#1
here in Austin..i'm now in college, 19 now.

I was in one back in Houston, and we actually won battle of the bands for my hs, even with originals I "wrote"..

Anyways, I've been playing for five years now and my question is, what do I really need to work on, in regards to playing, but mainly writing, with a band? I know pentatonics, major scale, minor scale, lots of different chords, memorized all notes on E and A string, something called the "C.A.G.E. Sequence", I know tons of songs of course, and I've written a handful of finished songs by trial and error, and by using stuff like

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/chord_progressions.php

to mess with with different chords in a key and find something that sounds cool to me...(kinda feels like cheating)

That's another thing, I usually can't just sit and think up a real cool melody or chord progression or line, I just have to mess around enough by playing, and by trial and error till I find something I really like...I imagine that's not the best/efficient way to go about it..and it seems that would really put off a bandmember at a practice or something..

So if I am playing and writing with a band, what are just some fundamental things I need to work on memorizing,learning etc?

and if it makes any difference I mainly play Alternative Rock, 90's, funk, Radiohead and Pinkfloyd type stuff.

Thanks for any help
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
#3
A good way to write is to know your cycle of fifths within the key your writing in so you can work out appropriate chord progressions from there, and If you know how each chord functions within a key, and you already have lyrics, you can lay down the basic progression to fit the mood of the lyrics without picking up a guitar, and then go from there for the actual instrumentation
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#4
Quote by ginjaninja
how to improvise melody lines in those scales?


so, how exactly should I go about learning how to do that well?
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
#5
Quote by druz15_UG
A good way to write is to know your cycle of fifths within the key your writing in so you can work out appropriate chord progressions from there, and If you know how each chord functions within a key, and you already have lyrics, you can lay down the basic progression to fit the mood of the lyrics without picking up a guitar, and then go from there for the actual instrumentation


let's say the band got the instrumental first, then vocals, what's a good way to go about creating that instrumental...

like if a dude's playing a bassline and he wants me to think up a good chord progression to go over it, or anything, just say coming up with a simple riff then i want a great chord progression after that..

I know some of this is hard to explain and stuff, but I just want as much advice and tips as as I can get.
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
#6
^^^The best way to come up with stuff for the instrumentation is to jam it out with the bassist and drummer and then get the vocalist (or whoever wrote the lyrics) to work out something over the top of it to sing. My band does music first usually then sticks lyrics written separately over it (if it works) but when I write solo stuff, I go lyrics first, and work out the music around it.
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#7
Quote by druz15_UG
^^^The best way to come up with stuff for the instrumentation is to jam it out with the bassist and drummer and then get the vocalist (or whoever wrote the lyrics) to work out something over the top of it to sing. My band does music first usually then sticks lyrics written separately over it (if it works) but when I write solo stuff, I go lyrics first, and work out the music around it.


you're great with the help...but you keep looking over what I'm asking to know! you said "The best way to come up with stuff for the instrumentation is to jam it out with the bassist and drummer"

I'm saying what all do I need to know/learn to be proficient when jamming and writing with the bassist and drummer? (and remember I kind of know how to improvise a solo in a certain key, but as far as improvisation goes that's about it.)

anyways, haha, thanks again..
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
Last edited by Three11Rules at Oct 7, 2008,
#8
work on your singing, it helps with writing vocal lines over your songs. cause you are more confident., and try harder, and usually make better vocal melodies.
#9
Quote by HethaHORRIFIC
work on your singing, it helps with writing vocal lines over your songs. cause you are more confident., and try harder, and usually make better vocal melodies.


I usually wouldn't be writing vocal melodies, just melodies on the guitar most of the time I'd think..I need most of the help with writing chord progressions, or what I'd need to know to hear a bassline and be able to improvise well over it, or create a chord progression for it etc..
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
#10
still looking for an answer to my last post.
My username is old, don't judge me (but old 311 is good)
#11
Quote by Three11Rules
you're great with the help...but you keep looking over what I'm asking to know! you said "The best way to come up with stuff for the instrumentation is to jam it out with the bassist and drummer"

I'm saying what all do I need to know/learn to be proficient when jamming and writing with the bassist and drummer? (and remember I kind of know how to improvise a solo in a certain key, but as far as improvisation goes that's about it.)

anyways, haha, thanks again..

well things like knowing your scales and how to improvise definetly helps. Also what chords within that key you can play to add suspense/resolve etc like knowing If you play the a F#m in the key of E it resolves well to B and stuff like that. Then just when you jam it out riffs and stuff should come to you because of your knowledge of the chords and scales etc. But when it comes down to it, play what sounds good, If you're playing in a key but one of the notes you think sounds good ISNT in that key, it doesnt matter, roll with it.
basically knowing your theory helps a shitload but you can get by just having an ear for things.

It also helps if the bassist & other guitarist know their theory at least a little bit. I personally don't like working with other guitarists in band situations because If the other guy don't know what he's doing it can make you BOTH sound bad.

Hope I helped

EDIT: also jamming along to CDs and backng tracks, especially blues are great for improvising and developing your phrasing etc, which is important for soloing and writing riffs etc
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
Last edited by druz15_UG at Oct 15, 2008,