#1
So, as i progress into modes and tonal solo's it is becoming more and more urgent to memorize all the notes on the fretboard so i know where I can stop when im shredding, and where the notes are so i can play melodically. I know all the notes but i can't pull them out at the blink of an eye, i have to like think about it and figure it out, which isn't very helpful when improvising. Im going to try to spend like 3 hours tonight and memorize them all lol, but ill prolly just do half tonight and half friday afternoon. Im gonna try to just play each note on each string up and back then do it an octave up. I'm thinking thats gonna be the best route. ive tried to do this before and once i get a few memorized and i stop practicing them on a regular basis i forget where they are. Should i just each day name all the notes or is there a better way to make them really stick with you.
#2
Dedicate a specific amount of time per day to learning each string. Learn the way the strings relate to each other first (like octave shapes) and then learn the notes on each string.
#3
playing chord progressions on each string individually helps. also memorize the all the major (or pentatonic) scale positions, and take note of where in the scale certain landmark notes (root, tension&redeeming, whatever) so as you move throughout entire scale youll always have these reference points no matter what key youre playing.

basically finding a purpose for a specific note within a scale will help you remember where it is.
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#5
Quote by Shecter78787
So, as i progress into modes and tonal solo's it is becoming more and more urgent to memorize all the notes on the fretboard so i know where I can stop when im shredding, and where the notes are so i can play melodically.


I think you're using the wrong tool for the wrong job. What you really want to know
is how the notes function over what you're playing, not what the note names are.
It can't hurt to know them, but you're just going to end up giving up again. That's
because learning how a note functions by its note name, at improvisational recall
speed, will take a long long long time. It's the hard road. It's easier using the
organizational patterns of the fretboard to do this.

If you want to learn the note names, the best way is to probably read music. Lots
and lots of it.
#6
Well, I guess the best way for improvisation is first to know which scale you are going to use, or which key you are in, and then remembering the notes create a pattern (like the pentatonic one, etc) in that key with the notes you know, etc, and change that pattern everytime you are trying to play a different scale (at least you don't have to memorize all the notes, just memorize the pattern you create)...
#9
i just memorized the basic note names up to twelve (a, b, c, d, etc..), then just added in the sharps when i needed to, trust me learning the note names will help you HEAPS as you progress through keys and chord proggesions,
#10
i do also want to learn how the notes relate in the scale as like resolving and stuff like that. but i also just want to know the name of the notes on each fret just to know them.
#11
Quote by Myung-trucci
Dedicate a specific amount of time per day to learning each string. Learn the way the strings relate to each other first (like octave shapes) and then learn the notes on each string.


+1

The thing about learning something like this is that you cant just spend 3 hrs and cram it into your head. Just make a commitment to spend 10 minutes every day and stick with it.
#12
learn the the major scale positions.. learn the D-A-F jump (D-skip 1 fret-A-skip 2 frets-F)..

things start to click after that...

then learn modes.
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#13
No, dont learn positions. They will not get you by in the end. Learn the notes of the fretboard and the relationships between the strings first, then learn the shapes.
#14
If you really want to get them down, try breaking it into small pieces first. Instead of going at the entire neck of the guitar, memorize where one note occurs on each string, or memorize a specific interval or triad on each string. So maybe like, know where the D to E M2 occurs on every string. Or, if a triad works for you, take one string and find each note that corresponds to a specific triad. Am for example. Work on finding A, C and E on the 6th string. Say each note aloud, and repeat until you feel comfortable with it. Then move to the next string. Spend 15 minutes or so a day beating this into your brain, varying the notes, intervals or triads, and soon enough you'll know exactly what notes you are playing at all times.
#15
I read in a book and i found that way pretty effective.

Its like everyday learn all the positions of one note on the fretboard.
Like say start off with A.
So A would be E: 5, 17; A: 0,12; D: 7,19; G: 2,14; B: 10,22; e: 5,17.
(play these notes on the guitar and hear for yourself how they all sound the A note. It could also help you recognizing the A note, bit of pitch recognition thing there!)...

And as you do this, you'll also start to recognise patterns and how all the notes on the fretboard are confined to that pattern.
Don't try to learn all the notes in a matter of 1 or 2 days. It won't happen. There's only so much your brain can take at ones so keep it simple as like one note per day.
And like once you know where all the A's are, you can know the A#'s or the G#'s are gonna be right next to them and the B's are gonna be just one fret away...

so now that you know where all the A's are on the fretboard, next day learn where all the B's are.
If you do this, in about 7-10 days you should know where all the notes on the fretboard are...
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Oct 9, 2008,
#16
a good thing to do is pick a key and improvise in that key, naming each note as you play it, that way you are moving around the whole fretboard and doing something musical that is more fun than just going through the notes on the strings.
#17
I mean you know the names of the strings already right?

Then you know the 12th fret on that string is going to be the same note.

You also already know the 7th fret up until the B string will always be the same note as the string underneath it


The 5th note (until the B string) is always the same Note as the string above it.

Theres alot of little tricks like that which I just learned overtime that finally gave me knowledge of the fretboard.

I didnt try and memorize the notes, I just picked up on it after playing for so long.


The way I think I would do it If I was in your shoes, would be to spend time on each string. Memorizing what the notes are on every string.

Spend today on the E string alone.

Then you only have 4 more strings to worry about

if you spend a few hours everyday, you'd make amazing progress
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Oct 9, 2008,
#18
Isn't memorizing the fretboard like a task of 10 minuites?

Mastering the fretboard is what will take a long time.
#19
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
Isn't memorizing the fretboard like a task of 10 minuites?

Mastering the fretboard is what will take a long time.


As to the first point... Um... No?

Seriously, unless you have freakish memory, 10m of work won't have you able to fret a random note and instantly know what note it is, or be able to find any note you want anywhere on the fretboard with no hesitation. Maybe you can, I don't know, but for most of us... just no.

The second point, however, I completely agree with.

Grep.
#20
Quote by Grep
As to the first point... Um... No?

Seriously, unless you have freakish memory, 10m of work won't have you able to fret a random note and instantly know what note it is, or be able to find any note you want anywhere on the fretboard with no hesitation. Maybe you can, I don't know, but for most of us... just no.

The second point, however, I completely agree with.

Grep.


That's what I just said...

All you have to do is remember the alphabet and kinda fux it up a bit and just count down from the open string until you reach the note.

Mastering the fretboard would be without hesitation.
#21
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
That's what I just said...

All you have to do is remember the alphabet and kinda fux it up a bit and just count down from the open string until you reach the note.

Mastering the fretboard would be without hesitation.


Ok, then we're on the same page

Ah, semantics... lol

Grep.