#1
Short version of the wall below: what book should I buy about music theory?

Long version:

Hi, I'm a junior in high school and I plan to major in music theory when I get to college. I don't have a wonderful understanding of theory, but I have enough to compose at the very least a short, improv solo (and keep it interesting) when I play with my schools Jazz band.

I would really like to get a head start in learning theory though, so when I get to college I won't be totally thrown off by all the new ideas. I've checked around for teachers in my area, and no one so far who has a deep understanding of theory is available to teach me. There is one gentleman left, whom I'm going to ask tomorrow, but I would still like a book to read as in school I sometimes have quite a bit of downtime and at home when I'm not doing homework (I'm taking a college equivalent course and it involves a lot of reading/homework) I'm playing guitar or studying theory online. But I'd still like a book, as I can carry it with me and study from it/reference it wherever I may be, provided I have it.

Anyone know any books about theory that are not exceptionally complicated? I was looking at this book, but I didn't know if there were any other, better options.
#2
You play in a jazz band so you must know something. What do you have a good understanding of so far?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#3
Quote by metal4all
You play in a jazz band so you must know something. What do you have a good understanding of so far?


I know how to read music, and I can figure out chords but I usually have to bring my music home and use a website to figure out the positions if they're far off from anything I know. I'd really like to better my knowledge of scales, how chords are built and especially how to change keys and when to stop playing in x type of scale and start playing in y. Idk if that makes sense, I just want the basics really. I wouldn't mind reading a few chapters of stuff I already know. Also if someone could suggest a book that is a tad bit more advanced than beginner but not scholar level that would be great, because I'm planning to read as much as I humanly can.
#5
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina? Lol that books very shred oriented, but I don't know many others. Don't get the Blitz Books/Master Your Theory series, thats classical theory and if you ask me classical theory (atleast in Australia) is shit, you don't learn much useful stuff till grade 4, except for transposition.
#6
Quote by Myung-trucci
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina? Lol that books very shred oriented, but I don't know many others. Don't get the Blitz Books/Master Your Theory series, thats classical theory and if you ask me classical theory (atleast in Australia) is shit, you don't learn much useful stuff till grade 4, except for transposition.


classical theory tends to be a lot more concerned about really writing things down.
How do i group these notes together? do I need a tie here?
In my opinion (at least in Australia) any theory can contribute to a great all round musician
#7
Quote by mdwallin
Theory for the contempory guitarist - guy capuzzo - Hal Leonard Publishing

****ING AWESOME BOOK!!!


Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina? Lol that books very shred oriented, but I don't know many others. Don't get the Blitz Books/Master Your Theory series, thats classical theory and if you ask me classical theory (atleast in Australia) is shit, you don't learn much useful stuff till grade 4, except for transposition.


I will look at both those, thanks guys . The shred one sounds like a bridge I may try to cross later though haha, I kinda "plateaued" for a month or two and I'm starting to improve again, but I'm nowhere near the super shredding skills I want haha. Maybe a few more months

And writing stuff down I'm not too concerned about, 6 years of reading trombone has given me the ability to write things how I want the beat to be, I just don't know what note goes where to make the music say what I want it too, ya know?

Thanks for all the help guys, keep the suggestions coming! Like I said, some novice books now and move harder and harder as I go. If I could sit through my first few theory classes and already know everything that's been taught I'd feel pretty damn good
#9
Hello, I am new here!

Here are a couple of books that I've used to teach my beginning and internediate students about theory that is focused on guitar:



The Advancing Guitarist

Veteran musician and educator Mick Goodrick presents practical information for guitarists who want to improve their playing technique and style and simply become better musicians. Rather than a step-by-step method book, the information is presented in a general essay format, discussing ways that the various techniques covered may be applied by the advancing guitarist to enhance his/her own style of playing, some of the areas discussed include: basic fingerboard mechanics * modes, scales and chords * contemporary harmony * harmonica and overtone influences * being self-critical * improvising short pieces * different playing situations.

That can be supplemented by this book:



The most complete book on scales and modes ever written. An encyclopedia with over 6,000 diagrams, charts and graphs. Complete explanation of all 5,6,7, and 8 tone scales and modes. The essential volume for every guitarist's library.

This book is a "where to" book, showing you exactly where to find any scale in any key on your fretboard. It is a professional reference tool to enhance your music library and playing that you will use for many years to come.

I hope that helps. I myself enjoyed these books and go back to them time to time for reference.