#1
i want to get away with just one overhead mic for my drumset, and im planning to go straight into my computer, am i going to need to get a usb mic or is there an adapter of some sort to go into the comp. from a regular mic jack thing, any specific mic suggestions?
also, for the positioning of the mic, i just need a boom stand and position the mic over my head right? thats what i got from the R&Rs,
im going to be askin alot of these kindsa questions for a little while, im finally gettin my studio type room goin, and i got no one else to ask this stuff but you awesome UG peeps
#2
There is no XLR to USB adapter. It is either one or the other. Anything designed with pro applications will have an XLR plug on it. USB mics are designed primarily for things like podcasting, etc. Will it work for drums? Sure. It just won't be as good as a lot of other choices.

One mic on a drumkit is really not going to be very gratifying. What is your purpose for recording? If it is just to play back and listen to assess a performance like a rehearsal or something, that's fine. If it is to make a recording that others will listen to.... you might want to rethink.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#4
there's no such thing as a quality USB mic...just get a good interface and use whatever mics you like...no limits!
#5
Quote by llanafreak44
One mic would work great, ASSUMING you have a great room, a great set, and a GREAT GREAT drummer.


Not necessarily true. If you want a jazz-kit sound, or a roomy 1950's drum sound, then yes. If you want a modern rock sound.... no way.... never with one mic, no matter how good everything else is.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
ok the...since a single mic seems to be out of the picture, would i need to buy individual microphones for each drum, the kits that they sell usually only have 5 mics (3 toms, snare, bass), how do you mic the cymbals in this situation, also, since i have 4 toms would i need 4 mics, or could i put one mic between two toms or something like that,
#7
As a general rule, the 'in your face' drum sound is only achieved by placing the mics 'in the face' of the kit. As much as possible, you mic each head individually. Given that this is not always possible, then compromises are made. It is better to put one mic between two toms than it is to put one between the snare and the floor tom for instance.

For cymbals, they're captured in the overhead mics. Typically you will use two small (or maybe medium) diaphragm condensors over the kit to catch the 'whole kit' sound. When that 'whole kit' sound is added to the 'in your face' sound, it adds a 'live' feel to the performance as opposed to a really mechanical and processed sound. This is where the cymbals live in your mix.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
1 mic on the bass drum, 1 on the snare, 1 around the toms and 2 overhead?