#1
Hi, I'm currently going through the process of learning the fretboard. I'm looking for a few books that would help me learn it, for plain memorization seems it will take me years.


Once I learn the fretboard, I will be looking for a book on how to apply music theory to guitar. Any recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#2
http://www.amazon.com/Fretboard-Logic-SE-Reasoning-Arpeggios/dp/0962477060

That book is pretty good, I have it and went through it fairly quickly, but it is based around the concept of connecting patterns (first with chords, then with scales) all over the fretboard. This concept is called the CAGED system, and you can find quite a bit about it online if you don't want to spend the 20$ or whatever it is on the book.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#3
If you're going to get into theory, I would highly recommend getting your reading chops together. Reading music on the guitar is a great way to get to know the fret-board and become familiar with the language that music theory is taught in.
shred is gaudy music
#4


The Advancing Guitarist

Veteran musician and educator Mick Goodrick presents practical information for guitarists who want to improve their playing technique and style and simply become better musicians. Rather than a step-by-step method book, the information is presented in a general essay format, discussing ways that the various techniques covered may be applied by the advancing guitarist to enhance his/her own style of playing, some of the areas discussed include: basic fingerboard mechanics * modes, scales and chords * contemporary harmony * harmonica and overtone influences * being self-critical * improvising short pieces * different playing situations.

That can be supplemented by this book:



The most complete book on scales and modes ever written. An encyclopedia with over 6,000 diagrams, charts and graphs. Complete explanation of all 5,6,7, and 8 tone scales and modes. The essential volume for every guitarist's library.

This book is a "where to" book, showing you exactly where to find any scale in any key on your fretboard. It is a professional reference tool to enhance your music library and playing that you will use for many years to come.
#5
I agree with GuitarMunky, sight reading is well worth the effort. IMO, it starts to pay off pretty quickly.

Also, "The Advancing Guitarist" is one *excellent* book! That one can keep you busy for a very long time. There's a reason it's so highly regarded.

Not huge on the Grimoire book, but it's good. I just prefer to make my own diagrams, in the end.

Grep.
#6
Quote by Grep


Not huge on the Grimoire book, but it's good. I just prefer to make my own diagrams, in the end.

Grep.


Tru on that grep. I think the intro pages of the griomoire book is very helpful as it shows you how to formulate your own scale and mode charts.

other than that, its more of a visual supplement.
#7
The most complete book on scales and modes ever written. An encyclopedia with over 6,000 diagrams, charts and graphs. Complete explanation of all 5,6,7, and 8 tone scales and modes. The essential volume for every guitarist's library.


I would strongly advise against the Grimoire. 90% of the book is redundant information, and it doesn't explain the theory behind any of the scales or their applications.

Something like Piston's Harmony will be far more useful to someone looking to learn theory than some scale encyclopedia.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
I don't know anything about it but it might help (and hell, it's free):
http://guitarebooksforall.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2008-03-02T19%3A27%3A00-08%3A00&max-results=10
http://rapidshare.com/files/95612692/Fretboard_Roadmaps.pdf


Quote by Archeo Avis
I would strongly advise against the Grimoire. 90% of the book is redundant information, and it doesn't explain the theory behind any of the scales or their applications.

Something like Piston's Harmony will be far more useful to someone looking to learn theory than some scale encyclopedia.
This is so fucking true.


Here ya go TS:

http://guitarebooksforall.blogspot.com/search/label/Fret%20board

Quote by Thursdae
http://www.amazon.com/Fretboard-Logic-SE-Reasoning-Arpeggios/dp/0962477060

That book is pretty good, I have it and went through it fairly quickly, but it is based around the concept of connecting patterns (first with chords, then with scales) all over the fretboard. This concept is called the CAGED system, and you can find quite a bit about it online if you don't want to spend the 20$ or whatever it is on the book.
I will save you money: http://rapidshare.com/files/128781196/FretBoard.pdf
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Oct 9, 2008,
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
I would strongly advise against the Grimoire. 90% of the book is redundant information, and it doesn't explain the theory behind any of the scales or their applications.

Something like Piston's Harmony will be far more useful to someone looking to learn theory than some scale encyclopedia.


Like I said, i labeled it as a "supplement" after the Advancing Guitarist book. So take it easy Rambo
#10
Quote by jsantos
Like I said, i labeled it as a "supplement" after the Advancing Guitarist book. So take it easy Rambo


In which case it's still useless. The vast majority of the book is still redundant information, most of the scales contained therein are harmonically useless, and would be melodically better described as alterations to the major scale. A thorough understanding of the major scale will allow you to construct any of those scales, in any key, all over the fretboard, without a reference.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
ok.... lol..... moving on.

The the original poster. If you want to memorize the whole fretboard without taking years of graphing it out, the Grimoire already has every scale under the sun in very position. That can also take a while so it's a catch 22.
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
If you're going to get into theory, I would highly recommend getting your reading chops together. Reading music on the guitar is a great way to get to know the fret-board and become familiar with the language that music theory is taught in.


I actually do know how to read up to like the fifth fret it all goes down hill from there
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#13
Quote by fenderuser93
I actually do know how to read up to like the fifth fret it all goes down hill from there


its a good start though.
Try working on the higher positions. That really helped me solidify my knowledge of the notes on the neck.
shred is gaudy music
#14
My problem is I don't have a solid definition for all of the positions.

all the websites i see all say something different
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#15
I've been reading through fretboard logic, I find it kind of limiting, plus he seems to be making his own terms throughout.

It seems I'm back to the drawing board any other recommendations are welcome
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#16
Are you looking to learn the notes of the fretboard? Cause if so.. fretboard logic isn't the book to do that. Memorization is probably the only real way to learn them so you can look at a certain string, certain fret, and know the note.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#17
I want to learn the notes, but I also want to be able to apply theory to the neck, I'll take it one step at a time and learn the notes then apply it later
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on