#1
In for example major scale, the E shape. Why are the root notes G then? Shouldn't they be E because it's the E shape..?
GEAR

Dean V79
Randall RG50-TC
Roland MicroCube
#3
E shape I imagine refers to the major scale pattern based on the shape of the "open" E Major Chord.

So the E shape pattern is like this (the numbers represent the scale degrees so 1 = root note). I have put the Chord notes in Bold to show the "E shape".

|-7-|-1-|---|-2-|
|---|-5-|---|-6-|
|-2-|---|-3-|-4-|
|-6-|---|-7-|-1-|
|-3-|-4-|---|-5-|
|-7-|-1-|---|-2-|


If you have the G as the root then you have this shape of the G Major Scale pattern. Your root notes on the E strings will be on the third fret. If you shift the pattern up two frets you have the A major scale. It will still be the "E shape" pattern since the root chord in this position is the same shape as the open "E shape". To avoid confusion you might rename the patterns as pattern one pattern two pattern three etc.

In other words the name of the shape refers to the "root chord shape" and the whole thing can be played anywhere on the fretboard to use different root notes and so different major scales.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 4, 2008,
#4
I still don't get it. On justinguitar.com he expalins it like this:

"So place your second finger at the 3rd fret and you will play the G Major Scale (because the note on the 3rd fret of the 6th string is the note G)"

But the scale says Major (E)

GEAR

Dean V79
Randall RG50-TC
Roland MicroCube
#5
I just had a look at the article on justinguitar.com and the diagrams do look a bit unintuitive. I think what he means is that the red R dot is the root note, which in this case is G, so the red R dot must be the third fret on the e string, and you can find the rest of the notes relative to this.

I don't think I've ever seen a more complicated way to learn 7 notes.
#6
Quote by SlappyTheFish
I just had a look at the article on justinguitar.com and the diagrams do look a bit unintuitive. I think what he means is that the red R dot is the root note, which in this case is G, so the red R dot must be the third fret on the e string, and you can find the rest of the notes relative to this.

I don't think I've ever seen a more complicated way to learn 7 notes.

Why is the scale called E major then when he says the scale get it's name from the root note?
GEAR

Dean V79
Randall RG50-TC
Roland MicroCube
#7
It's not an E major *scale*. It's an E major *pattern*. It's based on the pattern of the major scale over the open E chord, as someone posted. But that describes the pattern, NOT the scale itself. You can play that pattern in any key you want.

Look up the "CAGED" scale patterns if you want a better idea what's going on. There's 4 other patterns based on C, A, G and D scale patterns, which would be the patterns you would get for the major scale in *open position* over those major chords.

Hope that clears it up a little. Just read up on the CAGED patterns and things should be clearer. But it's only an E major scale using that pattern if the root note happens to be an E. It can be any other possible note. It's a movable pattern that can be used to play in any major key.

You're mixing up "pattern" with "key" or "scale". It's an E major pattern no matter where you play it. It's just a convenient way of labeling that specific pattern, no more no less, and has no relation to the actual key it's being used to play in.

Grep.