#1
Ive heard alot of people say that the Key of Bb major is like the "forbidden key" for most guitarists but i don't understand why.

anyone care to enlighten me? thanks in advance!
#3
I don't see what the issue is.... but I did play trombone where Bb is more at home than C major

its just a slightly less "guitar friendly" key.... just think how many guitar based songs are written in E minor
the fingerings for Bb major don't exactly perfectly line up with the dots and such like some other keys do.... but really, I don't see what the issue is
#4
Actually Bb, along with any other key is very easy to see on the guitar. The guitar is completely patterns. Anyway, i have no idea what the thread starter is talking about
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#6
I think possibly you're getting Bb Major confused with Eb Major. Eb Major is a horrible key for guitarists because of the chords involved. You can't play open chords, it's all bar chords, and your root position is A string 6th fret. You basically can't play any of the strings open because the notes that the strings are tuned to aren't in key, and one of the easy things about guitar is being able to play open notes. So for playing scales it's not really any harder than other keys, but for riffing and playing chords it's a bitch.
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#7
Quote by disillusia
Ive heard alot of people say that the Key of Bb major is like the "forbidden key" for most guitarists but i don't understand why.

anyone care to enlighten me? thanks in advance!
Most flat keys are a bitch because we cant play in open positions. But really smart guitarists can play up and down the fretboard.
#9
I think they may be referring to the sound of it and maybe not the difficulty of playing it.

Some things just sound better because of the physics of the instrument. Like how the open E minor that is used in everything sounds so good.
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I wanna know what some blues sounding chords I could use in the key of D Aeolian fifth mode of Melodic Minor.

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try looking for Cm, or any of those complicated jazz chords
#10
It's not "forbidden," but don't expect many riffy metal songs to be in Bb. But it's easy enough to play chords and leads. And of course you could put a capo on the first fret and make it a lot easier.
#12
perhaps tune your guitar down, eradicate the problem of no open strings?
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#13
Quote by matt92l
perhaps tune your guitar down, eradicate the problem of no open strings?


Or you could...practice.
#15
Most metal and rock is in Am and Em, sometimes F#m. The open A and E strings mean that playing in A and E is logically easier. I never write in A and E, I write in Gm, F#, Bb, C#, and various other more uncommon keys-it sounds a bit different which can be cool.
#16
I guess it may be the case if you've only mastered your open chord shapes, b flat being so difficult and all...

Try playing Zz flat (half diminished), now thats a tricky one...
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#17
Quote by rollininrhythm
Or you could...practice.


Practice all you like, it won't help you with those open chord voicings.
#18
Quote by Don Rickles
Practice all you like, it won't help you with those open chord voicings.


It will improve your ability to create voicings that don't rely on open strings.
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#19
Quote by Don Rickles
Practice all you like, it won't help you with those open chord voicings.


Well, as I see it, an open E voicing is 1 5 8 10(3) 12 15, and a closed Bb on the A string is voiced 1 5 8 10(3) 12.

So more or less the same voicing.
#20
Well, Paul Gilbert mentioned it in the interview that's on the main page today. He didn't go in-depth but mentioned it in the second part of this question. Here's what he did say:

Quote by Paul Gilbert
“Bronx 1971” is tonally a little bluesier; the feel of the track is a little different. Where did that come from?

It came from two things: The first inspiration was I bought a Boss pedal called Bass Synth and of course it’s for bass but it works for the lower strings of the guitar. And I plugged it in and messed around with it for a little bit andjust got this envelope filter sound and immediately started playing the riff. The sound inspired that riff.

The other thing is I really wanted to write a song in Bb just ‘cause I hadn’t before and Bb is a key that all guitar players are scared of. And I thought there must be something good about B flat and if you played a Bb blues scale, E is in that scale, it’s a tritone. A tritone is a fun note to play with so I used a lot of that in that song where the very first note in that song is actually E; then it ascends up to the Bb. So it’s just a way of exploring Bb and it was a lot of new territory. And I must admit over the past couple months whenever I have a spare moment I sit down with the guitar and just improvise in Bb because there’s a lot of improvisation in that song. And I want to get to know the neck because most guitar players including me, when you first start to play in Bb, you’re lost! I can play in sixth position but anywhere else, “Where the hell am I?” And that’s been a really fun challenge and it’s increased my vocabulary a lot sort of having to relearn the neck just playing in this weird key.
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#21
I never knew Bb was a 'forbidden' key... granted it is more difficult than something like E minor, but I've played a lot in Bb and thought nothing of it.