#1
I know this is a difficult question, but how do I put emotion into my soloing? Whenever I jam, usally in minor pentatonics or natural minor, it just sounds like a scale or series of notes. I've been playing for a while and I'm getting the feeling that I'm just the sort of person that "just doesn't get it" when it comes to guitar.
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#3
Just play a guitar. Since you are a human being (presumably), emotionality is a constant factor in everything you do, whether or not someone else picks up on it.

Easy version, lol dude just do pentatonic licks with vibrato and bends and make that >< bluse face as you do it.
#4
dont think you have to play super fast
slow it down a bit..
add some nice,in tune bends
and some good,solid vibrato now and then..
and make what your playing your own...
dont try to mimick a certain playing stlye
#5
Quote by Graveworm
Phrasing, bends, vibratos, slow playing, and great soft sound = emotion


Fail. Fast playing can be emotional too, you just don't feel it.

TS: You can teach it, it's something that has to be learned through experience but there is no way you will ever be able to make everyone feel what you're playing all the time; whatever you play there will always be some people who just don't get it.

The best advice anyone can give is to start to really listen to what you're playing, at the minute you're just playing the scales as shapes and collections of notes rather than thinking about what it will sound like before you play. Listen more; your ears are the most important tool you have.

Edit: I will add one other thing: Bends and stupid faces do not an emotional solo make.
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#6
Normally I don't like to be so fuzzy, and of course Graveworm summed up the playing techniques where it really comes down to, but my experience in this is that you must essentially FEEL the emotion you want to express. You must sort of live in to it, otherwise it doesn't work. Actors know what I mean here. It's common practice for them. Musicians do it too, at least those of whom it is said they have 'soul'.
It's a very effective way of putting emotions into your playing, but also it can be quite exhaustive. Living into it can be hard; living out of it even harder.
Luckily you don't have to play sad songs only. For merry songs the same principles apply.
#7
Yep! I always seem to play better if I "let go" and just f-e-e-l it. If I concentraite too much, I get caught up in technique and it lacks that, well, feeling. I hope that makes sense.

Chris
#8
Phrasing is the best way to give something 'emotion'. Music is as much about what you don't play as what you do.
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#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Fail. Fast playing can be emotional too, you just don't feel it.

TS: You can teach it, it's something that has to be learned through experience but there is no way you will ever be able to make everyone feel what you're playing all the time; whatever you play there will always be some people who just don't get it.

The best advice anyone can give is to start to really listen to what you're playing, at the minute you're just playing the scales as shapes and collections of notes rather than thinking about what it will sound like before you play. Listen more; your ears are the most important tool you have.

Edit: I will add one other thing: Bends and stupid faces do not an emotional solo make.


SO, because I said slow playing with HAS more emotion within it than fast playing, I fail?


STFU, you idiot. YOU FAIL.
#10
I think the idea is to play whatever comes into your head....

Try getting better at playing by ear. It's not as hard as you might think, especially for single-note leads.
#11
playing with emotion can either be very fast or very slow, listen to solos and try to feel what they feel,

good guitarists that do this is slash
they both play with emotion in their solos, slash usually has semi-slow solos
as for the fast solos, melodeath bands use play with emotion a lot such as In Flames

Good songs are:
Gunz n Roses- November rain (3:58) or first solo in knocking on heavens door (1:28)

Children of Bodom- Angels dont kill (2nd solo 3:17) or
In Flames- Zombie inc (2:42)

basically its putting meaning into that song, strengthening the message you are sending.
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#12
Quote by Graveworm
SO, because I said slow playing with HAS more emotion within it than fast playing, I fail?


STFU, you idiot. YOU FAIL.


Yes, you fail.

You said "slow playing = more emotion" which is just not true.
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#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Yes, you fail.

You said "slow playing = more emotion" which is just not true.


Yes, you fail.


Fast playing has emotion but not as much as slower playing.
#14
Fast playing usually would express excitement, aggression, confidence etc - things that might be associated with movement, speed, etc.

Kind of hard to express sadness or "the blues" while shredding, but anything is possible I guess.

So in my opinion, different ways of playing can express different feelings.

Generally, using various techniques like vibrato, bends, pinch harmonics, muting, phrasing etc - conveys more perceived feeling to a listener, because it sounds less robotic and more varied and human-like. It's more like human speech and not monotone. Of course a player can learn various techniques and still come of sounding flat. The amount of energy you put into your playing can be perceived by a listener. Technically, there is no actual emotion in music, but the emotions of the performer can effect his performance and that effect can be perceived by the listener. Also a lot depends on the harmonic and melodic content of what is being played.

