#1
Hi has anyone ever copyrighted both lyrics and songs?

I have 13 lyrics and songs i want to copyright but i dont know how.

I went to the copyright website but its confusing im having a hard time understanding it.

I downloaded a form but i dont know if i can do both the lyrics and song

advice
#2
i feel ya man...its hard to understand..here is what i got from it


mail in the amount of money needed, the lyrics to the song, the music itself, and i think even the chords and stuff for the songs (i think guitar pro tabs it out but idk)


then you wait?

im not sure though
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#3
i've been reading the site all night, from what i got is pretty much what u said

fill out the form
send the mp3's
send the lyrics
send 45$
i didnt read anything about tabs tho.

But im just having trouble finding out which form to fill out, i dunno if i have to fill 2 forms for the lyrics and the mp3's

i'll keep reading....
#4
Quote by marbar
i've been reading the site all night, from what i got is pretty much what u said

fill out the form
send the mp3's
send the lyrics
send 45$
i didnt read anything about tabs tho.

But im just having trouble finding out which form to fill out, i dunno if i have to fill 2 forms for the lyrics and the mp3's

i'll keep reading....



im pretty sure you have to fill 1 form per item...


so 13 forms for the lyrics and 13 for the songs...i think


im not 100% sure.. i havent read that info in a year haha...
Quote by jsbud11
Dude your leetness is maximum.
Seriously if you leave UG without becoming a mod, I will kill someone.
Quote by Devopast
This is turning into fap-to-amazingfretman's-love-a-thon
#5
I think you might end up spending more time and money copyrighting something than you would thinking up new material in case someone stole your original ideas.
#9
I'm pretty sure as soon as you have a documented form of it, i.e lyrics written down then its copyrighted to you. Now if you didn't write anything down and you shared lyrics with someone and they stole them theres nothing you can do about that.
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#10
so if you wanted to copyrigh somethink you send it through the mail to yourself? how will someone know it copyrighted :S
#11
Im pretty sure it won't be copyrighted by just posting it to youself.

TS, how big are you (musician wise, i dont want to know your height). Are you a local gigging musician, a national tourer, a kid playing in his bedroom, what? Are you in a position where someone might hear and actually steal your songs?

I'm just curious as to why you want to copyright it in the first place? I'm pretty sure most bands don't copyright their stuff until they get a record deal (then i'd assume the label would before releasing the songs).
#13
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
you're pretty wrong.

Why thank you for that in depth and well-mannered contradiction to my post. Care to write a post more than two lines long including:

Where you found out this brilliant legal knowledge? and
How anyone would know that it was this specific song you posted to yourself?

I wait anxiously for another beautiful reply. Seriously, im on tenderhooks. Sitting on the edge of my computer chair.
#14
can you really not figure it out?

ive been copywritting my own songs like this for a long time. Ive sold an entire cd of songs over craigslist, that were copywritted.

Send yourself a copy of your song by certified mail, dont open it, save it.

Copywritted

if anybody steals your song you have proof with US mail that you had a copy of that song before anyone else could have recorded it.

its seriously that easy,
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Oct 8, 2008,
#15
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
EVERYONE READ MY POST

to copywrite your songs, send a copy of your song to yourself in the mail


*sigh*

It is legally copywritten as soon as it is saved as some form of media, either audio or in notated form. The reason people apply for an official copywrite is because it makes it part of the public record, and makes it far easier to defend in a lawsuit in case of infringement. "Send it to yourself" is not good advice.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#16
Yes Archeo, the second biggest recording studio in austin texas gave me bad information as to how i can copywrite my own songs
#17
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
Yes Archeo, the second biggest recording studio in austin texas gave me bad information as to how i can copywrite my own songs


It would appear that they did. Unless you want to argue that some recording exec, for some reason, knows more about copywrite law than an attorney...

Looking back at my band days, I am glad that I knew enough to submit those copyright applications. Copyright registration is so easy to do and so important that it should be high on the to-do list for any band. Copyright registration is available for the group’s musical compositions and for sound recordings.

First, it is important to understand the big picture. Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (Title 17 of the U.S. Code) to the authors of “original, works of authorship” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works.

Copyright is secured automatically when the work is created, and a work is “created” when it is fixed in a copy. “Copies” are material objects from which a work can be read or visually perceived either directly or with the aid of a machine or device, such as books, manuscripts, sheet music, film, videotape, microfilm, CDs or even MP3s. If a work is prepared over a period of time, the part of the work that is fixed on a particular date constitutes the created work as of that date.

So, even though you get a copyright in your work automatically when you record it in a copy, it is still very important to register your copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office.

In general, copyright registration is a legal formality intended to make a public record of the basic facts of a particular copyright. Even though registration is not a requirement for protection, the copyright law provides several incentives to encourage copyright owners to register. Among these are:

# Registration establishes a public record of the copyright claim
# Registration is usually required before you can sue someone for infringement.
# If you register within 3 months of publishing your work or prior to an infringement of your work (I.e., a "timely" registration), statutory damages and attorney’s fees will be available to you as the copyright owner in court actions. Otherwise, only an award of actual damages and profits is available to you.

And for clarity, actual damages refers to the damages a copyright owner sustains essentially per unlawful copy made of the work. Statutory damages in Title 17 provide for damages per copyrighted work.

This means that if you don't register your copyrights, you have to give evidence of each unlawful copy made (actual damages) to receive a damage award. If you do register your copyrights and can prove infringement at trial, you don' t have to prove damages and you receive the statutory award provided for in Title 17 per work infringed. And the losing side has to pay your attorneys fees.

Here's a hypothetical. Let’s say your song was used in a television or radio commercial without your permission. Even if you can prove all the elements of copyright infringement, your case will be severely compromised if you do not have a timely registration.

If the other party knows that you cannot recover your attorneys fees if you win, they may gamble that you will not be willing to incur significant legal fees in taking the case to trial. At the very least, they may be able to leverage a “cheaper” settlement from you. In addition, the lack of statutory damages puts the pressure on you to prove your actual damages.

Fortunately, registration is easy and inexpensive. To register a work, an application form is sent to the Library of Congress, Copyright Office, together with a filing fee of $45 for each application and a deposit of the work being registered. The deposit requirements vary in particular situations, and for specific information - go to www.copyright.gov.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Oct 8, 2008,
#18
For any aussies:

In Australia, as soon as you have the music and lyrics in a written or recorded form - they are copyrighted to the the author. There is no registration process.

Registered mail does nothing, registering with APRA (Australasian Performing Right Association) does nothing.

http://www.copyright.org.au/information/music/music.htm
My name is Andy
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