#1
I'm considering going back to college for Music Courses and i met the head of Musical Department who offered to teach me Music theory for an amount of money per month.

The Professor himself told me i need to do Piano Theory as well which i somehwat doubt.
He later introduced me to his son who teaches music Theory for Guitar. He asked me various questions such as :
- Do you play the Electric Guitar?
- Yes

-Do you use your Fingers to play or do you use a Pick
- ummm i use a pick
When he asked me he was holding a Classic Guitar playing stuff with his fingers when i realised that this man propably had almost nothing to do with electric Guitars.

I mean sure some people RARELY use their fingers on an Electric Guitar to play a style called Fingerpick Rockabilly or so i've heard.
But Why the hell would he ask me a question like : Do you use a pick or your fingers....

I decided not to do any classes there as i would propably end up doing Piano Theory from 0 and Guitar Theory from 0.

I saw a Student there that has been doing guitar lessons for 3 years ( Classic ) and is now doing Arpegios.
I mean 3 YEARS to do arpegios? No thank you.

What do you think?
#2
the fingers/pick question is reasonable. you've never heard of mark knopfler or jeff beck? both use their fingers. depending on what you play, playing with fingers can be a great idea

it can also be much easier to learn theory on piano which you can then translate to guitar

don't dismiss it right away
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Last edited by single-coil at Oct 10, 2008,
#4
Maybe they're a slow learner?
I personally play electric and acoustic.

Im trying to learn how to pick with my fingers, cause thats for the whole purpose of the acoustic playing for me. My guitar teacher uses his fingers to pick, even on electrics, and he just so natural with you, you wouldnt believe it. But then again it also depends on what you want to learn.

Even if you dont want to learn it, it always comes in handy.
I suppose your wanting to do electric, so maybe finger picking isnt for you. But its totally upto you and what you want to learn.
Dont think ive said anything useful here.. but oh well..
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#5
3 years to do arpeggios? omfg you won't be able to shred in 2 years!

I'd rather study the basics for 3 years and get a rock solid foundation than try and learn every technique and make a hash job of it ;P
#6
'Piano theory'?

That's just... music theory?

What's the difference between 'piano theory' and 'guitar theory'?
#7
I guess he means that they teach you it with you sat at a piano, as opposed to playing a guitar. This could make a big difference - I've learned tons of theory on the guitar but having only played the piano a year or so I wouldn't call myself a great pianist. It can take a little bit to translate the stuff I've learned on the guitar to the piano - I imagine it'd be the same the other way round (hell, probably harder due to the layout of the guitar).
#9
but seriously as if you'd limit yourself to one style of guitar. so one dimentional....
#10
Piano theory is really useful for writing any sort of music, I wish I'd started it sooner.
#11
If he was rolling arpeggios with all 4 fingers then that's a hellishly difficult technique.
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#12
I don't know, I think learning theory on piano can only be helpful. It makes alot more sense.
#13
Quote by steven seagull
If he was rolling arpeggios with all 4 fingers then that's a hellishly difficult technique.


wat the hell is an arpeggio? i've been playing for 2 and half years and never heard of them
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all
#14
Quote by baylewis
wat the hell is an arpeggio? i've been playing for 2 and half years and never heard of them

...

What? It's just broken chords. Like, playing individual notes of a chord rather than strumming it.
#15
the notes of any given chord played individually
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#16
Quote by Regression
...

What? It's just broken chords. Like, playing individual notes of a chord rather than strumming it.


so playing a g would go
e|--3----------------------------------------3----------------------|
B|-----3-------------------------------------3----------------------|
G|--------0----------------------------------0----------------------|
D|-----------0-------------------------------0----------------------|
A|--------------2----------------------------2----------------------|
E|------------------3------------------------3----------------------|

Sorry, now that i think about i actually do know what they are.

But i've heard someone say rolling in reference to an arpegio, ???
If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all
#17
I have no idea what that would mean, maybe it means like, slide your pick across the strings, like you would when sweep picking. (not that I can sweep pick)
#18
You have made some big assumptions and not asked the right questions.

I often sit with a classical guitar and no pick, however I'm definitely not Segovia.

There is nothing wrong with starting from the beginning, you never know, you might learn something.
#19
Quote by RichieJovie
You have made some big assumptions and not asked the right questions.

