#1
but I don't really know how to get started. I've only been playing a year and 3 to 4 months: I know that's probably to early or I'm too inexperienced to write anything, let alone fingerstyle, but I'm in a theory class and towards the end of the year we're gonna have to write a song anyway. Besides I really want to try it; I love playing other artists fingerstyle songs, but isn't the whole point to eventually create original pieces? Any pointers on how to go about it?
#2
Start by playing as many finger style songs as you can
Quote by ElMaco
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#3
Take a chord progression, and pick out a couple of notes from it. Maybe get the root 3rd and 5th for the whole chord still, but don't strum all 6 strings.

For like Am F C G progression do like...

-1------------------------
------------1------1----------1
---------2-------------2------
------2------------3-----3----
-0---------------------------
-----------------------------

Etc.

Also what first guy said. I stole/borrowed a lot of what I do for finger style guitar from Mason Williams, John Williams, and Bach.
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#4
my first piece of advice would be to learn some fingerstyle stuff and make sure you have good finger independence. im assuming you've never written a song before, might want to start just composing songs to get into the process of it. if your first 5,10 or 100 songs aren't very good just keep at it. songwriting is something that you have to do alot to get better at (like anything)
#5
Quote by z4twenny
my first piece of advice would be to learn some fingerstyle stuff and make sure you have good finger independence. im assuming you've never written a song before, might want to start just composing songs to get into the process of it. if your first 5,10 or 100 songs aren't very good just keep at it. songwriting is something that you have to do alot to get better at (like anything)

I don't understand what finger independence is. I know it's probably like 'were you fingers move by themselves, duuuuuhhh' but I want to make sure. I've played here comes the sun, California dreaming, canon (trace bundy style ), Come together, drifting, dueling ninjas, another brick in the wall, a whiter shade of pale, breathe, brain damage/eclipse, and chi mai, ritual dance (don't have it perfect hedges is genius), and I'm working on Heather's song. I know that's not a lot; what artists would you suggest?
Edit: I want to learn all of the andy mckee songs that are on candyrat; it's one of my goals for the summer
#6
finger independence is basically what it sounds like. where your hands aren't stuck doing the same thing over and over, its useful for just plain ol' guitar playing but incredibly so for fingerstyle and fingerpicking songs. you want to be able to do anything without much of any thought put into it. i personally enjoy lindsay buckinghams acoustic version of "go insane"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CC0Gd9EFa7g

there some close ups of his hands here and there in the song and you can see what i mean. this really exemplifies finger independence imo.
#7
Yeah finger independence is essential for fingerstyle.

You want to be able to play different parts with your picking hand. You want your thumb mostly for bass while your fingers play the melody and possibly some rhythmic harmonies as well. Each line is usually independent of the other so your fingers need independence in order to pick each line smoothly.

I like the link above but I think blues is a good example of finger independance
Keb Mo You'll see his thumb just continuously goes to this pulsating rhythm where his fingers follow a syncopated rhythm without throwing his thumb off.

To write good fingerstyle songs though you will need to come up with nice melodies and be able to harmonize a bassline with them and then flesh the chords out a little more with some good rhythmic harmonies.

Here Comes the Sun is such a beautiful melody. I love that song.
- Try some Cat Stevens too, like Moonshadow and Where do the Children Play.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 7, 2008,