#1
what normally makes a song's name appealing? I can think of songs that have good names, but not exactly why they are good. normally the song's name makes you want to listen, but what in the name actually does that?
#2
the solo,,the name has nothingreally, u hear it, then u go get it
Just call me Julius, J, etc.
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#3
Quote by nowa90
the solo,,the name has nothingreally, u hear it, then u go get it



yeah thats helpful





:edit: oh yea thats supposed to be sarcastic
Last edited by rock_n_roll124 at Oct 9, 2008,
#4
I agree. The name of a song doesn't have much to do with whether anyone likes it or not. The name of the song is mostly a matter of taste, genre, and intent. If you're writing a pop song with the idea of getting in on radio/tv/movies, you want to name the song after the chours or part of the chorus. That way, when people hear it and want to buy it, they don't have a hard time finding it (Think: "Party Like a Rockstar," "Umbrella," "What a Girl Wants," "Oops, I Did it Again." If you're trying to be artisitic, you can come up with an abstract name that doesn't have anything to do with the song, or a metaphor for what the song is about. Metaphors are good.

When I'm trying to think of a name for a song, I'll usually start by going through the lyrics in my head to see if any jump out at me. I'll usually avoid using any of the lyrics in the chorus because it's too obvious and boring. I might take a part of the verse that is vague, that you wouldn't think would be the name of a song and use that. Also, using different spellings of a word can make things interesting, for example "One Weak" by deftones or "Eye Would Die 4 U (the eye part) by Prince.

What sucks nowadays is with digital recording, you need to name the song before you record it. I usually just use something random for that and change it later.

I should write an article about this for U.G.
#5
I think original names; and big ones also catch the attention. Just look at Minus The Bear's song names... they have a song called "Lemurs Man! Lemurs!" so yeah.. that leaves a person intrigued at what the hell is expected from a song with that title.

EDIT: By the way, he's not saying that the name makes a song good or not... he's asking about appealing names, it has nothing to do with how catchy the song is or what part of the music makes it all worth.
Last edited by seventh_angel at Oct 9, 2008,
#6
Quote by seventh_angel
I think original names; and big ones also catch the attention. Just look at Minus The Bear's song names... they have a song called "Lemurs Man! Lemurs!" so yeah.. that leaves a person intrigued at what the hell is expected from a song with that title.



yes.

this is what I mean. names that are interesting, and draw your attention. lots of writers start with a song's name, and build off of that. that is how I find it easiest.
#7
Do you want easy or do you want art? Haha. Just kidding. Seems to me like you're doing it backwards, though. A song, when you get down to it, is a statement. You start off with something to say and you find a way to express it that is either really direct or poetic or artistic or whatever. The name is the last thing you should be concerned about.

To me, the ideal song name is one that is intriguing, but doesn't give too much away. That way, after hearing the song a few times, the name has a whole new meaning.

Good luck.
#8
well there's "tomorrow never knows" by the beatles

I don't know if john lennon thought of the name or words first, but i think the title is alot more attractive than the song itself. you might not like the song, but the name sounds like something that would have really meaningful, poetic lyrics. and so it sounds like something that you (depending on your tastes) might want to listen to.
#9
NorCalLos is right; the last thing I do when writing something is the title. You have this idea in mind and you want to make a song about it, you don't title it and then write about it; for example, it's the same you want to write about your dog, name the song "My Dog" and start every verse with my dog this my dog that. As he said, you're thinking backwards.
#10
if you think the same way as everybody else, then its all gonna sound the same. i mean in terms of form...


anyway, it doesn't have to be that you write the title first. you can write a good song and finish it off with a bad title, and many people won't pay attention (unless they already know it, of course, or are open minded).
#11
i think the simple fact is that you can do it either way. u can write a title first, or the lyrics first. i usually do it the latter way, but whatever.
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#12
Quote by rock_n_roll124
yes.

this is what I mean. names that are interesting, and draw your attention. lots of writers start with a song's name, and build off of that. that is how I find it easiest.

just name it something that has personal meaning. and dont make it a four line name, cuz fall out boy does that, and you dont wanne be fall out boy.
#13
Quote by chumpzilla
and dont make it a four line name, cuz fall out boy does that, and you dont wanne be fall out boy.



+1
#14
I actually admire some of Fall Out Boy's and Panic At The Disco's song titles. I can't stand the music unfortunately, but something has to be said about "Champagne For My Real Friends, Real Pain For My Sham Friends."

Take a look at some really out there song titles, like Details On How To Get ICEMAN On Your License Plate - Don Caballero, Drunkship Of Lanterns/Day Of The Baphomets/Cygnus...Vismund Cignus/any song written by - The Mars Volta, "You Got a Death Wish, Johnny Truant?" - Fall Of Troy... the list goes on and on.

If you like the wacky stuff, skim science textbooks and religious texts looking for words or phrases you think sound good. Then, based on the theme of the song, you can associate similar words to songs, and start your titles around there.

Or, you could write a pop song with the title being the hook. I've never been one to go that route, but to each their own.
#15
i think that name of the song must show us the sense of it and the reasons for writing. when u read the title you should understand what tis gonna be about. the song with dry & uninteresting name will be no too popular among people who read first and not listen after the name was not very catching.
when I'm looking for a good name for a song i make up several variants and than give to me friends to choose)) 'cause tis better seen from aside))
#16
I name the songs I write by taking the song in my head and thinking of what it reminds me of. To me, the key is symbolism. I use a lot of color words in titles because they describe my pieces. Think of what your theme for the song is then think of a phrase that matches that theme. Be simple, and dont think too much, or the name will have no meaning.
#17
i generally don't like to name the song after the hook, if possible... i like to name it after something symbolic of the lyrics. but thats not always the case.
#18
have titles with double meanings,

for example 'teenage w'hore moans' ... get it?
#19
Song titles mean the world to me, is it because I know the song though, maybe

Angels - robbie williams - sucks
Angel - the faces - rules

But some titles are just brilliant.
#20
I always name the song after what inspired the song in the first place. I recently wrote a song about Indiana Jones that was originally inspired by the Diet Dr Pepper cans they had this past summer. So I named the song Diet Dr Jones.
#21
here is a couple questions to ask yourself when nameing a song(in order of importance)

1. Does it have to do with the lyrical content of the song??
EX. song is about murder so you name it "chokeing (sp?) on blood"(don't steal it...)

2. Is it easy to remember? uniqueness is key....
It can also be easy to remeber if you name the song after the chorus
EX. uniqueness"Far Beyond the Sun" chorus"Wanted Dead or Alive"

3. Please, for the love of God, don't name a love song after a woman...
every one of those always ends up badly (exception: Amanda-Boston)
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see...
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#22
well you can have names that are in the lyrics, like in the chorus. Thats in pinball wizard, wonderwall, etc. New bands have names that have nothing to do with the song like panic at the disco- "lying is the most fun a girl can have without taking her clothes off" good song too. i like when i write song titles and put in an emotion or a way i feel that is expressed in the song or a mood or action that you feel is going on in the song. for example, a car chase title could go for achilles last stand by zep. thats just my output
#23
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