#1
Many people these days love customizing there guitars, and one of the most replaced parts, the neck should be replaced properly...

You can not change the neck on a neck thru or a glued in neck unless you route out the old neck and make a bolt on neck pocket although I do not reccomend this.

All diagrams are drawn in MS Paint, I will get up CAD diagrams ASAP...

Do not skip any steps.
I am not responsible if you screw your guitar or void any warranties, this tutorial is here as a guide and is how you should do it.

Scale
The scale is the most important factor in replacing the neck.
You must get the scale right, unless you will have intonation and tuning issues a lot. To get the right scale,
Step 1: On your new neck measure (usually in inches) from the nut to the 12th fret.
Step 2: Double that measurement, this is your scale length. Easy enough?
Your scale length is how far away from the nut your bridge saddles should be.
With the right scale length you can have any neck on your guitar.

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a TOM, string thru
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.

Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut.
Step 3: Put your new neck on, but don't screw it in. If it still has the same neck angle as the old neck screw it in. If it doesn't have the same neck angle, you will need to get that same angle, to do this all you need to do is glue in a shim made of scrapwood or sand the neck pocket down to make the neck angle.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.

If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here

You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a Wraparound Bridge
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.

Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut. If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here
Step 3: Put your new neck on and screw it in.
You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a Strat Hardtail
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.

Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut. If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here
Step 3: Put your new neck on and screw it in.
You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a Strat Tremolo
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.
Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut. If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here
Step 3: Put your new neck on and screw it in.
You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a Floyd Rose, Floyd Rose style bridges
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.

Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut. If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here
Step 3: Put your new neck on and screw it in.
You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!

Replacing a neck on a guitar with a Tele bridge
Step 1: Find your scale length for both your new and old necks.

Step 2: Find out how much you need to change your neck to fit. For example, Say your old neck had a scale length of 25 inches and your new neck has a scale length of 26 inches, you will need to route out either the neck pocket 1 inch towards the bridge, or the wood under the fretboard in your neck 1 inch back towards the nut. If your new necks scale length is shorter than the old necks by 1 inch you will need a 1 inch wide block or shim placed here
Step 3: Put your new neck on and screw it in.
You will most likely need to redrill holes in your neck for the screws.
You may also need to make your neck pocket bigger or add shims so that your neck fits tightly and comfortably.
Screw your neck on and start shredding!


I have probably missed a couple of bridges, if you want one let me know.
If you have any other concerns about replacing your neck post below.
Good Luck!
Last edited by guitarcam123 at Oct 20, 2008,
#2
I have a question for you.

I have a 25 1/2 inch scale neck, but in order to have a 25 1/2 inch scale with the body I'm using, I have the have the neck so far out of the neck pocket I can only use 2 of the 4 bolts.

Do you recommend a neck extension, or a whole new neck, or just relocating the bolt holes on my guitar body?

EDIT: Great tutorial, by the way, it should be sticked.

EDIT: LOL YOU USED MY PIC FOR THE FR ONE.

Ok, I understand the shimming business, but what do I do when only 2 bolts will make their way into the neck. My nottom 2 bolts are so close the bottom of the heel, I'm afraid they will just slit the wood.
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Last edited by Øttər at Oct 5, 2008,
#3
haha yeah i saw your post and it was perfect.
Anyway for the screws, you could use wood filler or whatever and fill in the old holes on the body and then redrill new ones to match up your neck holes
Good Luck!
#4
Ok thanks man. I'll post pics.


I actually already started painting the gap neck, the headstock will be white to match my build .
Enjoi <--- Friend me
Quote by Scowmoo
Otter, you're my new god.
#6
my question is, when u say 12th fret should be the exact middle of the vibrating length..does it mean 'the middle of the 12th fret space'? or the 12th fret-mark (the metal bar)??
#8
Middle of the 12th fret, metal bar. ACtually when you multiply that measure by 2, you wont end up on your bridge even though the answer is technically correct. The little extra is for compensation. Just throwing it out there in case anyone didnt understand why while measuring
#9
thnx man..how much of compensation margin shud be left, in ur opinion, in case ur building a guitar on ur own n have to place the bridge by ur own measurements??
#11
It isnt much, since you have a wide range for the saddles to cover they should reach them easily. Im not sure for a 25.5 scale but here's for a 24 27/32" Martin scale: E compensation is 0.152" (5/32" ish) and e compensation is 0.078" (5/64").

What you can do to find this out easily is if you have a 25.5" guitar:
1- Intonate the guitar properly
2- Measure 25.5" on each string for more precision
3- Measure the exceeding part of the string from the 25.5 mark to the point of contact on the saddle

It doesn't matter which style of bridge you have, the intoantion will be the same within the same scale.

