#1
So if I leave my guitar in open C, will the tension mean i need to adjust the truss rod in anyway or not? since the biggest tuning difference is the low E, and the rest are only up a note, down a note, or stay the same.

Thanks for the help!
#2
It means don't ever mess with your truss rod yourself unless your a qualified technician. Judging by the fact that you have to ask this question to start with, your probably not a qualified technician.

My advice, don't touch your truss rod. As for whether or not you'll need someone else to mess with it, I'll let one of the other UG'ers answer that.
#3
yeah, i didn't mean me personally, i just meant whether or not there'd need to be any adjustment at some point due to the different string tension.
#4
You may need someone to adjust your action if your action is already very low in standard tuning. Most of the strings go down. If it's too low then it'll buzz like crazy. It may also take a few minutes before you know if it's too low to keep in that tuning. The guitar needs time to adjust itself to the tuning.

But yea... don't mess with the truss rod. It's not meant to adjust action(string height). It's only meant for a bowing problem. If you crank the truss rod too hard then you can potentially snap the rod inside the neck and screw up your guitar pretty badly.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#5
The action seems fine at the moment, theres only very minimal fret buzz on the low E which is hardly noticable, but other than that there's no problems at all.

My main concern was that i'd leave it for a few days or a week or so and suddenly have a neck which was bent.
#6
No... That's a myth. How can lack of tension warp anything? You need force to bend something, do you not? I think the common misconception is that the truss rod exerts force. It does not. You should think of a truss rod as a support for the neck like how the human spine supports the body upright(except a truss rod doesn't bend like a spine).

Umm... if your low E is buzzing now, tuning to open C will DEFINITELY give you buzz. You have to tune down from the E to a C. Tuning from E to D gives most people at least a little bit of a buzz.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#7
^ Actually, that's not entirely true cap. A truss rod does indeed exert a force on the neck of a guitar, but in the opposite direction to that of the pull of the strings. The reason that you might want to think of it as not exerting force is that it's normally static, or not in motion. It's a set it and forget it sort of adjustment, unlike the opposing force, which is the pull of the strings. And we all know how often we are adjusting those forces! Check out the example below. He had a warped and twisted cabinet door that wouldn't close properly. The age of the wood, dryness and so on caused the twist, which is in itself a force applied in one direction. He installed a simple angled truss rod on the opposite side of the door and adjusted it to provide an opposing force in the other direction. Final result, a perfectly straight door that now closes. So yes, truss rods do exert a force on the neck of a guitar.

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Luthier/Data/TrussRods/Bathroom/bath.html
#8
Hmm, ok. Well, I learn something new every day.

A truss still doesn't push hard enough to warp the neck though, does it? Because if that were true, then every unplayed guitar(with a truss rod) in the world would have a warped neck.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
Quote by Magic_Joel
So if I leave my guitar in open C, will the tension mean i need to adjust the truss rod in anyway or not? since the biggest tuning difference is the low E, and the rest are only up a note, down a note, or stay the same.

Thanks for the help!



It really depends on the guitar itself and weather or not it'll take to the alternate tuning or not. Some will without other adjustments and some may need a truss rod, saddle height or other adjustments. Your best bet is to just play it in the new tuning and monitor how the guitar performs. If after a couple of weeks you notice a bit of say fret buzz from the low E string, you certainly won't want to make a truss rod adjustment as that will effect all of the strings. You would want to correct just that string. See where I'm going with this?
#10
yeah, thanks for the info.

I actually meant that the low string was buzzing just a little when tuned to C, not buzzing when tuned to E in standard, sorry I didn't make that too clear.

Thanks for all that though, i appreciate it, i'll leave it as it is and just see if theres any change in anything.

Thanks again!
#11
Quote by captivate
Hmm, ok. Well, I learn something new every day.

A truss still doesn't push hard enough to warp the neck though, does it? Because if that were true, then every unplayed guitar(with a truss rod) in the world would have a warped neck.


Some will yes, when the opposing force is removed from the equasion that is. That being the pull from the strings. A 12 string comes to mind, or a barritone guitar. Those have much stouter truss rods and without the constant pull from the strings to keep everything in balance the neck could suffer as a result. Just because a guitar is unplayed doesn't necessarily constitute a warped neck. It's the balance of the tensions that's important. Even if a guitar is downtuned a half step or so, there's still sufficient pull from the strings to keep the balance of the truss rod to string pull in check enough to keep the neck from going whacky. Guitars left unstrung in attics then found after years of neglect will most likely have neck problems, namely backbow. Easily corrected with a little TLC, provided the neck is capable of coming back into shape. Some will some won't.