#1
Just wondering what peoples opinions are about the best environment to leave a guitar in after its just been sprayed?
#2
ive never done this before but working with paint the best area id leave it in would be a dry room safe from wind. that way it can dry evenly.
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#3
Quote by TK1
ive never done this before but working with paint the best area id leave it in would be a dry room safe from wind. that way it can dry evenly.

this. the free from wind part is expecially important.
#5
a dry, not-too-cool-not-too-warm environment, so that the finish gets hard, but not brittle.

basement = key
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Shwiggity.
#6
low humidity, extremely clean. like.. obsessively clean. my buddy has a spray-chamber, he puts his guitar in it, sprays it, and closes the door, has a nice fan system inside and like 4 filters to keep any dust out. one little spec will ruin a professional finish.
#7
Quote by LP Addict
low humidity, extremely clean. like.. obsessively clean. my buddy has a spray-chamber, he puts his guitar in it, sprays it, and closes the door, has a nice fan system inside and like 4 filters to keep any dust out. one little spec will ruin a professional finish.


Pretty much.

Key to a good finish is:

Don't paint in less than 65F / 18C conditions. Ideally around 75F / 24C.

Get the item to that temperature, before you start painting.

Allow correct flash (dry) time between coats, not too much, not too little.

Keep the dust out.

Lacquer NEEDS, air movement to cure properly, as the air moves over the item, it helps draw out the solvent, which helps it harden.

Don't force dry things unless you know what you are doing, if you harden the outside of the finish before it's ready, solvent from underneath, will "pop" through, giving you little holes. Bad news.

I have a small down draft spray booth in my shed. Its only 4ft wide by 2ft deep, but it works very well, because I took a long time researching it.

Heating air, is expensive. My booth uses filtered air from my workshop (bit warmer than outside) and Infra Red heaters to cure the paint at whatever temp I decide.

You can use the kind that they sell for Patio's etc, waterproof, therefore fairly vapour proof, so no worries about explosions.

Spray booths use LOTS (meaning, miles more than you would think) of air and this needs to be accounted for.

Because my booth is downdraft (better), it only needs a speed of 50ft per minute of air flowing across it, but when you work out the area, that's 400 cubic feet a minute, 24000 cubic feet an hour, just over 700 cubic meters an hour.

So I have a 12 inch in line duct fan, pulling through filters, that can move 900 cubic feet a minute, on a variable speed so I can slow it down for overnight drying etc.

Really speaking, it should be an explosion proof, squirrel cage type, but with the low amounts of combustible material I use, after the filters, it's pretty safe.

So, there can be something of an investment involved, but it does yield a quality paint job.
#8
Garages and basements are the best, as long as it's not too hot.
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