#1
I've decided i'm gonna practice my guitar for 3hrs everyday from today onwards so hopefully by the end of the year, i should be kicking ass!!

I thought i'ld divide my workout into 3 parts.
1st part: Technique and exercises to help my co-ordination, strength, speed and all.
2nd part: Theory learning to get me a better understanding of how music works. Learning scales n stuff.
3rd part: Putting it all together and maybe jam around for an hour or learn to play a song.


So i was wondering how effective would this strategy would be and if any of ye could help me out coming up with more effective strategies and like find more specific things to do in each part of my work out. Like specific technique exercises or specific stuff i should lean and practice for the theory.

And even for the 3rd part if anyone could recommend me some good technically challenging stuff to learn. As i mostly play punk-ish stuff, which i usually find no difficulty in learning to play but neither do it feel i've improved my guitar playing abilities after i've learned to play those songs...
#3
this is what i do, but i dont do theory, and i go from 3-4 hours. it works well, also you should play infront of a mirorr, helps a lot.

i dont think learning theory should be apart of your 3hs, kinda pointless. just read up on it when your about to go to bed or seomthing
#4
Wow, you make guitar playing sound so boring and tedious, just play what you want when you want and you'll have much more fun and therefore want to continue to play thus making you better.
#5
yer if you start seeing it as something you have to do rather than something you want to do youll probably give up
#6
Quote by Guitarism12
yer if you start seeing it as something you have to do rather than something you want to do youll probably give up



I totally agree. I sorta had a similar routine a few years back and whilst it might work for a week or so it will become a chore. Now I just pick up and play no planned attack.
#7
Even after playing for years I like to set a practice schedule. It really helps me focus on what i'm trying to achieve. I can't just sit down and do whatever comes to mind. I find that unorganized and a waste of my time. I love playing so much that whether it's going over scales 100x or practicing a new song it's always fun.

In my opinion, practice takes alot of focus and should be done at a slow pace focusing on creating muscle memory over trying to play fast.
#8
Quote by lewis_grey
Wow, you make guitar playing sound so boring and tedious, just play what you want when you want and you'll have much more fun and therefore want to continue to play thus making you better.

This is what i've been doing since the past two years and i feel its the reason why i'm still so shite.

I like to write songs n stuff so i wanna learn theory. I think its really important to know your theory either way.
And i haven't really seriously worked on my technique all along and so i'm still very sloppy and unclean while playing stuff.
I felt i really needed to improve on these things and i've also got a tight schedule being in college and all, i need to fix a time for my guitar everyday or elz i'll hardly get at it.

So like i'll see, if after a couple of weeks i start to feel tired and start looking at it as a chore, i'll change my approach towards it.
#9
It's good to have a schedule but you might find that working on it for 3 hours a day becomes impractical quite quickly, you can make huge amounts of progress with just 20 minutes of practice in each area as long as you practice the right things.

Technique - 20 minutes of focussed practice on finger independence and economy of motion (see Freepower's videos on youtube)

Music theory - 10 minutes of learning the notes of the fretboard, 10 minutes of learning scales and arpeggios as notes and sets of intervals rather than patterns

Music - 10 minutes of song practice, 10 minutes of backing track/song based improvisation and possibly some time to come up with licks and write songs of your own

That's what I would do if I were you but obviously that's just my opinion.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
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#11
Thanks Zaphoid.

That does look like a good routine. That looks much more realistic and doable.
I might end up spending more time jamming and goofing around on my guitar but i think 20mins on technique and theory are much more realistic than spending an hour on them.
Maybe as i get into it i can start spending more and more time on it but for now that seems like a good place to start from!

Thanks mate!


Oh and Freepower, never realised you're from Dublin too!
Maybe we could meet up sometime and you could teach me some cool stuff!!
#12
Quote by Freepower
^ that's actually a good routine there. If you want faster progress, you can do more of that kind of stuff, but that's actually a good division of effort.


I really should practice what I preach sometimes...I rarely dedicate that much time to real practice.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
^I'd like to add ear training. Spend some time every day (it can be seperate from your actual practicing) just listening closely to songs, beats, notes, backing tracks, your own tone (record and listen to yourself often), whatever. Ear training is a oft neglected but very important part of growing as a musician.

On a side note, I may try that routine myself Zaphod
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#14
Quote by Garou1911
^I'd like to add ear training. Spend some time every day (it can be seperate from your actual practicing) just listening closely to songs, beats, notes, backing tracks, your own tone (record and listen to yourself often), whatever. Ear training is a oft neglected but very important part of growing as a musician.

On a side note, I may try that routine myself Zaphod


Dammit, I knew there was something I forgot...still, fitting all of into an hour is a bit of a challenge seeing as how I think 10 minutes is probably about the minimum you can really practice if you want to really make progress. Practice shedules should be flexible anyway, playing through the exact same routine every day seems like it would get boring to me.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#15
Quote by Garou1911
^I'd like to add ear training. Spend some time every day (it can be seperate from your actual practicing) just listening closely to songs, beats, notes, backing tracks, your own tone (record and listen to yourself often), whatever. Ear training is a oft neglected but very important part of growing as a musician.

On a side note, I may try that routine myself Zaphod

what do you say i should do for ear training??
like i've got a good ear from a producer's point of view. i can pick out certain subtle production elements like reverb, EQ and all...
Though i'm not very good at picking out musical notes and intervals...
I can kinda pick out 5ths and octaves but i'm not very good at it...
#17
Quote by af_the_fragile
what do you say i should do for ear training??
like i've got a good ear from a producer's point of view. i can pick out certain subtle production elements like reverb, EQ and all...
Though i'm not very good at picking out musical notes and intervals...
I can kinda pick out 5ths and octaves but i'm not very good at it...

More then anything, get a sense of your own tone by listening to yourself. Record yourself often, be it on a computer, on a digital recorder, or even a $3 tape deck from your local thrift store. You can always tell yourself you're doing well on a particular thing, but tape will never lie.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play