#1
Hello UG. I play piano, guitar and clarinet and I know my theory to death

I will be trying out for jazz band in the fall, I am in a dying blues/classic rock band (one rehearsal) , and a jam club that will go nowhere unless we get funding(best school in the state but we cannot afford anothere club)

my guitar teacher is trying to get me into shred and classical music and I want to learn jazz comping, scales, and improvisational tools that might help me in jazz band. He asks me what I have been working on the past week, and I play him something, and he shows me some ways he would play it and get me to learn it.

for the last few weeks, I have been coming in to him with nothing new that I really learned, no new licks, so I showed him some songs I wrote and we end up sight reading and talking about music, gear and other things.

Is it time for another teacher that has a plan for me, or should I come to class with a plan. kinda pissed, dissapointed.


he is having me memorising the dorian and mixolydian scales over the board
#2
Wow, If I was your guitar teacher, and you told me that you wanted to prepare for a jazz band, I would have given you material for learning melodic minor and it's modes.

And then, I would explain to you how we would approach the ii-V-I progression and how cadences work.

And then, let you borrow my Wes Montgomery CD, along with Miles Davis' Kind of Blue album to get your feel on.

And then, the next lesson will be going over the melodic minor scale while vamping/comping over ii-V-I
#3
I know how to Identify ii-V-I and how it works, but I can't Improv over it well.

I will be checking those two CDs out, but I have heard of them

melodic minor is minor up and major down right? I play that for clarrinet alot.

Thank Jugador Santos
#4
Quote by joseph997605
melodic minor is minor up and major down right?
It is not. Ascending, it is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 8 and desdending it is 8 b7 b6 5 4 b3 2 1; however, in modern jazz, the descending pattern is rarely used.
#5
Quote by joseph997605
I know how to Identify ii-V-I and how it works, but I can't Improv over it well.

I will be checking those two CDs out, but I have heard of them

melodic minor is minor up and major down right? I play that for clarrinet alot.

Thank Jugador Santos


No probs man!

here is the harmonic formula for melodic minor:

1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, 7

so basically only the 3rd is flat. So yeah going down is Major in essence.

My fave is Altered Dominant which is the 7th mode of Melodic minor.
#6
Quote by jsantos
so basically only the 3rd is flat. So yeah going down is Major in essence.
No. Please read my post for an accurate description of the melodic minor scale.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
It is not. Ascending, it is 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 8 and desdending it is 8 b7 b6 5 4 b3 2 1; however, in modern jazz, the descending pattern is rarely used.
Not really.

To say that you must play the melodic minor one way ascending and another way descending isnt entirely correct.

First off, to resolve whilst writing minor melodies, you probably should use the major seventh as it resolves really well to the root just about a semitone about it. Yes you can also resolve well by using the major second, but the major seventh works just as well and sometimes better.

If your moving from above the root to the a seventh just below the root, and you want to resolve the melody, you probably should play a major seventh (meaning harmonic minor) instead of a minor seventh. This produces a strong resolution to the root.

If you want to hit that major seventh (so you can resolve to the root) without moving from above the root (so you can move upwards in pitch, not downwards), you probably should use a Major sixth instead of a minor sixth. This is because the augmented second (same as a minor third) step the minor sixth creates with the major seventh is dissonant.

If you dont want to resolve your melody, you should use the minor seventh, as it doesnt resolve as easy.

If you want to play perfect fifth, try to use a minor sixth instead of a major sixth as the minor sixth leads better to the perfect fifth.

If you want to sound eastern, try to play that minor sixth note before or after that major seventh note. For the best effect, dont play a root note and keep that dissonance hanging.

This is why many people consider writing in minor keys more difficult than major keys. The only note out of key note in major melodies that I would use regularly is the #4, as it moves really well to the perfect fifth (which can act like a second root; therefore resolving your melodies)
#8
Quote by jsantos
1, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, 7

so basically only the 3rd is flat. So yeah going down is Major in essence.

My fave is Altered Dominant which is the 7th mode of Melodic minor.

So there's no misunderstanding, I'd call that the Jazz melodic minor, personally.

Grep.
#9
Quote by demonofthenight
Not really.

To say that you must play the melodic minor one way ascending and another way descending isnt entirely correct.


Exactly what I thought. When I learned about the variations of the natural minor scale it was made clear to me that most composers have looked at them not as three separate scales, but as the natural minor scale with two scale degrees that are variable. Even centuries ago composers didn't meticulously obey the ascending and descending rules. It's also a lot simpler to say you're using a natural minor scale with those assumptions in mind than saying you're switching to melodic minor or harmonic minor any time you want to use a #6 or #7.
#10
so basically only the 3rd is flat. So yeah going down is Major in essence.


What? No. It's not even remotely similar to the major scale. The third degree determines tonality.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
To say that you must play the melodic minor one way ascending and another way descending isnt entirely correct.
And I said that.