#1
I've been playing for almost a year (started end of november) and I've just now decided to learn scales, can i go about this by learning the notes from a scale one string at a time. For Instance
E||--20----17----16----15----|--12----10----8----5----|--3----0----||

Thats part of the C Major Pentatonic scale, I think.. Thanks for the answers in advance
#3
I think you should learn the notes on the whole fretboard first. That's what I did. It took some time though
#4
Quote by Rave765
I think you should learn the notes on the whole fretboard first. That's what I did. It took some time though

are you saying like E F F# G... and so on?
#5
Learn all the notes on the fretboard first, it's worth the hard work and makes it a hell of alot easier to learn scales
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#7
Quote by mightmuffin
Learn all the notes on the fretboard first, it's worth the hard work and makes it a hell of alot easier to learn scales


Either that or get a list of scales for you to practice with, Learn a few at a time and see where that takes you.
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#9
Quote by tgrillo
DO NOT listen to these nerds. You are far better off learning the scale the way you proposed. Learning the patterns and just realizing the guitar is a BIG PATTERN will help you. Alot of professional guitarists don't even know the fretboard. Alvin Lee wrote in an interview that he doesn't know any notes past the 8th fret on his guitar. He plays specifically with patterns. Only nerds THINK about playing notes. True improvisation and playing comes from muscle memory and a good ear, as well as learning from past playing what DOES and DOES NOT sound good. Sonny Landreth said it best when he said that you "have to have a built in crap-detector that just tells you when something isn't any good". Only nerds who know scales waste the time to THINK about what WILL sound good before they play it. Coincidentally, it all sounds like shit. Nerds.

The guitar is a series of patterns, not this nerd instrument these guys make it out to be. Learn finesse and patterns on the fretboard to get more comfortable with the guitar.

Seriously, you guys should pick up the violin. Stop telling people to learn notes first then try to form scales. All of the greats learned from playing songs they heard on the radio or records, then getting comfortable with the pentatonic/minor scales (BY LEARNING PATTERNS) to play their own stuff. Eric Clapton sure as hell didn't learn every note for every fret on every string of the guitar, like some nerd.

Nerds

You're an idiot

The guitar is a musical instrument, true improvisation and playing comes from having a good understanding of music and good ears.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 7, 2008,
#10
Its true that you don't need to learn scales and modes to play a guitar.

Do you need to know every word in the English Language to express what you want to say.... probably not.

Some people get along with their life using a limited vocabulary.


NOW, having saying that.


What scales and modes do is expand your musical vocabulary so you can phrase your music different ways. Anything that relates to understanding your instrument will add to your music vocabulary, be it Theory, repetoire and techniques. It's nice to know all the notes on the neck because it gives you a different perspective other than a bunck of dots and lines.

Here is a list of Scales and modes that will be useful to all guitarists in the beginning to the professional level. I suggest you google these:

Minor Pentatonic (blues scale)

Major Pentatonic (blues scale)

Ionian (Major Scale)

Dorian (Minor mode popularized by players like Santana)

Phrygian (Minor mode with a spanish feel, one of my faves)

Lydian (Major mode used extensively by players like Steve Vai)

Mixolydian (Dominant 7th mode with a jazzy feel)

Aeolian (Natural Minor mode, the most used and easily played minor mode)

Locrian (Half diminished, one of my faves)

Harmonic Minor (Exotic minor sclae with a middle eastern feel)

Atered Dominant (Don't try this at home, Only for professionals like me)


I hope that list helps.
#11
Quote by Olipticle
Either that or get a list of scales for you to practice with, Learn a few at a time and see where that takes you.


I say, learn one scale first, start with box positions for instance the A blues
|5-|--|--|8-|
|5-|--|--|8-|
|5-|--|7-|8-|
|5-|--|7-|--|
|5-|6-|7-|--|
|5-|--|--|8-|

The fives use your first finger (index)
the six use your 2nd finger (middle)
the sevens use your 3 finger (ring)
and the eights use your 4th finger (pinky)

Then slowly start expanding on it
#12
Here, listen IMHO this is the best method to progress.
Learn the CMajor Scale or pick your favorite scale, I picked A Pentatonic MInor, memorize the pattern and get to the point where you can make small riffs off of that (only the highlighted notes not even open notes), then start adding in open strings then add in notes from frets 1-12 from one string at a time, then once you feel comfortable and know where all the notes of a scale are in the first half of the guitar, just move your fingers up 12 frets and you'll play the same note AGAIN! This method is most helpful because you're force to memorize note names, how to move up patterns (transpose) and you kinda develop your creativity, I mean if i gave you the position of every note for the A Minor Pentatonic scale and told you to make something up it would be daunting, but if you slowly incorporate more and more choices it gets easier due to practice.
Also try to learn some basic theory from this method like 5ths, 4ths, 8th intervals, this will IMMENSELY help you with chords. I've been doing the A Minor Pent for a month now and I just started the E Minor scale and D# Blues Pentatonic scale

