#1
I was reading up on counterpoint today and I realized I don't even know how to name intervals when descending.

Moving from middle C up to G is ascending a fifth, but what would you call moving from middle C down to G? Descending a fifth, or is it in fact descending a FOURTH?

In other words:
When you descend a third, are you just descending two steps? Or are you actually playing the third of your starting note displaced down an octave?

Hopefully you can understand me because I'm convinced that I'm totally retarded.
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#2
If you have a P5 ascending, subtract that from 9 and you get a 4th descending. You can use this for anything else so for example a M6th up from C is A so 9 - 6 = 3 but when you ascend a major you descend a minor so A is a m3 below C. Hope that helps.
12 fret fury
#3
Your example would be descending a fourth.

When you descend a third, you would be playing the 6th of your root note an octave lower

No worries, everyone has been in your position.

Everyone was a noob at one time or another. It gets better, i promise
#4
So when you descend to a note, it's the inversion of ascending to the same note?
Quote by TGautier13
Because e-cred on a sub-par 4Chan knockoff forum is what everyone strives to achieve.
We believe - so we're misled
We assume - so we're played
We confide - so we're deceived
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#5
Quote by ramm_ty
So when you descend to a note, it's the inversion of ascending to the same note?
A up to E is ascending a 5th. A down to E is descending a 4th. Does that answer your question?
#6
Yes, thanks everyone.
Quote by TGautier13
Because e-cred on a sub-par 4Chan knockoff forum is what everyone strives to achieve.
We believe - so we're misled
We assume - so we're played
We confide - so we're deceived
We trust - so we're betrayed