#1
is Marcus Miller not all hes cracked up to be. I mean he's got talent, but i don't really enjoy his compositions as much as other artists, am i alone here?
#3
That's how I feel about plenty of solo artists out there.
Quote by breakdown123
Is there such a thing as a heavy riff with out chugging on the e string?
#4
i respect him but I agree. no doubt hes a great bassist though.
Quote by metalcore123
I hate trying to cover up my cheese in school because the bimbo next to me dislikes the smell of pure love.

I'm bringing farts back!
#5
Most solo bassists aren't really my cup of tea either.
I prefer those who can groove in the background and still stand out. And Les Claypool.
GHOST BLOWJOB!
WHOOO! WOOOOOOOOOOOO!
#6
I think he's pretty damn good. He's also pretty decent on the Clarinet.
Last edited by Captain Insano at Oct 2, 2008,
#8
Almost all of the "solo" bassists are just plain overrated (i.e. Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm, ect) as well as the celebrity bassists like Flea and Claypool. I'd much rather hear a bassist who is an integral part of a BAND's sound who works with the other musicians then listen to these slap, tap and pop babies.
#9
I quite like Miller, less as a bassist and more as a composer actually. If you're talking about his producing skill though *shudder*. I'm not sure why you're pointing out him though. If you don't like him it's more likely that that cool jazz/smooth jazz type stuff he plays isn't your cup of tea, not him. In fact, he's the only cool jazz I can stand for more than a few minutes. (Die, Kind of Blue)
#10
Marcus is one of those folks that I love seeing live; he's a great performer and talented bassist. I don't think his recorded output tends to do him justice in some ways; his new CD is a bit uneven (though I like his take on Higher Ground and his rendition of Milky Way with Keb Mo'.
#11
Quote by Randy Bobandy
Almost all of the "solo" bassists are just plain overrated (i.e. Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm, ect) as well as the celebrity bassists like Flea and Claypool. I'd much rather hear a bassist who is an integral part of a BAND's sound who works with the other musicians then listen to these slap, tap and pop babies.

TESTIFAH MAH BRUTHA!

I couldn't agree more. although I do love Flea... but nearly all solo bassists are just trying to be something that a bassist has no business being. My favorites are the ones that make the band better. Timmy C for the win.
I'm not a fan of facts. You see, the facts can change, but my opinion will never change, no matter what the facts are. - Stephen Colbert

#12
as far as soloists go, the two I like best are easily Miller and Pastorius, because they can still groove while soloing. the others are good, they just don't feel it quite like a bassist should in my opinion. but you have to keep that groove. or you aren't a bass player.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#13
Quote by Link.JohnIrving
TESTIFAH MAH BRUTHA!

I couldn't agree more. although I do love Flea... but nearly all solo bassists are just trying to be something that a bassist has no business being. My favorites are the ones that make the band better. Timmy C for the win.


Why should a bassist fill a predetermined role? What ever happened to pushing boundaries and expanding musical horizons? If people didn't venture into "what they have no business in being" then we wouldn't have slap bass for a start, and therefore possibly not have these nice and relatively cheaper solid state amplifiers. Music is about expression, no matter what instrument you use. If you want to go off and do some solo pieces, then you have every right to make it your business.

Jesus... people complain when they're "not allowed to be creative within their band" and then complain when people think outside the box...
#14
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Why should a bassist fill a predetermined role? What ever happened to pushing boundaries and expanding musical horizons? If people didn't venture into "what they have no business in being" then we wouldn't have slap bass for a start, and therefore possibly not have these nice and relatively cheaper solid state amplifiers. Music is about expression, no matter what instrument you use. If you want to go off and do some solo pieces, then you have every right to make it your business.

Jesus... people complain when they're "not allowed to be creative within their band" and then complain when people think outside the box...


+1 if bassists only thought in the box we most likely would have no solos and some techniques might have never been discovered ex: what delerium said about slap bass. also i kinda hate it when people think the bass should ONLY hit root notes, or say the instruments easier than guitar, but thats a little off topic.
#15
Whatever. I guess I should have elaborated more. I forgot I was posting here as opposed to the more relaxed communities. Feel free to step down from the soap box, climb off the high horse, etc.
I'm not a fan of facts. You see, the facts can change, but my opinion will never change, no matter what the facts are. - Stephen Colbert

#16
Quote by Link.JohnIrving
Whatever. I guess I should have elaborated more. I forgot I was posting here as opposed to the more relaxed communities. Feel free to step down from the soap box, climb off the high horse, etc.


Likewise, feel free to get over yourself.
#17
I'm probably the only one who thinks his tone is crap, you can't even tell the difference between his normal playing and slapping.
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Of course I don't wanna go in the woods. There's bears in there.


Quote by Deliriumbassist
Jeff Ament is a sexy sexy beast.



Quote by Karvid
Yes. Chest hair = automatic awesome. Even if you're a woman.
#18
Quote by Randy Bobandy
Almost all of the "solo" bassists are just plain overrated (i.e. Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm, ect) as well as the celebrity bassists like Flea and Claypool. I'd much rather hear a bassist who is an integral part of a BAND's sound who works with the other musicians then listen to these slap, tap and pop babies.

