#1
Okay, so I know there are all the modes of scales - like the Dorian, Locrian, Phrygian etc. - but what I don't get is what defines a, say Dorian scale from a Locrian scale - besides the unprenouncable names. Explain...................please
Punctuation it the difference between:
"I help my Uncle Jack off a horse."
and
"i helped my uncle jack off a horse"


Quote by roadmax
..and how do i make the bridge erect. ..


Quote by Vampire 255
make it watch porn?

#2
the intervals between the notes, and where the roots are
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#3
All of the modes of a Major scale are derived from the Major scale, or in modal terms, the Ionian scale. The modes that proceed the Ionian mode are the Dorian, Phyrgian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian. These scales all occur on their respective interval in relation to the Ionian scale. For example, since the Lydian is the fourth mode, it would begin on the 4th of the Ionian Scale. In musical terms, if you wanted to play a Lydian scale in relation to the C Major scale, you would play the C Major scale beginning on its fourth scale degree, F.
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#4
but of course, then you get into some shit. For your playing to actually be modal you'll have to have a modal chord progression. I'm not very good at explaining but I'll try anyway. Hopefully someone will come along and give a better explanation.


alright, for a progression to be modal, and actually sound like the mode you're playing, you'll need to really stress the particular interval that is unique about the mode, while making it very apparent what the tonality is because modes are so delicate and it's easy for it to just sound like the relative major or minor.

So the vamp is normally between the I and whichever degree of the scale is the one that's unique, so you end up with two chords. If you try to work in more than those two it's more than likely it won't sound like that mode any more. I'd give examples and such, but I'm not really that good with this stuff yet. somebody else'll probably help more.

Modes are really tricky things and you probably shouldn't get into them until you've really got your Major and Minor scales down good and really understand them.
#5
Quote by The4thHorsemen
but of course, then you get into some shit. For your playing to actually be modal you'll have to have a modal chord progression. I'm not very good at explaining but I'll try anyway. Hopefully someone will come along and give a better explanation.


alright, for a progression to be modal, and actually sound like the mode you're playing, you'll need to really stress the particular interval that is unique about the mode, while making it very apparent what the tonality is because modes are so delicate and it's easy for it to just sound like the relative major or minor.

So the vamp is normally between the I and whichever degree of the scale is the one that's unique, so you end up with two chords. If you try to work in more than those two it's more than likely it won't sound like that mode any more. I'd give examples and such, but I'm not really that good with this stuff yet. somebody else'll probably help more.

Modes are really tricky things and you probably shouldn't get into them until you've really got your Major and Minor scales down good and really understand them.


Okay dude, I didn't really get that explination - sorry . I know modes are tricky but I do want to understand them. I know my majors and minors pretty well - I've done the theory enough times and am frankly sick of them, ha ha .
Punctuation it the difference between:
"I help my Uncle Jack off a horse."
and
"i helped my uncle jack off a horse"


Quote by roadmax
..and how do i make the bridge erect. ..


Quote by Vampire 255
make it watch porn?

#6
Quote by Black Adder
Okay dude, I didn't really get that explination - sorry . I know modes are tricky but I do want to understand them. I know my majors and minors pretty well - I've done the theory enough times and am frankly sick of them, ha ha .
Forget about vamps for now (later on in the thread we'll probably get to them). Do you now know how each mode is different?
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#7
Quote by Black Adder
Okay dude, I didn't really get that explination - sorry . I know modes are tricky but I do want to understand them. I know my majors and minors pretty well - I've done the theory enough times and am frankly sick of them, ha ha .

The difference between modes is the differing interval degrees.

Ionian = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = Major
Dorian = 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 = same as Natural Minor with a natural 6
Phrygian = 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = same as Natural Minor with a flat 2
Lydian = 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 = same as Major scale with sharp 4
Mixolydian = 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 = same as Major scale with flat 7
Aeolian = 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = Natural Minor scale
Locrian = 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 = Locrian Mode.

p.s. if you understand the similarities between say C Major and A minor scales and how each of them are different then you have a basic grasp of how using the same notes can create a different effect.
Si
#8
^In addition to understanding relative modes, you should understand parallel modes as well.

C Ionian: C D E F G A B C
C Dorian: C D Eb F G A Bb C
C Phrygian: C Db Eb E G Ab Bb C

...and so on.