to read. And don't say 1st fret on the E string to 2nd fret on the A string is a diminished 5th, it can also be an augmented 4th but if you can't read it on a grand staff then you will never know. And how would you know if the 3rd fret on the G string is an A# or a Bb if you can't read it on a staff?

Simply being able to identify a note on a grand staff if the 1st thing one must know if they intend to learn theory and a number on a line doesn't give that.
#13
I think when you're starting out tabs is the only way to go.
It would have been near impossible for me to figure it out by ear when I first started.

Then later it just came to me and I noticed notes when I heard music and I could hear the notes that went together.

So for me, with time I just my ear caught on more and more...and now I can figure out a whole song on my own........***To sum it up**** it just comes with time to develop an ear for music.
.
#14
Quote by The_lizard_king
i don't think its cheating, everyone has a different style of learning.


+1
#15
Quote by The_lizard_king
i don't think its cheating, everyone has a different style of learning.


Tab's only good if you know how the song goes. What if someone wants to email you a new song but has no audio recording of it and the only thing that can be sent is what you can write on paper? Tab doesn't have rhythm or dynamics so you can't sightread something you've never heard before, but you can sightread actual music.
#17
Quote by pwrmax
Tab's only good if you know how the song goes. What if someone wants to email you a new song but has no audio recording of it and the only thing that can be sent is what you can write on paper? Tab doesn't have rhythm or dynamics so you can't sightread something you've never heard before, but you can sightread actual music.


Tell them to get powertab or guitarpro. . . but I totally agree with you guy. . . lots of sense in that. I cheat with Guitarpro and powertab, that's my link to not having to read music, I had actually reading music, it's too much trouble.

There is Hybrid tab though, like in Guitar World and Guitar One mag's. It gives a note measurement and such. Everything that's needed.
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Last edited by notsee at Oct 3, 2008,
#18
Quote by pwrmax
How can you construct a chord triad or identify intervals without even knowing how to read them properly? It would be like writing a book without being able to read. And don't say 1st fret on the E string to 2nd fret on the A string is a diminished 5th, it can also be an augmented 4th but if you can't read it on a grand staff then you will never know. And how would you know if the 3rd fret on the G string is an A# or a Bb if you can't read it on a staff?

Simply being able to identify a note on a grand staff if the 1st thing one must know if they intend to learn theory and a number on a line doesn't give that.


*sigh*

Why does it matter? You study music so you know what goes with what. It's used to write chord progressions in key and to know what scales or modes can be used where. Why does it matter if I call it an augmented fourth or a diminished fifth? Harmonically, it still sounds as a tritone and enharmonically speaking they're the same thing; when it comes to chord constructing you will use the term more properly suited.

I know how tired you probably are of hearing a guy like me saying "enharmonically speaking, it's the same thing", but the way I use music theory doesn't require the use of reading sheet music. I use music theory to contruct chords, chord progressions, and to know which scales, modes, and notes sound good where. I don't need sheet music.
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#19
yea you really don't need to learn basically any theory unless you wanna right songs, play solos to some songs like make up your own solos for classic songs, or if you wanna play jazz or just get with a group of friends and jam. These are all things I wanna do so i'm learning theory, transcription, transposition, and sight reading.
#20
Quote by amd123
yea you really don't need to learn basically any theory unless you wanna right songs, play solos to some songs like make up your own solos for classic songs, or if you wanna play jazz or just get with a group of friends and jam. These are all things I wanna do so i'm learning theory, transcription, transposition, and sight reading.


The whole fun in playing guitar is improvising, soloing, jamming, and writing songs. So basically, without being knowledgeable in music you really can't do anything except play along with already-written songs.
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