#1
My teacher has given us a big graph and told us to make a picture on it but it has to include several types of lines (parallel, perpendicular, etc) and two absolute value graphs. So i've drawn a house and fulfilled all the requirements but the second part is to write the equations and domain restrictions of the lines. Would an equation really only be necessary for a slanted line or absolute value graphs? Do the domain restrictions just basically say to what points a certain line extends as to not imply that the lines go on forever? How do you write the domain of a line?
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#4
Do the domain restrictions just basically say to what points a certain line extends as to not imply that the lines go on forever?
yep

How do you write the domain of a line?
in school here we did it like: x ∈ [-2,2]


and everything is some kind of equation so I don't get what you're getting at
#5
we did that in 6th grade
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#6
masamune im pretty sure thats not what i'm looking for
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#7
say you got a line going from (2,3) to (6,7)

the eq should be something like

y=x+1
and domain restriction is X is greater than or equal to 2 and less than or eqaul to 6.
use symbols ofcourse.
#8
The domain is the set of x values for which the curve/line works. So for a straight line extending forever, that's "All real x" because it is true for all values of x. If the line only lies between x=2 and x=5, then the domain would be 2 <= x <= 5

The range, if this is important, is the same, but for function/y values. The range of an absolute value graph sitting on y=0 would be y >= 0.


edit: in case you didnt know, they arent arrows. They are "Less than or equal to" and so forth.
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Last edited by syk3d at Oct 9, 2008,
#9
If you're doing it on a graphing calculator:

1. Vertical lines aren't possible on a graphing calculator's y= feature due to the fact that it interprets them as functions of x, and a vertical line fails the vertical line test for a function.

2. Domain restrictions look like this:

y = blah blah blah | 3<x<6

on a calculator.
#10
Quote by LinkManDX
If you're doing it on a graphing calculator:

1. Vertical lines aren't possible on a graphing calculator's y= feature due to the fact that it interprets them as functions of x, and a vertical line fails the vertical line test for a function.

2. Domain restrictions look like this:

y = blah blah blah | 3<x<6

on a calculator.


get a calculator that does parametric plots?
#11
ah ok, i found some old notes and i'm all good with how to get the domain and stuff now, thanks =)
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#12
one more thing actually, when graphing a line... say i have I have a vertical line on (3,0) and it goes up and down 4 units so the domain would be -4<y<4 right? but do i have to put x=3 as well? so the complete domain would be like x=3 -4<y<4 or something?
<Raven> I got so baked last night
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<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#13
Quote by C.C. Deville
one more thing actually, when graphing a line... say i have I have a vertical line on (3,0) and it goes up and down 4 units so the domain would be -4<y<4 right? but do i have to put x=3 as well? so the complete domain would be like x=3 -4<y<4 or something?


If the line spans 4 units, then no. You'd put:


__ < y < __

First blank is the lowest value for y that the line starts at, and the second blank is the highest.

So if I had a vertical line from -2 to 11, I would write:

-2 < y < 11

To show that y will always be greater than -2 (or -2 is not greater than y) and that y will always be less than 11
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