#2
locking and double locking I believe just refers to the fact that your tuning will lock meaning it stays in tune alot longer than standard, floating tremolo is like a floyd rose or Edge basically you can do any kind of whammy tricks because the floating trem will loosen the strings giving you a great effect.

Anyone can correct me if I am wrong here
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#3
double locking tremolo locks at both nut and bridge e.g. floyd rose

vintage tremolo probably means the one on a strat, it's a 6-screw pivot with bent-steel saddles

floating tremolo means it's not screwed tight to the top of the guitar, and is held in its place by the tension in the strings (in combination with the springs)... you can raise and lower pitch with a floating trem...

locking... it depends. sometimes people use it instead of double locking to save typing out the word "double", lol, but sometimes it means a single locking trem, which only locks at the nut (i think), not at both nut and bridge. not as good as double-locking, basically.
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#4
Quote by Dave_Mc
double locking tremolo locks at both nut and bridge e.g. floyd rose

vintage tremolo probably means the one on a strat, it's a 6-screw pivot with bent-steel saddles

floating tremolo means it's not screwed tight to the top of the guitar, and is held in its place by the tension in the strings (in combination with the springs)... you can raise and lower pitch with a floating trem...

locking... it depends. sometimes people use it instead of double locking to save typing out the word "double", lol, but sometimes it means a single locking trem, which only locks at the nut (i think), not at both nut and bridge. not as good as double-locking, basically.


Pretty much this, but cos I'm here, I might as well add a few details

Double-locking (aka Floyd Rose) trems clamp the strings between the nut and at the bridge, meaning the string cannot move once locked and while whammying, so it stays in tune. Can be a bitch to set up correctly, though.

Vintage trems are easy to set up even if you don't use them. You can only whammy down with a Strat trem. Friction at the nut can cause it to go out of tune with use, hence why the Floyd Rose exists.

Floating trems rest on a knife edge (very thin metal plate) at the guitar body and are balanced precisely by the string and spring pressures. Pretty much the same as a Floyd, as non-locking versions of this aren't really stable. With these, you can whammy up and down.

You can also get semi-floating trems like the Ibanez ZR and Edge Zero, where the trems don't float completely freely; they have a device called a Zero Point System that brings them back to their 'zero point' to ensure they stay in tune. This means they're not true floating trems, even though you can whammy up and down.

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Last edited by quantum leap at Oct 7, 2008,
#5
Quote by quantum leap
(a) Vintage trems are easy to set up even if you don't use them. You can only whammy down with a Strat trem. Friction at the nut can cause it to go out of tune with use, hence why the Flyod Rose exists.

(b) You can also get semi-floating trems like the Ibanez ZR and Edge Zero, where the trems don't float completely freely; they have a device called a Zero Point System that brings them back to their 'zero point' to ensure they stay in tune. This means they're not true floating trems, even though you can whammy up and down.


(a) that's not true, you can set up a strat trem to float too.

(b) good point.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
(a) that's not true, you can set up a strat trem to float too.

(b) good point.


Yeah, you're right, but I was just talking about normal trems; when you think about it, setting up a Strat trem like that comes more under 'floating' anyways.

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#7
Double locking means that it locks at the bridge saddles and at the nut. The Floyd rose and the Ibanez ZR are the two main examples. they can be set up to float (pull up and down on the bar) or can be set flush to the body. Another lesser-known example is the Super Vee.

A vintage tremolo has six screws holding it in place, and is used for light vibrato, otherwise it goes out of tune. Hence, the Floyd Rose, and the Super Vee.

Floating simply means it is held at a parallel by the strings and the springs in the back of the guitar. Any tremolo can be set up to float provided it is a fulcrum tremolo. A few common examples are the Fender American Standard Tremolo, and the Gotoh/Wilkinson Vs100.

