#1
Okay. I have this habit to a certain degree. I keep reading how this bad and what not. Why is this bad?

Let me preface this by saying I have been playing since 5 which was around 1972. I took classical from maybe 6 years old until I grew tired of it at around 16 or 17 and just wanted to play in bands.

Obviously, I did not have access to stuff like this site, tabs and people to coach my tehnique when I was learning and we had to pretty much learn everything by ear which was a long arduous process. I am a bit jealous of you guys. I find it pretty cool to learn a new song in a few minutes with tabs. I got Master and Puppets down in maybe 15 minutes yesterday. That would have taken me weeks when I was young and I did actually pick out portions of the song and solos by ear back in the 80s. I just never spent the time to put it all together until yesterday.

Back to picking.

I am an extremely fast picker and can pick or play just about anything as far as pick speed is concerned. Seems like I anchor mainly for accuracy to know which strings I am hitting especially when I go to a different guitar. Obviously, I do not anchor for chords or all the time.

Randy Rhodes anchored at times and our hand positions are very similar (left hand from classical and right hand from probably trying to emulate him when I was growing up).

I have always thought that maybe I should get away from ever anchoring or resting my pinky on the high E or hand across the bridge, but it always seemed like to much work to reinvent the wheel even when I was 18 or so 23 years ago. My pick speed was good, but I always wondered if I could even be better if my tehnique was a little different. I really just did not know which way to go.

The point of this is really asking is it that bad to anchor? If so, why? I am too old and set in my habit or ways to fix this . . . or am I.
#2
Anchoring isn't bad at all, it can just make some things harder to get used to down the line.

Seeing as you sound like an accomplished player I don't think it matters to you at all.
#3
anchoring is not a bad thing, itsactually considered good, nothing to worry about
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


People
should
smile
more



crit4crit on 'acoustic 1 (with piano)' here



Rate my playing skills please.
#4
Well, it isn't considered a good thing, but at the same time it isn't bad depending on the player. I know when I anchor I get tired more easily and my wrist starts to tense up. But some people have no problem anchoring.
#5
Almost all experienced players anchor, even if they don't realize it. I anchor when I play fast. It feels better and it's tiring if you try to keep your hand up. Yeah, it's a good thing, beause only a small handful of players can play fast without anchoring. I don't think Al di Meola anchors...
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#6
Quote by Starstorm
Well, it isn't considered a good thing, but at the same time it isn't bad depending on the player. I know when I anchor I get tired more easily and my wrist starts to tense up. But some people have no problem anchoring.


I do agree with this. Fatigue can be an issue, but when I pick a single string very fast or I am alternative between maybe just two strings next to each other for a riff, I do not anchor and it is a combination of wrist, hand and elbow for speed.
#7
Quote by 996ttcab
I do agree with this. Fatigue can be an issue, but when I pick a single string very fast or I am alternative between maybe just two strings next to each other for a riff, I do not anchor and it is a combination of wrist, hand and elbow for speed.


I find myself anchoring when I play acoustic and fingerstyle music. This is because its easier to keep your hand in the same position but I tend to lose my use of the pinky. So the bottom line is its a negative thing. I rarely practice and play my guitar sitting down so the position of my hand is detached from my guitar, always hovering. I incorporate many sweep patterns and string skipping so my right hand needs to be free. If you have been anchoring your hand for such a long time that you gotten used to it, it maybe hard to undo. If it works for you then it works. I personally think anchoring hinders my abilities.
#8
Quote by jsantos
I find myself anchoring when I play acoustic and fingerstyle music. This is because its easier to keep your hand in the same position but I tend to lose my use of the pinky. So the bottom line is its a negative thing. I rarely practice and play my guitar sitting down so the position of my hand is detached from my guitar, always hovering. I incorporate many sweep patterns and string skipping so my right hand needs to be free. If you have been anchoring your hand for such a long time that you gotten used to it, it maybe hard to undo. If it works for you then it works. I personally think anchoring hinders my abilities.


I have always wondered if my technique has limited me in anyway. I guess if you even do something wrong for long enough, you can become proficient at it.
#9
Quote by 996ttcab
I have always wondered if my technique has limited me in anyway. I guess if you even do something wrong for long enough, you can become proficient at it.


^^^ hehe trudat brotha!

But does proper technique really make you a better player?

Just keep in mind that Django Rhienhardt had only 3 functioning fingers on his fretting hand but he pwn3d the jazz scene back in his days. So he probably had unorthodox technique to compensate.

I know I have bad habits too like playing too many notes, abusing the blues penta, pinch harmonics on every end phrase and getting too drunk before a gig