#1
I need some help good ol' UG

I need 4 chords that go into a chord sequence that is in a rock/jazz fusion kinda style. Like some 70s laid back stuff. I would prefer the key to be in E minor G minor or A minor.
#2
Em7 A7 Dmaj7 Bm7

I think that'd be E dorian

edit: Dm7 G7 Cmaj7 Am7
thats D dorian which is relative to A minor
#4
Quote by ouchies
ii V I

or I vi ii V

which scale would that be on? And thanks for the replies.
#5
Quote by sunnyo
which scale would that be on? And thanks for the replies.



Any scale? The pitch won't matter as the intervals will sound the same.
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I wanna know what some blues sounding chords I could use in the key of D Aeolian fifth mode of Melodic Minor.

Quote by szekelymihai
try looking for Cm, or any of those complicated jazz chords
#6
Quote by sunnyo
which scale would that be on? And thanks for the replies.

What do you mean?


My 2 cents (as if it matters): Jazz uses circle progressions EVERYWHERE. A common sequence would be VI iiø V i

In A minor it would be: Fmaj7 - Bmin7b5 - E7 - Amin7
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#7
lol, I'm a kinda noob on theory and stuff...

Am

VI iiø V i

Fmaj7 - Bmin7b5 - E7 - Amin7

how come there are 7th chords n stuff there? can I add it to whatever chord I want?
#8
Quote by sunnyo
lol, I'm a kinda noob on theory and stuff...

Am

VI iiø V i

Fmaj7 - Bmin7b5 - E7 - Amin7

how come there are 7th chords n stuff there? can I add it to whatever chord I want?
Everyone started somewhere.

Those 7ths and stuff are just the extensions of the chords. You could turn them into 9th or 13th chords or whatever. They ARE still in key though (let me explain the E7 in a bit).


7th chords in a major key:
maj7, min7, min7, maj7, dom7, min7, min7b5


7th chords in a minor key:
min7, min7b5, maj7, min7, min7, maj7, dom7


The E7 technically isn't in key. E7: E, G#, B, D. G# isn't in A minor but G# IS a half-step away from it which makes it lead very nicely to the note A (which makes for a great resolution).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
Ahhh, so If I use the minor pentatonic, I can use something like Am7 Em11 Cm9 Gm7?


The E7 technically isn't in key. E7: E, G#, B, D. G# isn't in A minor but G# IS a half-step away from it which makes it lead very nicely to the note A (which makes for a great resolution).

So, would that be allright for a music composition which'll be marked?
#10
Quote by sunnyo
Ahhh, so If I use the minor pentatonic, I can use something like Am7 Em11 Cm9 Gm7?


So, would that be allright for a music composition which'll be marked?

A minor has no sharps or flats so looking at the chords:

Am7: A, C, E, B
Em11: E, G, B, (D), (F#), A
Cm9: C, Eb, G, B, D
Gm7: G, Bb, D, F


For those to be extended and still be in key, you'd need to change them so there aren't any sharps or flats.

Am7 is already in key
Em11(b9): E, G, (B), D, F, A
Cmaj9: C, E, G, B, D
G7: G, B, D, F


Quote by sunnyo
So, would that be allright for a music composition which'll be marked?
If you could explain how it utilizes the accidental as a leading tone to want to resolve up to the tonic, A, then I'm sure you'd be fine. I wouldn't do it unless you actually understood it though. It's better to do something you know and understand than try to do something over your head and have trouble explaining it in my opinion.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Oct 4, 2008,
#11
Wicked, thanks mate

Am7 is already in key
Em11(b9): E, G, (B), D, F, A
Cmaj9: C, E, G, B, D
G7: G, B, D, F

What scale do I use to solo over these? And will this be allright for my composition?
#12
Quote by sunnyo
Wicked, thanks mate

Am7 is already in key
Em11(b9): E, G, (B), D, F, A
Cmaj9: C, E, G, B, D
G7: G, B, D, F

What scale do I use to solo over these? And will this be allright for my composition?

The key is A minor so the best way for some inside, no worries playing, would be the A minor scale. You can use the other minor scales like Harmonic and Melodic for some fun. You could use any A scale you want (preferably any A scale with a b3) but since this is going to be marked you'll probably want to stay safe with natural minor.


Do you have a set of requirements for your composition? As of now, it's what you've asked (4 chords and jazzy).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#13
It just has to be in either ternery form (ABA structure song) or ground bass.
#14
Sorry, I have absolutely no clue what that means. Hopefully some one that does can throw some input. If you have any problems or questions feel free to ask away.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#15
it's when theres two sequences. sequence A then another sequence then back to that sequence. And ground bass is just a bassline that gets repeated.
#18
Quote by sunnyo
huh?

I think he meant that was a major progression he posted and/or you would use the major scale over it.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#19
Ohh I was getting confused

On the chord Em11(b9), how could I play this? If I play the chord Em11, what note do I need to add to get the b9?

And, Instead of the G7, what else could I use to make it fit into A minor?
Last edited by sunnyo at Oct 4, 2008,
#20
Quote by sunnyo
Ohh I was getting confused

On the chord Em11(b9), how could I play this? If I play the chord Em11, what note do I need to add to get the b9?

Here's the thing:


m11: 1, b3, (5), b7, (9), 11
Em11: E, G, (B), D, (F#), A


( ) means the note is optional. Once you have so many notes, it gets hard to play the chord because there are so many notes to play at once. That's why we leave notes out. We leave out the ones that don't contribute to the chord as much. With a minor 11th chord, the most important ones are the ones that define the chord, like the b3, b7, and 11 (it's an 11th chord so you HAVE to have the 11, haha) so you can leave the 5 and 9 out.

So, if you wanted to play Em11, you could leave out the B or the F# or both.


m11(b0): 1, b3, (5), b7, b9, 11
Em11(b9): E, G, B, D, F, A


You need the same notes as a regular min11th chord but since there's an alteration on the 9 (it's now a b9) you need that note in the chord.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#21
Quote by sunnyo
Ohh I was getting confused

On the chord Em11(b9), how could I play this? If I play the chord Em11, what note do I need to add to get the b9?

And, Instead of the G7, what else could I use to make it fit into A minor?

Use any extension that doesn't have any out of key notes. It's simple.

dom9: 1, 3, 5, b7, 9
G9: G, B, D, F, A


add9: 1, 3, 5, 9
Gadd9: G, B, D, A


dom11: 1, 3, (5), b7, (9), 11
G11: G, B, (D), F, (A), C
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#22
Ahh wicked, I actually get theory now

So the b9 note is the note E...? Oh wait... or is it the note B? (ABout the Em11b9)

EDIT: You know like 1, 3, 5, b7, 9 what does the B mean? flat?
Last edited by sunnyo at Oct 4, 2008,
#23
Quote by sunnyo
Ahh wicked, I actually get theory now

So the b9 note is the note E...? Oh wait... or is it the note B?

EDIT: You know like 1, 3, 5, b7, 9 what does the B mean? flat?

To answer your first question I'll say this first: Intervals repeat. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, repeat here: 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. 1 is the tonic. 7 notes later you get back to the tonic, an octave higher, 8. So, 8 - 7 = 1 Well 9 is an octave higher than 2. 9-7=2

So, the b9 is the same note as the b2.


I don't know which chord you're talking about to know if it's the note E.


2nd question: "b" means flat (a half-step lower).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