#1
Ok, so I've been trying to make the transition from just songs with amybe a few picked notes and heavey chords, to mostly picked/fast/heavey/technical music. During this I've been working on songs that are just way too complexe. I know the techniques, but only on a low level and I'm not that fast at them. So what I've been doing is slowing everything down and learning it, and increasing it until I can play it all correctly. However recently someone told me that this was a bad idea and that I should just do exercises, because I'm most likely taking shortcuts without noticing and just screwing myself over in the long run. Could he be right, or am I working on things the right way? I mean I make sure I have everything perfect at 1 tempo before I increase at all and I use the speed trainer on Guitar Pro 5 going up 1% at a time.
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#2
John Petrucci says to slow things down and do it perfect and then speed it up little by little practicing it perfectly until the desired tempo. If it works for him, it should work for you
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#4
I do have one other question though. Right now I'm learning Polaris by The Human Abstract. Is it best to master 1 riff at the original speed, then do the next riff, or should I do the entire song at once slow, then speed it up?
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ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


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#5
I would ask that same question because I have no clue. The whole point is to not get your muscle memory to memorize mistakes. So, as long as you're playing it correctly, you should be good. If you can do one riff at full speed, then sweet; skip to a part you can't do and practice it slowly. It might be best to do the whole thing slow so you can play into the parts you're working on so it becomes more natural.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#6
I would say work on one riff at a time first, then work on the entire song.
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#7
Yeah, that's what I've been doing, but I've got to tell you after playing the intro riff to the song over 100 times at 40% It's getting a bit annoying.
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ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?
#8
^
Eventually, I've found, you don't need to play the intro to a song 600 times before you can finally start doing it. Doing what you're doing now, you're going to develop technically. If all of the songs that you want to play require roughly the same amount of skill, then you'll theoretically have less trouble learning more songs if they all use the same techniques. If there's string skipping in the intro to a song, like in the beginning of the song I'm Alright by Neil Zaza, then you'll learn it, and later on it won't be so difficult. That's the case for me, atleast. I know that not all musicians pick up on things as quickly as others (I'm in the category of people that is somewhat slow with learning on the guitar...), but you work into new techniques.
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#9
Quote by bambamm89
Ok, so I've been trying to make the transition from just songs with amybe a few picked notes and heavey chords, to mostly picked/fast/heavey/technical music. During this I've been working on songs that are just way too complexe. I know the techniques, but only on a low level and I'm not that fast at them. So what I've been doing is slowing everything down and learning it, and increasing it until I can play it all correctly. However recently someone told me that this was a bad idea and that I should just do exercises, because I'm most likely taking shortcuts without noticing and just screwing myself over in the long run. Could he be right, or am I working on things the right way? I mean I make sure I have everything perfect at 1 tempo before I increase at all and I use the speed trainer on Guitar Pro 5 going up 1% at a time.



That guy is a complete idiot. That's exactly how one should practice difficult passages.

/thread
#10
I would tend to get a riff down to about 30-50% full tempo and then move on to the next section. It's terminally dull moving each riff up to tempo before moving on to the next one and may not really be an option if there's a huge gap between your technique and the song's required technique. Plus, the places between riffs/sections is where the mistake gremlins live.
#11
Learning to play an exercise well will make you good at that exercise. Learning music well will make you good at music. Learn the music and take what you can from it.
#12
Metronome, metronome, metronome.

I'm surprised nobody else here has said that.

Practice with a metronome, slow it down to SLOWER than you think you need to, and get that down perfectly. Then speed up a little. Get that perfect. Speed up some more. Eventually it'll come.

There are plenty of metronomes you can find for free online, or get download to an iPhone or iPod Touch or something. They work great.
#13
Quote by Philbigtime
That guy is a complete idiot. That's exactly how one should practice difficult passages.

/thread

I'm pretty sure MT has a no bullshit policy (if not, we should). What's so wrong about asking a question? That doesn't make someone an idiot.


*reported*



Disregard Post
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Oct 3, 2008,
#14
Quote by metal4all
I'm pretty sure MT has a no bullshit policy (if not, we should). What's so wrong about asking a question? That doesn't make someone an idiot.


*reported*



Uh...he wasn't referring to the TS.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Oopsies. Sorry about that.

...I didn't even hit the report button. I'm so out of it, it's terrible.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#17
Quote by Freepower
I would tend to get a riff down to about 30-50% full tempo and then move on to the next section. It's terminally dull moving each riff up to tempo before moving on to the next one and may not really be an option if there's a huge gap between your technique and the song's required technique. Plus, the places between riffs/sections is where the mistake gremlins live.


+1

This is exactly how I go about it. I do a first pass learning the whole song or at least most of the song slowly. Like FP, this is usually around 50% speed though it depends on the complexity and speed of the song. Then I put it together so that I can play the whole song. Then I speed up the whole song a bit (maybe 5%), and identify the weakest couple of sections. I spend the next few days working on those sections like crazy, then put the whole song together again, and bump the speed a bit more. Again, at that point I say "ok, what were the weakest couple of parts". Then work on those like crazy. And keep repeating the process until I have it up to full speed and pretty tight.

What FP said about the mistake gremlins living in the joins between sections is also right on the money. Thats because we often spend a disproportiate amount of time working on each section and not so much putting them together. One thing I do quite often is practice a section together with the last bar of the section before it, so I'm always working on the join. The main exception to this is when I have to zoom right into a very short section (like a few beats long) for massive attention usually because of some aspect of my technique thats not up to par.