#1
I'm getting into jazz (got a teacher, although it's moving slowly), and i've been reading up on thinking of chords in terms of their individual keys instead of thinking of what keys they'd fit into, but i have a problem.

I was reading about playing over jazzy progressions with key changes and all that, and how to simply play a scale (although you probably hate that word) over each chord that will fit with its qualities, and it seems like that will all work. however, when playing over a simple progression like a ii V I in the key of C (which is what i'm doing with my teacher right now), i don't know how to play over it without it sounding like i'm playing boring notes that simply 'fit'. If I were to play the most obvious choices over each chord, i'd play a D Dorian over the ii, a G Mixolydian over the V, and a C major scale over the I. However, as these all fit into the same key, everything i'm playing simply sounds like i'm just playing the C major scale over some chords in the key of C.

How do i make a chord progression that isn't really 'jazzy' sound jazzy? (and i'm hoping it won't have to involve spicing up the chords, because my teacher is planning on using the same simple progression)
#2
When I play over a ii V I in jazz, I'll usually use chromatics to get me where I'm going...

But that's kinda cheating, I think.
#3
well, jazz has a habit of making really simple stuff sound complex, so yes, when you hear all the modes and stuff, its just playing the same scale.

as for spicing it up, a common way is to isolate the chords and just solo over those chords.

e.g. D minor scale over Dmin chord, G major scale over G chord, resolving to C major.

it means you're still playing the right thing (as in not clashing with the chords), but its keeping it interesting because of the outside notes involved. For example the F# in G major is the tritone (bad-sounding note) of C major, hence there will be tension if you play it in the G major section (but it won't be clashing) and then resolve that when you get back to C major.

i.e, it will sound good.

there's a bunch of ways to keep things interesting (that arent too complex), but that method is my personal favourite.
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#4
Hey Glen hope this helps Try and emphasize the fact that when you are playing D Dorian (for example) it's D Dorian and not C major starting from D (even though it is). That might be a little confusing, what I mean is, playing in C major, you always return to the note C, lots of notes resolve to it, so when playing in Dorian, resolve to D, it will sound interesting, also try playing notes from outside the scale or change the scale completely. Like if you play D phrygian over the ii chord it will sound like you've changed key. It would help if you play over a min7 chord too to avoid note clashes, unless that's what you like.
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#5
Obviously try and play chord tones on the 1st and 3rd beats always so you keep the swing feel and it doesn't sound like scale noodling. Also you can use alterations over the V chord by using tritone substitution and play for example in C maj, a Db triad over the V chord if you alter it. This works for any key, just use that chromatic downward motion. Also try chromatically connecting each chord with ascending and descending chromatic lines leading to strong tones.
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#7
Quote by Glen'sHeroicAct
How do i make a chord progression that isn't really 'jazzy' sound jazzy? (and i'm hoping it won't have to involve spicing up the chords, because my teacher is planning on using the same simple progression)

Have a nose at this.

http://www.shredacademy.com/lessons/OTHER/n_kellie1.htm
#8
well, jazz has a habit of making really simple stuff sound complex, so yes, when you hear all the modes and stuff, its just playing the same scale.
just because you dont understand jazz conventions

Not going too deep into modes because I think you got it. Just remember you dont have to dorian over ii chords and mixolydian over V chords and Ionian over I chords. You can play any minor mode over ii chords (preferably dorian and aeolian but potentially phrygian works too) and any major mode over I chords (lydian or ionian, functioning I and IV chords are sort of restrictive).
At your stage you cant really play anything other than mixolydian over fdominant chords (functioning and non-funtioning). Later, you will have a choice of superlocrian (best used over non-funtioning dominant chords), lydian dominant, mixolydian b6 and phrygian dominant (I think I missed a choice...). The last two should only be used over funtioning V chords in a V-i progression.

Try to use chromatics, especially over dominant chords (any chord thats functioning as a V chord). m7-M7-8ve chromatics work really well over dominant chords, thats F F# G over a G chord. Some guys like 5 - m6 - M6 chromatics over major chords (I and IV chords).

Alot of accidentals. b5ths will always be your safe bet, especially over minor and dominant chords. Alot of guys use their accidentals just before the stressed beats, which usually means the weakest beat and therefore the beat you can do pretty much anything over.
Try not to use accidentals on strong beats (1st in 3/4 and 1st and 3rd in 4/4). Its best to use pentatonic notes on these beats (you should have noticed that minor pentatonic notes are used in each diatonic minor mode and major pentatonics are used in each diatonic major and dominant mode).

Syncopation might be handy too as long as it doesnt get obnoxious, so dont over use it. This just means you stress a usually unstressed beat or you play slightly behind or infront of the beat (I think thats still syncopation). Basically its when you do something rhthymically unexpected.

Also keep in mind jazz solos are VERY similar to blues solos, especially with concerns to phrasing. You should still phrase your phrases like a singers voice. Listen to miles davis and john coltrane (their modal era stuff). I would recommend more, but I only really listen to bebop. Good luck getting phrasing ideas from that.

Have fun.