#1
okay guys, i signed up in order to ask this very question:

i tried playing the guitar before but i wasn't able to do so well because my hands are really small. i mean i'm 19 already but i've got short fingers. my pinkie would be probably just over an inch and a half. i'm quite sad about this, but i still wanna go back and try.

so i'm just wondering if any of you here have small hands and can play (well) and if you do match these criteria, can you please give me a few tips on the techniques i could use. would be great if you could help.

cheers
#2
play something with a VERY thin neck like a Rickenbacker and wear it reall high like the Beattles.
#3
I have small hands.

it's not really a hindrance, even people with big hands struggle with the stretches in the beginning.

it's your inexperience, not your small hands that are causing you problems.
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#4
I have small hands too and it's not all that hard, but some barre chords feel like a cruel form of torture.

like the above poster said, thin necks are the way to go
#5
I third thin necks. I've got two guitars, one strat copy and one mustang and it's so much easier for me to play on the mustang.
#6
to add to the think neck suggestion, I would recommend a guitar that has a deep cut away. I find i have trouble getting to the higher frets of the gibson les paul because it isnt a deep cut away plus it is a thick guitar. I have an SG which has a pretty deep cut away, especially the models better than mine
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#7
I have pretty small hands, by that I mean hands that are "pretty small", not pretty hands that are small...

It doesn't really hinder you, some things may be a little trickier and you occasionally have to find alternative fingerings for things but that's about it.
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#8
I doubt it'll hinder you much later on...maybe you'll need more practice in the beginning, but I bet later on you can finger chords and licks much easier.
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#9
Just joined the forum and thought this was a perfect place for my first post...

I started guitar last month. I have what I would consider "small hands". I stand 5'5" tall and others my height generally have larger hands than I do. I bought an electric and an acoustic. First of all, the difference in neck width and girth on an electric is night and day compared to an acoustic. That doesn't mean you shouldn't play the acoustic. I have been through 5 acoustics in one month.

There are many different sizes of acoustics. My first was a full-sized and my first reaction was "it's too damn big" Then I bought a 3/4 scale guitar and it was too damn small! So, I shopped around and found a "concert" sized guitar which seems to do the trick I don't know what the scale is, but i'm assuming it's around 7/8 scale. Anyway, funny thing is, I kept my full scale acoustic as a house piece which sits on a stand in my living room. Because I was constantly exchanging the smaller acoustics I was forced the play the full-sized acoustic all month. Well, as a result I was able to stretch out my hand, build dexterity, and now even though some notes are still a reach, I play better on the full-sized.

My best advice to you would be, shop around, try different brands, different necks, different scales, and get yourself an electric if you don't have one. They even make those in 3/4 scale. Give it time! Also, try guitars with strings closer to the fretboard. And, lastly, I did have luck with an electric-acoustic that played like an acoustic but had the frame of an electric - sort of the best of both worlds. The only reason I didn't keep it was because the sound quality wasn't what I expected, but I know there's much better quality guitars out there. I was just on a budget.

Hope this helps.
#11
Doesn't hinder you, just forces you to fret notes more economically. My hands are no bigger than yours if we go by pinky and I play bass. I used to play upright bass which has a 44 inch scale and did so with no problems. There are women in the bass player forum with hands even smaller than mine and they make great music on full 34 and 35 inch scale bass guitars. This shouldn't even be an issue on guitar.

If it really bothers you, buy a mandolin, and put those tiny hands to good use
#12
you can extend the span of your fingers, if you put the neck of your guitar imbetween 2 fingers so that your fingers are pointing away from you, then run your hand down toward the body
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#13
thanks guys. great to read all the posts. right now, i'm learning on a friend's guitar, but i think i'll be going out and buying one pretty soon. i'm low on money so i don't think i'll be able to buy an electric right now so i'm going for the acoustic.