C Major MOVEABLE PATTERN
|-10-12-13--|
|-10-12-13--|
|-9-10-12--|
|-9-10-12--|
|-8-10-12--|
|-8-10-12--|

A Pentatonic Minor MOVEABLE Pattern
|-5--8--|
|-5--8--|
|-5--7--|
|-5--7--|
|-5--7--|
|-5--8--|
#14
and the real way is? stick the guitar up your ass right for amplification right?
#15
Quote by tgrillo
just stop being nerds and learn to play the guitar the real way

The guy asked for help, you're not helping...go play in the Pit.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#16
"Only nerds THINK about playing notes."

Oh wow. So what, you just slap your hands on the fretboard and play whatever comes out?

lololol

anyway, heres my patterns from another post

Oh and here's what I think you really wanted:

C Major scale:

|--------------------------------------------------7--8-10------
|-------------------------------------------8-10----------------
|---------------------------------7--9-10-----------------------
|-----------------------7--9-10---------------------------------
|-------------7--8-10-------------------------------------------
|------8-10-----------------------------------------------------

Or the easier (for me at least) 3 notes per string set

|--------------------------------------------------------------10--12--13------
|--------------------------------------------------10--12--13------------------
|---------------------------------------9--10--12------------------------------
|----------------------------9--10--12-----------------------------------------
|-----------------8--10--12----------------------------------------------------
|------8--10--12---------------------------------------------------------------

Note that this goes up to F and is considered an extended range scale, because F is in the C major scale.

C minor:

|---------------------------------------------------7--8-10-11------
|---------------------------------------------8--9--------------------
|-----------------------------------7--8-10--------------------------
|----------------------------9-10------------------------------------
|-----------------8-10-11-------------------------------------------
|------8-10-11------------------------------------------------------

The C minor three note per string is a tad complicated to explain, but you can figure it out if your patient.

C Major Pentatonic:

|----------------------------------------8-10------
|---------------------------------8-10-------------
|---------------------------7--9--------------------
|--------------------7-10--------------------------
|-------------7-10---------------------------------
|------8-10----------------------------------------

C Pentatonic Blues:

|------------------------------------------------8-11------
|-----------------------------------------8-11-------------
|------------------------------8-10-11--------------------
|-----------------------8-10-------------------------------
|-------------8--9-10--------------------------------------
|------8-11------------------------------------------------

IMPORTANT SHIT TO REMEMBER WHEN DOING THIS!

ALWAYS say the notes in your head whilst playing along with these scales. Start with the C major because there are no sharps or flats, it just goes from C back to C. Just say it aloud when you play the scales.

The major pentatonic should be next, since its the same set of notes, but arranged so that there are 5 notes per octave, namely in the case of C major they are C D E G A.

The idea of practicing scales and such is to learn about intervals more than anything. Thats the important thing to grasp of understanding scales. A Major scale has a different interval structure compared to a minor pentatonic scale. And you can figure it out, it just takes some time.

Most scales are based off of the major. Its pattern of steps (intervals) is WWHWWWH where w = whole step (two guitar frets) and h = half step (one guitar fret).

This is just a taste of theory (i guess?) there are many good well reviewed guides on UG's lesson section (look at the top of the page)
#17
I didn't really know anything about scales untill I made this post, scales are a group of notes that you can play anywhere on the fretboard, as long as you're playing the right notes, right like C D E F G A B? So if i learned the notes for each fret, then it would actually make this alot easier wouldn't it? hope so cause I started learning the notes after the 4th post
Last edited by goodeyesniper90 at Oct 8, 2008,
#18
Quote by tgrillo
just stop being nerds and learn to play the guitar the real way



You know what,
Check your emails. Idiot.
Been away, am back
#19
Quote by goodeyesniper90
I didn't really know anything about scales untill I made this post, scales are a group of notes that you can play anywhere on the fretboard, as long as you're playing the right notes, right like C D E F G A B? So if i learned the notes for each fret, then it would actually make this alot easier wouldn't it? hope so cause I started learning the notes after the 4th post


Just learn the notes on the low-e and A string. From there just learn octaves to find the rest. Remember, the notes on the low-e and high-e use the same pattern.

http://www.folkblues.com/theory/octaves.htm