#1
If i'm playing over say a I-IV-V blues progression in A (so A-D-E) can i switch to the corresponding minor pentatonic blues scale as the chord changes?

So i'd play the A minor pentatonic over the A chord, the D minor pentatonic over the D chord and finally the E minor pentatonic over the E chord?

Thanks.
Last edited by geetarmanic at Oct 5, 2008,
#2
That is absolutely fine to do and is encouraged as you'll find if you play the scale to the corresponding chord you will encounter less notes that sound horrible.
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#3
yea you cant do that, but for simplicities sake most people just stay in the A minor pentatonic. however, what sounds nice is if you play the note that corresponds with the chord change as it happens. since all of the chords (ADE) are in the A minor scale.
#4
Quote by geetarmanic
If i'm playing over say a I-IV-V blues progression in A (so A-D-E) can i switch to the corresponding minor pentatonic blues scale as the chord changes?

So i'd play the A minor pentatonic over the A chord, the D minor pentatonic over the D chord and finally the E minor pentatonic over the E chord?

Thanks.

Not really - your key is A minor so you'd play A minor all through. However, what you would do is pay attention to the chord changes and choose your notes accordingly, eg work around the root notes of the chords. Remember all those root notes are part of the A minor scale, that's why using the same scale across all the chords work as long as they're all in the same key...it's the whole point of key-based music.

Changing scale for each chord can sound awkward and disjointed, it's the kind of thing jazz players do to show off because it takes realy skill to make it work.
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#5
Quote by geetarmanic
If i'm playing over say a I-IV-V blues progression in A (so A-D-E) can i switch to the corresponding minor pentatonic blues scale as the chord changes?

So i'd play the A minor pentatonic over the A chord, the D minor pentatonic over the D chord and finally the E minor pentatonic over the E chord?

Thanks.

A Minor Pentatonic ftw. However, it's good to make some slight alterations to this scale over a Blues progression. Essentially, all the chords have a major 3rd in them, so adapt the scale to land on those chord tones, cuz they're very strong chord tones - especially in Blues.

For example, on A7, just every so often emphasize the C#.
On D7, land on the F#.

What might be a good idea is to extend the amount of bars for each chord, just so you can get a feel of how to use the scale over each chord.
#6
Quote by steven seagull
Not really - your key is A minor so you'd play A minor all through. However, what you would do is pay attention to the chord changes and choose your notes accordingly, eg work around the root notes of the chords. Remember all those root notes are part of the A minor scale, that's why using the same scale across all the chords work as long as they're all in the same key...it's the whole point of key-based music.

Changing scale for each chord can sound awkward and disjointed, it's the kind of thing jazz players do to show off because it takes realy skill to make it work.


What I sometimes try and do is to think of the scale, say C major, as the mode that is most relevant to the chord change. If I am playing a bass line to a Cmaj chord, I'll be thinking of C ionian, and then if it moves to a Gmaj, I'd be thinking of G mixolydian. It is essentially the same scale, but I find this thinking in terms of modes makes life that little bit easier once you get an understanding of what modes are down.
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#7
I honestly can't see how that would do anything other than confuse matters horrendously, there's absolutely no reason to bring modes into it...but to each their own I guess
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#8
Quote by gm jack
What I sometimes try and do is to think of the scale, say C major, as the mode that is most relevant to the chord change. If I am playing a bass line to a Cmaj chord, I'll be thinking of C ionian, and then if it moves to a Gmaj, I'd be thinking of G mixolydian. It is essentially the same scale, but I find this thinking in terms of modes makes life that little bit easier once you get an understanding of what modes are down.

you still aren't using modes dude, you're just using the C major scale.

the progression tells you when to bring modes into play. The actual progression can be in the key of D dorian