#1
Admit it, learning music theory is quite a chore, learning and remembering all the modes, scales etc.
So how would you go about make it interesting? Making songs based off the "key of the day"?

And I have a totally unrelated question, how do I make my notes sustain longer? This especially applies to my pinch harmonics, which fade out pretty quickly
#2
Well ... If you enjoy music, then the theory behind it should be fun and interesting to you ... Atleast that's just me.

Better guitar
Better amp
Better technique

You pick.
#3
Quote by Nielsyboy
Well ... If you enjoy music, then the theory behind it should be fun and interesting to you ... Atleast that's just me.

Better guitar
Better amp
Better technique

You pick.

This.
And for sustaining your notes for long, you need a different type of wood for your fretboard.
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#4
Theory should be interesting of it's own right. I've never had a problem with staying focused on theory (even through college). Hopefully it'll click for you. If not, go slow and don't get a head of where you need to be. It's all progressive and if you don't have the basics down you'll get lost in the next stages.
Sustain problems usually mean you need better wood in the body of your guitar to hold the note. Strung-through bodies hold notes longer because the string vibrates against the body more. Also, better bolts holding the bridge down help to transfer vibrations. But, ideally you would have a solid body made of quality wood that will sustain your note for you. My bass holds out for about 23-25 seconds, but it's also grade AAA Canadian Maple. My guitar is pretty much the same, although the smaller strings don't vibrate as long, so the sustain is shorter (about 15-18 seconds). Don't get trapped into thinking you need to press harder or use heavier strums to get longer sustain. That leads to damage to your tendons in your wrists. Try different guitars and see what works best for you. In the end you may need to upgrade, or maybe a trip to the tech to get better bolts, a cleaned up saddle, and a good set of strings to help short term.
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#6
well i feel it helps to have someone to jam with in a different key every time you jam with them....that way you get to just figure out what notes make sense over different proggressions without really having to do anything like work.....

and the other question you had.....if you have a tremelo bridge of any type its hard to get good long sustain....but other than that just more distortion and vibrato.....the pinch harmonics last longer when you get better at them....if they fade quickly its because you are not hitting the pinch in the perfect spot fot that particular harmonic...you might just be off by litterally 1/4 of a centimeter but it makes a difference
This is a G chord....i used to be in a cranberries tribute band.
#7
Quote by musicology
Theory should be interesting of it's own right. I've never had a problem with staying focused on theory (even through college). Hopefully it'll click for you. If not, go slow and don't get a head of where you need to be. It's all progressive and if you don't have the basics down you'll get lost in the next stages.


I have to say i checked you birth year because not many people (kids) around here hit it right on it when talking about theory.

Thats exactly what i was going to say. The intensive part should be learning to read bass and treble clefs (you can learn that in a week! with enough exercises). But then basic rhythms, key signatures and major and minor scales a couple of months on it! I learned it in school so it took 4-5 month with a crazy, demanding Korean chick. She kicked our asses but we learned them so good!

So you have to take it slow for it to really settle in your head. Many self taught people just want to cram information, but there has to be a pace.

Dont think about modes yet, dont think bout diminished augmented stuff yet. because if you're head is set to learn that from the beginning, might as well go to serialism and atonality!!! ha.

I dont think i answer your question directly but i believe these are some helpful tips.

Tell us who is teaching you, and how long its been and what are you planing to do with it?
#8
Quote by Zeroxk
And I have a totally unrelated question, how do I make my notes sustain longer? This especially applies to my pinch harmonics, which fade out pretty quickly


Vibrato. Vibrato is possibly the biggest and most overlooked element to good sustain so take a few days and just work on that; the benefits aren't just for sustain, you also end up sounding better in general.
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#9
Quote by Pabli7o
I have to say i checked you birth year because not many people (kids) around here hit it right on it when talking about theory.

Thats exactly what i was going to say. The intensive part should be learning to read bass and treble clefs (you can learn that in a week! with enough exercises). But then basic rhythms, key signatures and major and minor scales a couple of months on it! I learned it in school so it took 4-5 month with a crazy, demanding Korean chick. She kicked our asses but we learned them so good!

So you have to take it slow for it to really settle in your head. Many self taught people just want to cram information, but there has to be a pace.

Dont think about modes yet, dont think bout diminished augmented stuff yet. because if you're head is set to learn that from the beginning, might as well go to serialism and atonality!!! ha.

I dont think i answer your question directly but i believe these are some helpful tips.

Tell us who is teaching you, and how long its been and what are you planing to do with it?


Well, I've had a bit of a fragmented teaching experience, my piano teacher isn't that good of a teacher, he's mostly taught me chords and some basic theory like the "pattern" in a major/minor scale, but most of the time he gives me a song to practice on, taught from him for 5 years now.

So I've mostly done theory and such on my own, reading about progressions, scales, remembering key sigs (I recently bought the Dream Theater keyboard anthology, has made me remember E,G and A major by heart =\ ), didn't really start commiting to it until maybe 6 months ago.
Regarding the treble and bass clef, course I can read em , my sight reading isn't that good though and those silly notes that are a weee too far over the lines (I'm looking at you, anything past C6)

What I'm going to do with it? I guess make songs and get a better grip on improvising (hitting off-key notes while jamming is embarassing >_> )
#10
Each day plan out what you want to achieve, set some tasks, and then reward yourself when you complete them. It could be a bar of chocolate, a beer, watching porn, or whatever floats your boat.
#11
Other than what's already been mentioned, two things that can help increase sustain are compression (which includes not just a compressor, but distortion) and higher action on your strings.

But as already mentioned, vibrato is a big one. Fretting the note properly is also a factor.

Grep.
#12
Quote by Nielsyboy
Well ... If you enjoy music, then the theory behind it should be fun and interesting to you ... Atleast that's just me.


indeed this, music theory has never felt a chore for me. Perhaps you are looking at it the wrong way. I really love finding out new things and having things suddenly click and you understand something new, great feeling.
#13
^ what's not exciting about learning how to create different sounds? I think music theory is awesome. Tbh, 9/10ths of what you need to begin really having fun is just the ability to play in key and the knowledge of how each interval sounds against a root note.

After that, explore the options and possibilities of what you understand.