#1
I'm trying to decide if i should sign with a indie company i don't know alot about or if i should self produce a cd. Any suggestions?
#3
i say go for it. heres the thing, get someone else with a like mind to bounce ideas off of (which ideally is what a producer is) someone that can listen to something and go "hey you know what would sound cool here" and then you can either take it or leave it. this really leaves composition pretty much entirely up to you and you can create a song how you envisioned it with the possibility of little flourishes here and there. get someone else to mix it if you dont know how. i say only go for a indie label if they won't shove a producer down your throat. i auditioned for a band who used a "professional producer" and they told me that the producer they used basically had them rewrite all their songs. in my eyes that doesn't make them the bands songs, its the producers songs. i don't want to play someone elses music, i want to write and play my music and i don't appreciate someone else trying to tell me the music i write isn't "good enough" just because it doesn't appeal to their sensibilities. thats why we have bands that sound exactly alike.
#4
self producing is not a child's play dude...
it would be a sin during the distribution process...
so i advice you to sign a record label...
#5
ok.....so went to the company's website and its not that developed....its mediocre. So i'm thinking i'm gonna look around a little bit more.
#6
Quote by BigBird428
ok.....so went to the company's website and its not that developed....its mediocre. So i'm thinking i'm gonna look around a little bit more.

^Are you looking to sign a tech head that can write a good website or a recording company with excellent clever people that are dedicated to helping you be as successful as you can be?

How old are you? Have you had much dealings with business people before? You may need to bring in someone with experience in the world of business that can spot a phony.

Business isn't about the website or the building they operate out of or how flashy their business cards look. The success of a business will come down to the person behind it. Are they honest, sincere, driven and have a "can do" attitude? Are they organized, clever, and good with people.

Usually you will find this out by talking to people that have done business with them before. Ask for references. What success has the label had before, what other bands have signed with them? Who specifically will be working for you and what are they promising? What makes them qualified to get the job done? Can you see/ hear any examples of their previous work?

If you are their first and they are just starting out you should still be able to find some sort of qualifications, or references from people they learned their craft from.

If they are a complete noob they could still be the right person to get the job done if they have the right personality for the job and nose for business. You could take each other to the top. It does however give you more scope for negotiating a good contract with sufficient performance standards on both parts and enough escape clauses so that if they turn out crap you can take your work and walk at a moments notice.

Run it past a lawyer before you sign anything.

Ask them for a plan and timeline, what their strategies will be for helping you be successful. What do they see as their role in the process and what will you be responsible for bringing to the table? What are the cost projections for the recording process - ask for a full break down before hand? Who is responsible for advertising, do they have a marketing plan for your band, what kind of distribution networks do they have? etc etc.

If you're going to do this yourself do you have a full business plan? What's your time line like? What are your cost projections? Where are your weaknesses will you have to bring people in to help you overcome those potential weaknesses? Who will they be and what will it cost for their help? How will you market how will you plan? Basically if you are serious about DIY you will have to ask all the same questions of yourself that you are asking of the potential label.

If you have a rough business plan I'd be happy to have a look and give a few pointers. - I've seen many of these from back of a napkin business plans to forty minute power point presentations and everything in between.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 9, 2008,
#8
Yeah, on principle it comes down to two mercurial elements: music, and money. The record label will probably make both more abundant but essentially a self produced record is always going to have a more personal feel, and for me that's what makes the most honest music. Record companys are lie lie sell sell so if you go with them, your record might have fewer glitches along the production/distribution chain, but its almost certainly not going to be 100% yours, musically, and in the rights, which is the only reason they're involved in the first place.


So unless I was expecting more than a couple of thousand people to buy the CD, I'd stump the cash myself and probably draught in a friend for the production, because too many cooks definitely spoil the broth, especially if one of them would piss in the soup if they could sell more of it.
Once We Were Anarchists
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^That dude's in his 30s, just so you know. He's not some 23-year-old prick at Wharton pursuing his MBA who thinks he knows everything about business.


, powerpoint?! How very Office 98.
Once We Were Anarchists
#11
powerpoint?! How very Office 98.
I don't know what you're trying to say, so I'll give three responses:

If you're complimenting me, thank you very much!
If you're calling me out or insulting me, fuck off!
If you're trying to make a joke, I don't get it.

I hope it's the first one; I like jokes, and, despite what some of my posts may indicate, I don't like telling people to fuck off.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I don't know what you're trying to say, so I'll give three responses:

If you're complimenting me, thank you very much!
If you're calling me out or insulting me, fuck off!
If you're trying to make a joke, I don't get it.

I hope it's the first one; I like jokes, and, despite what some of my posts may indicate, I don't like telling people to fuck off.



omg sigged..


id say find out as much as you can about the label and who owns/runs it... as well as who would be your producer... and make sure you read 100% of what ever they make you sign
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#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^That dude's in his 30s, just so you know. He's not some 23-year-old prick at Wharton pursuing his MBA who thinks he knows everything about business.
hey!! I'm only three months into my 30's. You make me sound so old .

I have worked with hundreds interviewed thousands of small to medium sized business owners, managers, accountants, lawyers, bankers, franchisees, franchisors, business planners, and consultants. I've also had a fair amount of training as a business consultant and business banker so I hope I have some idea when it comes to evaluating and facilitating the success of a small to medium sized business. At least my old boss thought I did and paid me well to do it so I guess those are my credentials if I anyone really needs any for an internet music forum post.

As for the "powerpoint - so office 98" comment I don't get the joke either. People were still using powerpoint a year ago when I left it all behind. Perhaps there has been some breakthrough in the field of presentation since I left, I'm not sure.

Personally I can't stand powerpoint anyway I'd fall asleep until question time. I preferred to receive business plans on paper so that I could pick it to pieces and write notes all over it, then I'd meet the person/people behind the business to get a feel for their character and drive. The personal factor was the most important aspect for me because that is the hardest stuff to learn, if it can be learned at all, and the most important indicator of a businesses likelihood for success.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Oct 9, 2008,
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
Perhaps there has been some breakthrough in the field of presentation since I left, I'm not sure.
All of my large lectures in college have used and still use Powerpoint presentations, thank god, so there has not been any breakthrough.


When I gave your age, I was trying to make you sound wise, as opposed to the wise-ass at Wharton.