#1
What is the main thing in funk? What should i listen to get to know it more better. i like things like Good Times by Chic and stuff like that, old school things.
What are the scales used in it or the main "patterns" in order to give that funk feel to a song?
#2
Use of octaves etc, dead notes and a lot of staccato playing
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#3
The main thing to worry about is the syncopation (accents not placed on the 1 2 3 4 count). Often, funk will have accents on an odd 16th note (the "a" or "e"), which gives the real "groove" feel.

Another important part, but not as necessary, is the use of slap and pop. If you don't know how to do those, I'm sure there is a thread in here about how to do that.
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#5
Oh and BTW, Victor Wooten is a great bassist for funk.
Mr. Allan wrote:
This is like saying you're not allowed to jerk off over the girl next door unless you have a license and written permission from her. Which, of course, is bullsh*t
#6
Quote by Lydian_Mode
The main thing to worry about is the syncopation (accents not placed on the 1 2 3 4 count). Often, funk will have accents on an odd 16th note (the "a" or "e"), which gives the real "groove" feel.

Another important part, but not as necessary, is the use of slap and pop. If you don't know how to do those, I'm sure there is a thread in here about how to do that.

Syncopation is accenting the off beat, which includes the 2nd and 4th beat


If you want inspiration for writing a funky sounding bassline, check out James Jamerson, you can hear him on basically any motown record pre 1970s(confirmation anarkee?). Listen to signed sealed delivered I'm yours by Stevie Wonder.
Quote by guitarhero_764
I think you need to stop caring what people think about it. I stayed home all day today and masturbated like 5 times. Fucking blast.

Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
Last edited by ScottB. at Oct 5, 2008,
#7
Quote by ScottB.
Syncopation is accenting the off beat, which includes the 2nd and 4th beat


i needed that explanation but i dont actually fully understand it .like play notes against the beat or between two beats?


Quote by ScottB.
If you want inspiration for writing a funky sounding bassline, check out James Jamerson, you can hear him on basically any motown record pre 1970s(confirmation anarkee?). Listen to signed sealed delivered I'm yours by Stevie Wonder.


thank you for that !
#10
minor 9ths are a big thing in funk but apart from that it's more about phrasing and tone
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#11
Notes literally mean NOTHING in funk. It's all about the rhythm, which is usually a fairly repetitive phrase with the a's and e's accented. For examples, look at Bootsy Collins and Larry Graham. No one has mentioned them and without them there can be no funk. James Brown, Parliament/Funkadelic, Sly and the Family Stone is the trinity of funky goodness.
#12
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Notes literally mean NOTHING in funk. It's all about the rhythm, which is usually a fairly repetitive phrase with the a's and e's accented. For examples, look at Bootsy Collins and Larry Graham. No one has mentioned them and without them there can be no funk. James Brown, Parliament/Funkadelic, Sly and the Family Stone is the trinity of funky goodness.


+indefinate amounts of integers.

Seriously. Rhythm is where it's at.
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#13
no Tower of Power mentioned... hmmm...

they're usually here before Jazzy lays down the Trinity.

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#14
If you gosta tink about numbers and scales, you ain't got no riddim! Funk gotta be fonkay son... just feel it.
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#16
As my jazz teacher often tells my band at school, "Play less white." Thats the secret, you have to play less white.
#17
Quote by rollininrhythm
As my jazz teacher often tells my band at school, "Play less white." Thats the secret, you have to play less white.

+10000
"Comedy's a dead art form. Now tragedy, that's funny." -Bender Bending Rodriguez
#20
Quote by the humanity
no Tower of Power mentioned... hmmm...

they're usually here before Jazzy lays down the Trinity.

Tam, you been sleeping on the job?



No but I actually slept in today

Rocco Prestia for fingerstyle funk (Tower of Power) and to add to Bales list, Louis Johnson of the Johnson Brothers, George Porter Jr of the Meters, Reggie Scalon of the Radiators. And check out the Bamboos as well.

And yes, Scott, James Jamerson did play on most of the pre-1970 Motown singles, though I always consider him more R & B / Soul than funk. But Bob Babbitt was the bass player who played on "Signed Sealed Delivered." Babbitt was the alternate Motown bass player and often was kept in reserve when Jamerson became more and more unreliable during recording sessions.

For actual playing of funk, the best advice I ever got was think about dancing and how people move when they dance. Groove the rhythm. Funk is about shaking your booty. Like George Clinton said, "Free your mind and your ass will follow"