#1
A lot of the time when I see videos of drummers recording their parts... the guitar and bass are already there. It seems that the bands take a click, record the guitar and bass perfectly to the click, and then the drums come last?

Is this common / a smart thing to do? Does this cause the drums to have a more "live" sound?

Or does this just not happen? If people do this, what are the benefits?
#2
I can't record guitar to a click, to another guitar, to a bass, to the sound of wet socks swabbing the insides of skulls or anything. Drums, pl0x.
#3
That's probably because each artist is able to record his or her part on their own, then they combine it in post production. Either that, or they work off a rough cut of the track and a click track so that there's some degree of similarity. Obviously, they mute their own part. It's an issue of time, not sound quality.
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#4
i think bass should always be recorded last. its like a bridge between the drums and guitar and after hearing the guitar and drum parts without bass it could make you more aware of what should be played there and what would sound best.
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#5
Quote by Gordita Supreme
A lot of the time when I see videos of drummers recording their parts... the guitar and bass are already there. It seems that the bands take a click, record the guitar and bass perfectly to the click, and then the drums come last?

Is this common / a smart thing to do? Does this cause the drums to have a more "live" sound?

Or does this just not happen? If people do this, what are the benefits?


Normally the drums are recorded first but there isn't a set order and so anyone can record to a click track although it is harder to do for most people...

Also sometimes the drum track will be there but they may mute it and track other parts to a click. This is usually done if the drummer records a "Scratch" just to give the other members a starting beat to jam to for their parts. At the end the drummer will re=record his track and fix any mistakes.
#7
I have recorded many ways. Its what works best for you. I record bands and it depends. I have the band play all at once, looking (hearing) for that great drum take. If by chance they all play great then I have it all. But usually someone goofs. But I try for the best drum take first. But the beauty of multi-track recording is, if say the guitarist had a great 1st take. Then I can use it and he can still play again until the drums are good and I still will use his 1st take in the mix. Now when I record myself (I play all my own instruments). I load a drum loop (I hate click tracks, to annoying), lay down the guitar tracks and then replace the loop with real drums. The vocals are the last thing I do. Really there are too many variables. Like I said, what works best for you
#8
You can record scratch tracks, and then have a drummer play along for his/her parts. The trick is to make sure to use a metronome.

I have recorded drums over top of guitar and bass and vocal tracks that were not done to a metronome, and then time-aligned the drum tracks to fit in the places where they wandered a bit, but it is a huge pain in the arse. I wouldn't advise it unless it is your only option.

The more the drummer can be a leader rather than a follower, the better.

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