#1
what's a good chord progression that fits along the lines of sublime, but can also be changed into hard rock at a moments notice?
#2
That has vastly more to do with the orchestration than the chord progression. Chord progressions don't sound like genres.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Yeah I remember a lot of what was labeled "alternative" music used to do this. People used to tell me music was labeled Alternative because it was an "alternative" to mainstream. I used to think it was more to do with a description of the way much of the original "alternative" music would alternate between a sound that was soft to something that was hard'n'heavy.
Si
#5
If you wanted to play the same chord progression of any song sublime style try first understanding how to do raggae or ska style strumming. Usually bar chord voicings with upstrokes on the offbeat.
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

The bold is you playing upstrokes and the 1 and 2 is by the bassist and drummer. Play with that concept and try some raggae songs. Then once you have that feel you can take the same chord progression of any song and play it rock style or raggae style. Any I IV V progression can be played rock style or ragge style just expirament with tempo changes and rythems and you can figure it out.

Good idea would be to take a song you know something simple and then change it into a raggae version. Use the same progression for the same amount of measures and only change the style and rythem but keep the same structure. That would help you see what im saying.
#6
Quote by /-\liceNChains
If you wanted to play the same chord progression of any song sublime style try first understanding how to do raggae or ska style strumming. Usually bar chord voicings with upstrokes on the offbeat.
1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

The bold is you playing upstrokes and the 1 and 2 is by the bassist and drummer. Play with that concept and try some raggae songs. Then once you have that feel you can take the same chord progression of any song and play it rock style or raggae style. Any I IV V progression can be played rock style or ragge style just expirament with tempo changes and rythems and you can figure it out.

Good idea would be to take a song you know something simple and then change it into a raggae version. Use the same progression for the same amount of measures and only change the style and rythem but keep the same structure. That would help you see what im saying.


First please spell reggae right. But to expand on that, swing your 16th notes, and get rid of the lowest root and 5th in bar voicings to get a better 'chicka' sound. yes this is unrelated to chord progressions I know. a good progression is i, iv, i, VII. so in A minor it'd be Am, Dm, Am, G.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.