#1
Hello people, me and my band are recording our first demo in a couple of weeks. I sing backing vocals on our tracks, but I thought it would be nice to incorporate some harmony singing to spice the songs up. As for now, our female vocalist sings the lead parts, and I sing the same thing in a different octave.

I've been reading a bit about it, and how harmonies with the major third, minor third or fifth are common.

Let's say I have a vocal melody that goes:


G:---13-11-9-11-----
D:-----------------11-9


How would I go about to figure out the vocal harmony to it on my guitar? Major third, minor third and fifth, for example.

I don't know much about this, so apologies for sounding a bit slow.

Thanks for any help!

-
Quote by Ichikurosaki
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#3
Quote by Demon Wolf
Hello people, me and my band are recording our first demo in a couple of weeks.
-


music theory will answer your question. unfortunately it will probably take more than a couple of weeks to learn the theory and train your voice.
#4
Tip: Always have the melody over the harmony. If she's singing lower than the guitar, her voice is going to get lost.

Sorry I don't have the time to explain the harmonizing right now (I'm not good at it anyways), so hopefully someone will come in here and help you out.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#5
Find out what key/scale the vocal melody is written in.
In this case, I think it's B Major.
FInd ot which interval each note represents - count three notes up from that interval (a third, the scale will show you whether it is a major or minor) and that note will be a major or minor third.

I hope that makes sense, I know what I'm trying to say, but I'm not sure if I'm making myself clear enough.
#6
Here's how to harmonise anything-

Ok, so you have your scale. We'll do this is C major and A minor first, easier to get a grasp on I suppose.
To harmonise in a major scale, first you need to know the notes in the scale.
So in C, we have-
C D E F G A B C
We measure the distance between two notes by interval. So what is an interval of C to E?
Well, going from C to E is a distance of three notes, so its obviously a third, but what sort of third? We can see that E natural is found in C major but not C minor, so it is a MAJOR third. If it was C to Eb (the third of C minor), it would be a MINOR third. What about if we decide to go from C to G? The note G is found in both C major and C minor. This is a PERFECT interval, because they are found in both major and minor scales. Fifths and Fourths in major and minor scales are always perfect.

Now that you know that, we can harmonise well. A sample melody in C could go-

C G F G A G C

If we want to harmonise that by thirds, we can make a little table.

C D E F G A B C
E F G A B C D E

Now you can easily see that a third above C is E, a third above G is B, all in the key of C.
Now, harmonise the melody using the table-
C G F G A G C
E B A B C B E

That was easy, wasnt it? Now the melody is harmonised in thirds.
This method works in both major and minor keys.
Thirds in A minor-
A B C D E F G A
C D E F G A B C

So there you go, hopefully this helps you harmonise now and in the future.
#7
Quote by Demon Wolf
Hello people, me and my band are recording our first demo in a couple of weeks. I sing backing vocals on our tracks, but I thought it would be nice to incorporate some harmony singing to spice the songs up. As for now, our female vocalist sings the lead parts, and I sing the same thing in a different octave.

I've been reading a bit about it, and how harmonies with the major third, minor third or fifth are common.

Let's say I have a vocal melody that goes:


How would I go about to figure out the vocal harmony to it on my guitar? Major third, minor third and fifth, for example.

I don't know much about this, so apologies for sounding a bit slow.

Thanks for any help!

-
Here rises a problem. Harmonies like that work well with instrumental melodies but not so well in singing harmonies.

Using thirds will be hard to sing because you'll be going out of key half the time (singing melodies should stay relatively diatonic so its easy to sing, unless you're some sort of hawt black jazz singer from like the 30's or 40's).

Using fifths wont work live either because your ear will register that your singing the same thing as her and therefore one of you will sing the others part instead of your own part (once again, unless your a good singer). It may work if you recorded your singing line first without the other singer and than recorded the other singer without you and than put them together digitally.

What you might want to do is read up on some first and second species counterpoint in both parts. This will only take an hour or so. I'll give you a link to a good treatise if you're interested.
#8
A bit late reply, but thanks for the help so far everyone!

I'd really like a link, demonofthenight, I'm always eager to learn more.
Quote by Ichikurosaki
sloth is hacking away feebly at the grass because he is a sloth but he was trying so hard ;_; hes all "penguin im HERE i am here to help you penguin"
#9
i recommend if you're going to be recording harmonies to use reference music. sit down and figure out the notes you're going to be singing, use a piano or a synth and play the music on a keyboard over the song into a "scratchtrack". sing with the keyboard to make sure you hit the pitches properly and do it one track at a time.