Claypool, Miller and Flea are all a HUGE part of their band's sound.
Saying people are overrated doesn't make you cool.
Quote by brandooon
Buy both pickups. Rub icyhot on both of them. Sandwich your penis between them and walk to the nearest homeless shelter with your brand new icyhot penis sandwich.
#19
Quote by Woogles
Claypool, Miller and Flea are all a HUGE part of their band's sound.
Saying people are overrated doesn't make you cool.


you are overrated


o wait it doesn't work
Quote by cakeandpiemofo
Of course I don't wanna go in the woods. There's bears in there.


Quote by Deliriumbassist
Jeff Ament is a sexy sexy beast.



Quote by Karvid
Yes. Chest hair = automatic awesome. Even if you're a woman.
#20
Quote by slaptasticdave
you are overrated


o wait it doesn't work

I wish
Quote by brandooon
Buy both pickups. Rub icyhot on both of them. Sandwich your penis between them and walk to the nearest homeless shelter with your brand new icyhot penis sandwich.
#21
Quote by Link.JohnIrving
Whatever. I guess I should have elaborated more. I forgot I was posting here as opposed to the more relaxed communities. Feel free to step down from the soap box, climb off the high horse, etc.


Yes, its a right shame when someone gets uptight and challenges your belief and opinions and makes you defend them and re-examine them. I rather be in nice calm communities where we all agree

Lets be frank--if the electric bass hadn't evolved, we'd all be sitting back by the drums playing an instrument that served the purpose of being a rhythmic bass drum and stuck somewhere around 1963/64. Every generation has pull bass further out of the box and pushed the techniques further. Yes--they may not all be your cuppa, but realize that even Tim C is a sum of the collective parts of those who pushed the envelope before him.
#22
Quote by anarkee
Yes, its a right shame when someone gets uptight and challenges your belief and opinions and makes you defend them and re-examine them. I rather be in nice calm communities where we all agree

Lets be frank--if the electric bass hadn't evolved, we'd all be sitting back by the drums playing an instrument that served the purpose of being a rhythmic bass drum and stuck somewhere around 1963/64. Every generation has pull bass further out of the box and pushed the techniques further. Yes--they may not all be your cuppa, but realize that even Tim C is a sum of the collective parts of those who pushed the envelope before him.


Exactly. What is weird now may become perfectly normal in 10 years or so, such as slap and pop. Originally developed to fill in for drums and bass at the same time, now one of the most widely used techniques around.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

Quote by ScottB
Quote by CLIFF_BURTON
gm jack knows everything
+1
#23
I love listening to Marcus Miller more than to any other bassist, bar perhaps these few other lead/soloing bassists already mentioned in this thread.
Here's why;
Being a bassist myself I find it very hard to really get into other bassists music. Somehow I always find myself hearing them through my 'expert' ear and making judgements like; 'I can do better than that' (unbelievable but true; some recording bassist are worse than me), 'I can do that too', 'If I really pushed myself I would be able to learn to play that' or, most often of all, 'No freakin' way I'd ever be able to play that'. Especially the last sentiment can sometimes really stand in the way of enjoying an otherwise perfectly good piece of music.
Marcus Miller goes so far outside anything I'd ever do on a bass, his virtuousity doesn't touch me. I can listen to him like I can listen to the best oboe player in the world cause I have no ambition for oboe either.
#24
Quote by Taygunov
is Marcus Miller not all hes cracked up to be. I mean he's got talent, but i don't really enjoy his compositions as much as other artists, am i alone here?

This all boils down to taste, I'm sure there's many people who prefer Miller to the other artists you listen to, in your eyes he may be overrated as a composer because you don't like his music but someone who does would say that he deserves all the praise he receives.

Quote by Randy Bobandy
Almost all of the "solo" bassists are just plain overrated (i.e. Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm, ect) as well as the celebrity bassists like Flea and Claypool. I'd much rather hear a bassist who is an integral part of a BAND's sound who works with the other musicians then listen to these slap, tap and pop babies.

You do realise that "Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm etc." all play in bands and are highly regarded studio musicians as well as being solo artists, they know when to hold back and when to let fly, it's just that their reputation on bass forums (unfortunately) is based almost exclusively from various solos on youtube when they really do go to town. Take Stu Hamm's famous bass solo for example, that was filmed in the middle of a Satriani set I believe and for the rest of the set, Stu was an integral part of the band but while the rest of the band took a break, he showed the crowd a completely different side of bass playing.
Quote by Bumper
Looks like you had a big bowl of Downs Syndrome for breakfast.



Member of the Bass Militia, PM Nutter_101 to join

Lover of Ashdown? Join the Ashdown Army!
#25
Quote by indie-bassist
You do realise that "Miller, Wooten, Stu Hamm etc." all play in bands and are highly regarded studio musicians as well as being solo artists, they know when to hold back and when to let fly, it's just that their reputation on bass forums (unfortunately) is based almost exclusively from various solos on youtube when they really do go to town. Take Stu Hamm's famous bass solo for example, that was filmed in the middle of a Satriani set I believe and for the rest of the set, Stu was an integral part of the band but while the rest of the band took a break, he showed the crowd a completely different side of bass playing.


Quite so. Here's a nice clip to illustrate this:
http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=mrav_MSMjNs
Guess who of those three great bass soloists is gladly submitting himself to the humble bass players role of glueing together rhythm and melody into a solid piece of wonderfull music? Who is keeping the groove to allow the others to freak away on their uncanny virtuousity?
It's mr. Miller alright.
And when it's finally his turn to show off, he still keeps holding the groove all the way through his own solo.......
I don't know what to say more.