Type of strings will have an influence in intonation also, minimal but not to be overlooked.
Last edited by velly69 at Jan 3, 2010,
#12
got it

now my neck seems to fit an almost exact 25 2/8" scale length according to the position of the 12th fret..is tht even possible? or does this mean the neck is defective?
#14
lrn2 grammar.

First, I made this thread ages ago, there's probably a lot missing since I new a lot less back then.

Second, you measure from the fretboard side of the nut to the middle of the 12th fret, is that how you measured it? If so, what is your guitar? It is possible that the scale length is 25 1/4" but I doubt it.
#15
oh i measured frm the nut to the 12th 'fret-mark' earlier n it was 12 6/8"..frm nut to the 'middle' of the 12th fret it's 12.25, tht's 24.5 whn doubled..does tht sound fine?

im trying to build a guitar of my own n learning the technicalities along the experimentation..so plz pardon the lack of comprehension

and guitarcam123 if by "lrn2 grammar" u meant i need to correct my grammar, then im sorry to disappoint u bro since im frm pakistan n english is no where close to being my everyday language =)

thnx both of u
#16
ok ppl im sorry i hv a confusion again..i jst measured the scale on my morris W-20 vintage acoustic..its abt 25.75" dividing equally at the 12th FRET-MARK n NOT at the middle of the fret space..help help =_=
#17
naxy, guitars come in a very large variety of scale lengths. 25.75 could be a possible scale length, but it is not a regularly used one. I always measure 4 or 5 times to make sure I get the correct length. make sure you are measuring from the leading edge of the nut to the leading edge of the 12th fret.
#18
Quote by Albino_Rhino
I have a question for you.

I have a 25 1/2 inch scale neck, but in order to have a 25 1/2 inch scale with the body I'm using, I have the have the neck so far out of the neck pocket I can only use 2 of the 4 bolts.

Do you recommend a neck extension, or a whole new neck, or just relocating the bolt holes on my guitar body?

EDIT: Great tutorial, by the way, it should be sticked.

EDIT: LOL YOU USED MY PIC FOR THE FR ONE.

Ok, I understand the shimming business, but what do I do when only 2 bolts will make their way into the neck. My nottom 2 bolts are so close the bottom of the heel, I'm afraid they will just slit the wood.


You cant move the neck out. You need to move the bridge.
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#19
Quote by naxy
oh i measured frm the nut to the 12th 'fret-mark' earlier n it was 12 6/8"..frm nut to the 'middle' of the 12th fret it's 12.25, tht's 24.5 whn doubled..does tht sound fine?

im trying to build a guitar of my own n learning the technicalities along the experimentation..so plz pardon the lack of comprehension

and guitarcam123 if by "lrn2 grammar" u meant i need to correct my grammar, then im sorry to disappoint u bro since im frm pakistan n english is no where close to being my everyday language =)

thnx both of u

Well it probably would have been better said, lrn2 spell.
#20
i came into this thread thinking i was going to see photos of someone installing a bolt-on neck.
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#21
understood 'skeet uk', thnk u

@ guitarcam123..n wht r ur views on 'lrn2'?? :P
Last edited by naxy at Jan 4, 2010,
#23
@ guitarcam123

1) spellings r not grammar :P

2) even though i dont even speak the language ur arguing with me on, here r some of my wrong spellings tht ur website for every-kind-of-spellings-used-for-words has meanings for:

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=plz

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=tht

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=im

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=n&page=2

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=u

stp arguin with a non english speaker n get a life tard! :P
#25
Quote by naxy
@ guitarcam123

1) spellings r not grammar :P

2) even though i dont even speak the language ur arguing with me on, here r some of my wrong spellings tht ur website for every-kind-of-spellings-used-for-words has meanings for:

stp arguin with a non english speaker n get a life tard! :P



The way that your typing is like that of a 14 year old girl texting her friends.

lrn2 is just an abbreviation to, in this situation to imitate your bad spelling and like the link says "indicate a n00b's fail"
#26
thing is tht it doesnt even matter how im writing..if im using shorthand for my convenience it shudnt bopther anyone..even if im writing like a 14 yr old would, up in america or the UK, wht shud be appreciated is my english, coming frm a country it's not spoken in..im respecting ur language n ur disrespecting my use of informal shorthand? wht kindness!!
#27
I know I'm not the only one here at UG who dislikes the way you are speaking.

It doesn't matter what your first language is, if you know how to spell most of the words in the English language properly, there is no need to misspell around 1/3 of the words in your post. If you really respected the English language, you would spell as many words as possible right.
#29
naxy: stop typing in shorthand. you went to the trouble to learn English, so type it properly. it's very hard to read your shorthand. save it for instant messaging and texting your friends.

everyone else: read the god damn date before you post.