I often sit with a classical guitar and no pick, however I'm definitely not Segovia.

There is nothing wrong with starting from the beginning, you never know, you might learn something.

+1 to this, but if he was saying he wanted to teach "piano theory and guitar theory" i would choose not to take the lessons on that basis alone. you and i both know richiejovie that theory is theory, thats like saying "im gonna go learn some clarinet theory, then some cello theory. then next week i'm gonna work on my bass theory." the theory isn't dependent on the instrument.
#20
Quote by Leenix
I'm considering going back to college for Music Courses and i met the head of Musical Department who offered to teach me Music theory for an amount of money per month.

The Professor himself told me i need to do Piano Theory as well which i somehwat doubt.
He later introduced me to his son who teaches music Theory for Guitar. He asked me various questions such as :
- Do you play the Electric Guitar?
- Yes

-Do you use your Fingers to play or do you use a Pick
- ummm i use a pick
When he asked me he was holding a Classic Guitar playing stuff with his fingers when i realised that this man propably had almost nothing to do with electric Guitars.

I mean sure some people RARELY use their fingers on an Electric Guitar to play a style called Fingerpick Rockabilly or so i've heard.
But Why the hell would he ask me a question like : Do you use a pick or your fingers....

I decided not to do any classes there as i would propably end up doing Piano Theory from 0 and Guitar Theory from 0.

I saw a Student there that has been doing guitar lessons for 3 years ( Classic ) and is now doing Arpegios.
I mean 3 YEARS to do arpegios? No thank you.

What do you think?


You seem to know everything already, so what's the point of going to school ?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Oct 10, 2008,
#22
Quote by z4twenny
+1 to this, but if he was saying he wanted to teach "piano theory and guitar theory" i would choose not to take the lessons on that basis alone. you and i both know richiejovie that theory is theory, thats like saying "im gonna go learn some clarinet theory, then some cello theory. then next week i'm gonna work on my bass theory." the theory isn't dependent on the instrument.

It could be the theory of how to actually play the instrument, so piano theory is how to play piano and same with guitar.

Or it could be how to apply the theory.

These are just guesses though, TS?
#23
Quote by z4twenny
+1 to this, but if he was saying he wanted to teach "piano theory and guitar theory" i would choose not to take the lessons on that basis alone. you and i both know richiejovie that theory is theory, thats like saying "im gonna go learn some clarinet theory, then some cello theory. then next week i'm gonna work on my bass theory." the theory isn't dependent on the instrument.


You're not taking it in context. The man is offering lessons on music theory obviously, however I'm sure he's not a master of all instruments he's just saying that it will be on piano.
#24
I think he's just saying we're gonna start with theory using a piano.

Which is not a bad way of doing things at all, I mean, broadening yourself to another instrument and learning general theory. Ya can't miss.
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#25
1. The Piano is very convenient for teaching music theory concepts because of the way the notes are organized. It's also not difficult to translate any theory learned on Piano to the Guitar. The dude will be teaching general ideas of music, so it's not going to be hard to take what you've learned and apply it to guitar playing.

2. While learning classical guitar is not necessarily a hindrance your guitar playing, if you don't want to learn it's perfectly cool as well. Find out exactly what the guy plays though, don't make assumptions. He might also play shred guitar for all you know. Also, the rate of progress is probably dependent on the student in the example you gave. If you really dedicate yourself and progress fast I'm sure that the lessons will move along nicely. One thing to keep in mind though, is that an instructor may try to change some of your guitar habits, which could lead to a strain in the instructor/student relationship if you're not interested in changing them.

My general advice for both situations is to take one or two lessons to get a gauge of things. There's no contract, so just tell them it's not working for you if you don't like the lessons. You know Randy Rhodes used to take lessons all the time, even when he was touring with Ozzy Osbourne. Learning theory and classical guitar might help your music tremendously, but it does require a lot of time a patience.
#26
It would be worth it to learn to play the guitar with your fingers and not just a pick. It will make you a more versatile player. I took classes in college and it was mostly classical guitar and it helped with my overall guitar skills. Finger style is not limited to rockabilly, for example most of Metallica's "Nothing Else Matters" and Seether's "Broken" is played with your fingers. Also, you'll get to learn Harmonic Minor, Melodic Minor, and most of the Modes, and not just how to play them but why and when they work.