A locking tremolo can be either double locking (see section on double locking trems), or single locking. Some floyd roses are like that, mainly cheaper ones. An example that is not based on the vintage tremolo design is the Kahler tremolo. Instead of having fixed saddles at the bridge, it has rollers which the strings roll over. It also pivots on a cam and ball bearings, similarly to the Ibanez ZR tremolo, instead of knife edges. The Kahler does go out of tune with string bending though.
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#8
Quote by quantum leap
Yeah, you're right, but I was just talking about normal trems; when you think about it, setting up a Strat trem like that comes more under 'floating' anyways.


yeah, but i was under the impression that strat trems were "meant" to be set up to float?
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah, but i was under the impression that strat trems were "meant" to be set up to float?

No, ideally they should be flush with the body. With strat style trems that pretty much means you shouldnt be able to pull up.
#10
i was under the impression that leo meant for them to be set to float... i'm nearly certain i read that somewhere. EDIT: actually, i think you're right, it says on wiki that original strats were shipped with 5 springs...
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Thanks for the answers, and no smart@$$ reponses.

So a bridge on a, say, Razorback would be a Double locking floyd rose right?

Vintage trems dont stay in tune, but locking trems do stay in tune, right?
#12
Quote by TatarSalad2
Thanks for the answers, and no smart@$$ reponses.

So a bridge on a, say, Razorback would be a Double locking floyd rose right?

Vintage trems dont stay in tune, but locking trems do stay in tune, right?


Depends how hard you whammy. Under extreme whammying, Floyds are far more stable than Vintage trems, but Vintage trems can last well with only light vibrato (pro tip: rub graphite in the nut grooves/ replace the plastic nut with a graphite one and see your tuning stability soar).
No trem is perfect, though. Floyds will eventually go out of tune, it just takes longer than Vintage trems.
And yes, Razorbacks have double-locking floating trems, i.e. Floyds, like most Ibanez guitars with trems (though the S has the semi-floating ZR and some of the RG Prestiges have the Edge Zero) and many other superstrat guitars.
Also, +1 to the Vintage trem being flush with the body. Every Strat I've seen has had a flush-set trem.

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Last edited by quantum leap at Oct 7, 2008,
#13
also, i'd say it depends on the quality of the floyd. some of the cheaper floyds are terrible. i'm not sure of the quality of the one on that dean.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#14
I just bought a 2nd-hand S470qxdm last week and have been enjoying learning how to use and set up the ZR system.

You can also get semi-floating trems like the Ibanez ZR and Edge Zero, where the trems don't float completely freely; they have a device called a Zero Point System that brings them back to their 'zero point' to ensure they stay in tune. This means they're not true floating trems, even though you can whammy up and down


It is possible to remove a piece that is crucial to the Zero Point System to make ZR trems completely float. I'm not sure why one would do this -- although it would reduce the tension on the whammy bar, wouldn't it be really difficult to actually play in tune without the trem balancing at the "zero point"? The pitch would wobble all over the place ...
#15
Quote by quantum leap
Yeah, you're right, but I was just talking about normal trems; when you think about it, setting up a Strat trem like that comes more under 'floating' anyways.


my first guitar was a strat and to make them float is simole but then u gotta tweak the neck and all the other crap, you might as well leave it as a hardtail. i have an s470 (love it) but still wanted a string thru and set neck hardtail so i bought the top of the line middle of the road ltd. love it just as much as my 470. the only thing catching my eye now is the new rg3550m because i cant find a rg2550 to save my life. basically the same guitars but 2550 is much cheaper. both 24 fret prestiges with edge trems
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#16
plus your action will be messed up on a strat if you float it, thats what i meant by having to tweak the neck. how much can that truss rod and neck actually take depending on how much float you want. i used to think hard tails were for younger players who didnt know how to setup a doubl lock until i found my ltd thats a week old and i havent had to tune it yet. if you have a double lock set it up once by yourself and you'll b fine....
"live to play, play to live"

05' ibanez s470qxdm
06' jackson dk2 pro series
peavey VK112 50watt
behringer x-Vamp-(soon to be digiT. rp500,
peavey vk120 watt half stack,

(debating on either s or rg prestige)
#17
*reported*

old thread is old. And a bit mouldy.
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