#1
Now after so many failed atempts, I have finally been able to find/start a stable(so far) band. It is a "power trio" which in my oppinion is an ideal setup for a band of our skill level. However now our guitatist wants to add another guitarist. I disagree with him for a number of reasons.

1. For the style of music we play (modern alt/hard rock) most bands either don't have two guitarists or have 2 guitarist playing the exact same thing for 90% of the songs

2. Now I don't know this kid very well, but from what I hear, he's a metal head. Now theres nothing wrong with being a metal head but it may lead to conflicts later on as we are not intrested in playing metal.

3. Now here's the biggest reason. As of now None of us are very good at our respective instruments. However, this is not the case with this other kid. He's incredible. I'm very worried such a drastic difference in skill level will be the end of our band.

So my question our my concerns rational? Help me Ug. and sorry for the long post.
#2
DO NOT... i repeat DO NOT take him.
if his style is different AND hes way better, don take him, youll be ****ed, or youll screw up his reputation.
lose lose for you.


am i demon?
or i am dead??!!
#3
Don't lable dual guitarists as a metal band exclusive. That's not the case. All kinds of great bands use two guitars, including lots of alternative rock. Ever seen Soundgarden, Tool, A Perfect Circle, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, Pearl Jam or System of a Down play live? Well guess what, they double up on guitars very often during concerts, and at all times on the CD.

If you know how to really hear the guitar work on a CD, youll notice all of the bands I mentioned have layers of guitar work. Layers of guitars give songs depth, and make them sound a little bit more... complex, more involved. Even simply having rythym guitar underneath your guitar solos makes the song sound so much better. It's used in metal so much because the two guitarists with often harmonize. You don't need to do that, but reguardless it can only help your sound (provided the person actually knows how to play his instrument).

If he's as good as you say he is, why don't you have a discussion with him about it? What makes you a professional musician more than any theory or lessons is passion and understanding for music and the people who hear it. He'll hear you out if he actually cares. If he doesn't, you'll know.
mmmmmmhmmm

That's exactly what I've been trying to say.

Quote by munkymanmatt
brilliant
#4
Hmmm, that's a toughie.

Well to start with, remember there are three of you in the band, so if the other two want to take on this other guitarist, you really must go with the majority vote.

The next thing to consider is that after the initial jam session, this guitarist may decide that you are all too inexperienced for him and not bother joining you anyway.

But another possibility is that he's planning to train you guys up and improve you up to his own level of playing. I've known a few talented musicians that have done this because they can't find musicians of their own level to put a band together with.
That means you get music lessons for free and because you're all going to be learning in a band atmosphere, you're all gonna get seriously good and tight.
The only thing to watch for is that the music you play is the 'bands' choice, not just his.

Are your concerns rational? Well that depends really.
You mention that you really like the 'power trio' thing and I must concure, I do too and I've played in quite a few different power trios for quite a number of years because I enjoy it so much, but I'm in a four piece band now because I know that this particular line up works extremely well.
Adding this guy could be the best move you ever made, or it could be a mistake, but you'll never know unless you at least give it a go.
So personaly, I think your best decision would be to try him out, and if he decides he'd like to stick around, and if the rest of the band decide they'd like him to stick around, then take him on with the understanding that it is for a trial period of say 6 months, just to see what direction it causes the band to go in, then after that period, if the rest of the band preferred what they were doing as a three piece, you can always let him go with a clear conscience because you will have reserved the right to re-evaluate the situation after 6 months before making a permenant decision.
#5
Quote by frostfire100
Now after so many failed atempts, I have finally been able to find/start a stable(so far) band. It is a "power trio" which in my oppinion is an ideal setup for a band of our skill level. However now our guitatist wants to add another guitarist. I disagree with him for a number of reasons.

1. For the style of music we play (modern alt/hard rock) most bands either don't have two guitarists or have 2 guitarist playing the exact same thing for 90% of the songs


False, like HardAttack said, many bands under that genre have 2 guitarists live and on records.

2. Now I don't know this kid very well, but from what I hear, he's a metal head. Now theres nothing wrong with being a metal head but it may lead to conflicts later on as we are not intrested in playing metal.


Now think of this. He is much better than you, and the genres you and him like are almost similar if you think about it. The only real difference is that he may be lets say use a different tuning, more distortion, guitar solos. The mix of your genre (hard rock, can sometimes be lead up to sound like hardcore) and his genre (metal) can lead up to metalcore (Examples would be All That Remains and Shadows Fall) Those bands have a hard rock and heavy metal sound mixed into each song.

3. Now here's the biggest reason. As of now None of us are very good at our respective instruments. However, this is not the case with this other kid. He's incredible. I'm very worried such a drastic difference in skill level will be the end of our band.

So my question our my concerns rational? Help me Ug. and sorry for the long post.


Like I said, he is better than you, and he may help your band get bigger in the future. If he can play a good guitar solo, all you really have to do is lay down a nice chord progression for the rhythm, if you can make a riff that he can play and he makes a riff you can play you will be fine. Although you all have to agree on whether or not you like the idea of being a metalcore band.
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#6
One thing I've found is that with each new member you add to a band, the band problems grow exponentially. Band practice and gigs are harder to coordinate, arguments are more common place, and there's more disagreement on every single decision you have to make.

If you don't need a second guitarist, don't get one. Yes, rhythm guitar will add more depth and fullness to your live sound, but at what cost? If you guys are happy now then don't break that chemistry by adding someone else.

You should probably give the new guy a shot just so you don't piss your other band mates off. If he ends up causing more trouble than he's worth, then you have a good reason to boot him. If he seems to be a good addition then keep him around. Either way you win.
Last edited by shortyafter at Oct 5, 2008,
#7
If hes way better get him to write stuff above your heads because if you take time to sit down and learn it you will only become better. Which in time your band will kick ass instead of just playing stuff your comfortable there will be barley any improvements. My band used to be pop punk and now were progressive metal only because we worked our asses off to progress.
Referring to Victor Wooten
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"Wa wa wa English is my first language, music is my second blah blah blah wank wank wank I rule, love me suck my dick."

That's all I heard in that entire interview.

My Band:
http://www.myspace.com/closedfortonight
#8
I think im in a similar position (In fact im somewhat worried i am that person)

But I have a mate who is in a band who play rock/punk. They are all respectively still learning their instruments.

And I am somewhat ahead on guitar simply because I have been playing alot longer.

Dont let the term metalhead fool you. Metal is an extremly diverse genre (unless he was more specific i.e death metal/ grindcore guitarist, in which case he probably wont suit you)

Try him out if not just say he is what your looking for