#1
Hi Guys,

Registered on this site minutes ago. I've been trying to work on modes the past couple of days & I started off with dorian. Started off in the key of C#. As far as music theory goes I know the major & minor scale & some chords. Consider me an amateur.

My problem is that I don't know what dorian should sound like. I can run up & down the scale but thats moot if I can't get to the feel. Now after playing in the mode(whatever the theory says) for the past couple of days I kinda got the feel that dorian sounds like a minor scale.

Per my understanding, for dorian I should start from the second note of a major scale & end on the second note to be in the mode. So, I made a small clip with me playing a few notes that I think may sound like dorian. Would like for you guys to validate if it indeed sounds like dorian or provide me with other constructive feedback.

Here's the link to the clip I posted on youtube - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BovLehDpH8E

Thanks
Voodoo Star
#2
to comment on your youtube description, Dorian and natural minor are pretty much the same other than that raised 6th, which to a lot of opinions, make the color of the minor a bit brighter and less sad/tense. Treat the modes mentally as their own scales and not weird reiterations of the major scale, it'll help. ooh and go listen to some Santana if you want some really awesome Dorian licks.
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#3
Per my understanding, for dorian I should start from the second note of a major scale & end on the second note to be in the mode


The note you end on is irrelevant. What matters is the tonal center.
If you want to play D# dorian, play it over a static D# minor chord. You can play the notes of the mode in any order, anywhere on the fretboard.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Yep, that's D# dorian.

Edit: Hang on - I don't think you played a B#. B# is what distinguishes D# dorian from D# minor

To get the sound of other modes, try droning the E string and playing a melody in E lydian, E mixolydian, E prhygian etc on the other 5 strings.
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Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Oct 10, 2008,
#5
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Yep, that's D# dorian.


To get the sound of other modes, try droning the E string and playing a melody in E lydian, E mixolydian, E prhygian etc on the other 5 strings.



yeah, here's a good video that demonstrates that idea!

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA
#6
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the first chord in a scale what determines whether it's major or minor? With that thinking, Dorian would be a minor scale, as would Phrygian and Aeolian. Lydian and Mixolydian would both be major.
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#7
Quote by Page&HammettFan
Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the first chord in a scale what determines whether it's major or minor? With that thinking, Dorian would be a minor scale, as would Phrygian and Aeolian. Lydian and Mixolydian would both be major.


The third degree of the scale will determine whether it is major or minor. You are correct about which are major and which are minor.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Lick #2 here. This guy is a top lecturer at on of Europe's leading music college's.

You might wanna hang on for lick #5 too!
#9
Go on youtube and check out Vinnie Moores mode lessons. They are a great introduction as he plays each mode over a drone to let you hear how it sounds and then he talks about ways to remember how they sound.
Andy
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
The third degree of the scale will determine whether it is major or minor. You are correct about which are major and which are minor.


what if you end up in something like locrian or a mode of melodic minor?

edit: or dare i say, augmented or diminished scales?

edit2: or a synthetic mode.
My Gear:

82 Gibson Explorer
Ibanez '03 JEM7VWH

Greg Byers '01 Classical (Euro Spruce bent top)
Darren Hippner 8 String Classical (Engelmann Spruce)
Alhambra 4P
Taylor 614ce
Framus Texan se. # 5/196

Diezel Herbert 2007
Mesa Recto 2x12
Last edited by thepagesaretorn at Oct 11, 2008,