Tapping into an emotional state and using it in playing can happen more easily when you've reached a level when thinking about the mechanics of playing the instrument is no longer necessary.
#15
The beginner way to start getting more ideas into your music is to think of words that are connotative with a strong emotion while you play.
#16
Thanks for the feedback guys. What exactly is phrasing? because most of the other suggestions I know I can work at, but I'm unsure of what phrasing is. I've heard of it before and know it's important but I don't know much more than that.
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#17
Quote by Trey Spruance
Thanks for the feedback guys. What exactly is phrasing? because most of the other suggestions I know I can work at, but I'm unsure of what phrasing is. I've heard of it before and know it's important but I don't know much more than that.


When you speak, you do not speak non stop, or even in full sentences most of the time. Instead, you use utterances. Then you breath, and say a bit more. While some guitarists can just about pull of a non stop shred solo (Necrophagist ftw \m/) it often helps to put some rests into your solo, or even just hold a note until it dies down a bit to break things up.
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#18
Quote by Graveworm
Yes, you fail.


Fast playing has emotion but not as much as slower playing.


I'm gonna need a citation for that.
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#19
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
I'm gonna need a citation for that.


The Prisoner by Iron Maiden has a solo that perfectly captures the panic and fantic movement of an excaping prisoner in my mind.

If shred is your thing, Far Beyond the Sun by Malmsteen is a beautiful piece of music. If it isn't it may just sound like a mess of notes.
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#20
Quote by Graveworm
Yes, you fail.


Fast playing has emotion but not as much as slower playing.


Actually I find the fast run near the end of For The Love of God by Steve Vai and the first fast run in Waves by Guthrie Govan to be moments of almost unparalleled musical expression.

You cannot say that any playing is more or less "emotional" than any other kind of playing because the emotion is all in the ear of the listener. It's not contained in the music, emotion is born out of the way a piece effects the listener.
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#21
When I was first learning to play blues, someone gave me the Sonny Boy Williams quote about how his idea for tempo and phrasing came from watching the way people or animals walk, relating the physical and emotional sense to how you played. Think of the emotion you are trying to convey when you play it.

Heroin is a great song that demonstrates this concept. Though the Velvet Underground is not everyone's cup of tea, the song demonstrates how tempo and phrasing can be used to convey the emotional journey of the song's protagonist from a slow drone of semi-consciousness to the frantic peak of a heroin high and back down again.
#22
Draw a face like you have to take a huge shit.

Also, more notes per second = more emotion per second. (I forgot who that quote is from)

Basically Don Rickles gave the only correct answer to your question.
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#23
stop being ****ing retards,

EMOTION DOES NOT = SAD

an emotion = a feeling.

is it not possible to feel happy?

play whatever the **** you feel like playing, and it's emotional.

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#24
Quote by xwearesinking
play whatever the **** you feel like playing, and it's emotional.


It's all very well and good saying that but being able to do that takes a huge amount of practice and it's not really something you can teach, you just have to practice and learn from experience.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#25
are you a skinny white boy with no ass?
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#26
Think about something-anything, then try to play it.

Sad, happy, scared. Let the emotion go from your head to your fingers.

My problem is I dont know all the notes to fill in the gaps yet. But from the few scales I do know, I can "talk" with them a bit.
#27
Quote by Axe Murderer
Think about something-anything, then try to play it.

Sad, happy, scared. Let the emotion go from your head to your fingers.

My problem is I dont know all the notes to fill in the gaps yet. But from the few scales I do know, I can "talk" with them a bit.


I see what your saying, but if your playing is truly emotive you won't even be thinking in terms of scales, patterns or even your fingers. You just align your mind with a guitar and the notes in between just fall into place. Sometimes, its the scuffed notes on a Bubber Miley trumpet solo that hit 'home' more than the ones he meant to play.
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#28
Emotion doesn't comes from techniques and genres; it comes solely from the musician and listener.People often think that heavy metal and shred has no feel,but they fail to realize that anger is part of emotion.It's something totally subjective because it depends on the listener.
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#29
Quote by maiden_mexico
are you a skinny white boy with no ass?


skinny and white, yes, but i have a nice ass if i do say so myself.

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