#1
As a part of my new daily 3hrs guitar workout. I've dedicated a part of it to learning a new scale every day or every other day.

So out of all the tons of scales and modes out there, i was wondering what would be a good place for me to start from??

Thanks...
#2
pentatonic definitely, then move onto the modes in order

ionian
dorian
phrygian
lydian
mixolydian
aeolian
locrian....ah screw it dont learn locrian
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#3
I've dedicated a part of it to learning a new scale every day or every other day.


Why? That will accomplish nothing. Vastly more important is understanding the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony.
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#4
Start with the Ionian scale (major). Learn the theory behind it. Be able to construct it and chords out of it. Then move onto the different modes and how they work together.

Yeah learning a new scale every day or every other day is going to be pointless if you don't understand the reasoning behind what makes that scale "unique". That's why I would say start on the major scale. Learn all about intervals, chord construction, all that fun stuff, then move onto more scales.

If you know the major's down well the other scales will be easy for you to grasp.
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#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
Why? That will accomplish nothing. Vastly more important is understanding the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony.
One of the few times I've found this generic (yet true) response of value.

KNOW your major scale and how it's used. Don't worry about exotic scales. There's no way in hell you'd be able to learn 1 a day anyways.


Quote by kOoL AiD2420
Start with the Ionian scale (major). Learn the theory behind it. Be able to construct it and chords out of it. Then move onto the different modes and how they work together.

Yeah learning a new scale every day or every other day is going to be pointless if you don't understand the reasoning behind what makes that scale "unique". That's why I would say start on the major scale. Learn all about intervals, chord construction, all that fun stuff, then move onto more scales.

If you know the major's down well the other scales will be easy for you to grasp.
+1

Know the major scale inside and out including chord construction and all before going to modes though.
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#7
To help myself with scales i purchased scale card flash cards tha i found in a discount book store for 3.99 u.s. and there are 52 cards and its called " essential scales for all guitarists" and they show proper finger placement which really helps1
i find it interesting to pull three or 4 cards out randomly and play them like one big scale ! Sometimes o use a hammer on or pull offf or slide to the next scale and it keeps it interesting!
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#8
^Scale fingerings are great to know, but offer nothing with regards to theory. If you understand theory, you should be able to explain it to a singer, a trombonist, or a violinist, where guitar patterns do not apply at all.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
Why? That will accomplish nothing. Vastly more important is understanding the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony.

+1

theory for theory's sake is pretty dull - there's little point spending time and effort learning something unless you're actually going to be able to make good use it.

Also, it's not possible to learn a scale in a day - sure, you could probably memorise some finger patterns but that's not learning a scale, that's just a tiny part of it.
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#10
Ooh...

Thanks for the advice guys.
I'm a big noob when it comes to theory and lately i've been finding my lack of theory knowledge really holding me back as i love writing songs but due to my lack of knowledge i can barely come with anything good.

Do you guys know a good book or weblink or something where i can learn all about the scales inside out??

And bangoodcharlotte, i'll check out your sig.

I'm currently also learning to play the piano so the theory i learn for the guitar (or piano) helps in playing both the instruments too...
Last edited by af_the_fragile at Oct 9, 2008,
#11
Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the Colums section are great.
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#13
ya the learning new scale everyday is pointless,
as seagull said, just learn patterns and it would come by itself...

you really have to understand the application of scales and modes, not mug em up...
#14
^that's really not what was said by seagull (seagull don't like patterns )

What was said was don't just learn reams upon reams of chords, scales, patterns without learning how to use them/where they come from.

In fact if you know your intervals and major scale as well as the notes on the fretboard really well you can make scale patterns up as you go, simply by altering intervals. I think that is the way to go, learn enough theory so you can create what you want to use on the fly, and not be boged down with a lot of scales and chords that you may never even use.

Ts you seem as though you genuinely want to learn so good luck with the theory, and stick at it, just take your time and try not to move on to something new until you understand what you are looking at
#15
I don't mind patterns, I use them all the time - I just don't feel they actually teach you much of anything. They're great for navigating around the fretboard when you're using a scale, but I think they're near-useless when it comes to actually learning a scale.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 9, 2008,
#16
^ only a little joke carried on from another thread, I agree patterns are good for noodling in when improvising in a scale, but offer nothing in terms of the theory of learning a scale.
#17
Quote by rageagainst64

locrian....ah screw it dont learn locrian


hahah Dude that's my favorite!


Half diminished sounds way cool