#1
Hi,
I would like to know what are the amp class. I know there's A, B, AB but what does it does to the sound exactly? Also, is there anyway I could find what amp is in wich class? And is class A better than B? Is the Fender Twin Reverb Reissue 65 a class A amp??

Thanks
#2
There are classes???
Lets jump in a pool


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Last edited by I am wet : Today at 03:26 XM.
#4
i dont think they make class B guitar amps, but i could be wrong. i really only see things that are class A or class A/B.

as for what it means, its how the circuit amplifies the input signal. class A is less efficient but a simpler circuit, while class A/B is more efficient but also more complex. sound wise, you arent going to find the same amp built both class A and class A/B so just find an amp you like and dont worry so much about what class it is.

EDIT: some light reading if you are interested:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_amplifier
#5
+1 to jof, the manner in which the tubes are driven in an amp aren't nearly as important as how it all sounds in the end.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#6
It's just a way of describing how the power tubes amplify the sound.
Class B and C aren't suitable for guitar amps, but but A, A/B, and D are all used. It's not something you need to worry about when buying an amp. "A" doesn't mean better in this case, it's just a descriptive term.
#7
Quote by jof1029
i dont think they make class B guitar amps, but i could be wrong. i really only see things that are class A or class A/B.

as for what it means, its how the circuit amplifies the input signal. class A is less efficient but a simpler circuit, while class A/B is more efficient but also more complex. sound wise, you arent going to find the same amp built both class A and class A/B so just find an amp you like and dont worry so much about what class it is.

EDIT: some light reading if you are interested:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_amplifier


Actually, there are amps where you can switch between A and A/B. The B52 tube amp, for example, can switch between A, A/B and solid state modes. To my ears, and most people I've talked to, the class A is warmer sounding, with a rounder punch to it. Class A/B is tighter with a bit more bite and definition.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional Pro II
Jackson Soloist SL2H
Schecter Hellraiser Solo 6
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Top
Epiphone AJ200SCE Acoustic-Electric
Epiphone Embassy
Vintage Audition Mystery Guitar
B-52 AT100
Vox VT80
#8
^The B-52 doesn't actually switch between A and A/B. It's just different rectifier settings, not sure why they called them that.
#9
Quote by Roc8995
^The B-52 doesn't actually switch between A and A/B. It's just different rectifier settings, not sure why they called them that.


Dude, I own the amp. There is a knob in the back that "switches" between modes.

Don't make me prove it to you...

Unless there's something you know, that I don't know.
Gibson Les Paul Traditional Pro II
Jackson Soloist SL2H
Schecter Hellraiser Solo 6
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plus Top
Epiphone AJ200SCE Acoustic-Electric
Epiphone Embassy
Vintage Audition Mystery Guitar
B-52 AT100
Vox VT80
Last edited by sabbathu at Oct 7, 2008,
#10
Quote by sabbathu
Dude, I own the amp. There is a knob in the back that "switches" between modes.

Don't make me prove it to you...

Unless there's something you know, that I don't know.


It might just be the label.

Half the "presence" controls out there are not true presence controls, yet are called as such.
#11
its just the rectifier settings that you change, not the full character of the amp. says so in the product manual anyway. dont really know why its named that either, doesnt seem to have anything really to do with A vs A/B amplification as far as i can tell by reading the manual.

there was some amp that had a dial to switch between class A and class A/B and everything in between or something, but it was expensive and i dont remember what it was. and it sounded more like a gimick than anything that would be really useful anyway.
#12
My Traynor switches between A and A/B. The difference between the two is output power. Class A/B is MUCH more efficient than class A. In A/B two 6L6's make 50 watts. In class A, they make 15 watts. According to the manual, the bias is also hotter in class A. (but the tubes wear less)
#14
The Class setting in the Peavey Valvekings (it goes from A to A/B I think) doesn't change the class either, I'm not 100% sure what it does but something about it sending more current to one of the tubes and less to the other (or the same in pairs if you're talking about the 100watt version).
Quote by Lunchbox362
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