#1
so, to me, berklee has always seemed like the "holy grail" of contemporary" music schools, and the other day, while bored, i looked up the audition requirements, and this is what it said

* a prepared piece of your choice
* reading (if you can)
* simple form blues
* an optional improvisation over a standard jazz tune or harmonic vamp
* melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic ear training exercises


"reading (if you can)" does this seriously mean what i think it means? that berklee, would consider accepting someone who can't read music??

am i wrong or do these requirements fall short of what a music school should base acceptance on?
#2
No, you need to be able to read. I went through the audition, and it's quite difficult. Notice they don't tell you what kind of thing you'll be sight reading. It's pretty tough.
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#3
Over here in England, it's generally Grade 5 theory/keyboard skill and an A level in Music for music schools. So i think the sight reading is around grade 5 standard. Don't worry about being perfect, you just need to be around that standard.

If you don't know how to read any music notation, learn
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#5
yes, normally sight reading exams involve being given a piece of music and expected to play it on the spot. Generally, wrong notes don't matter, but playing the notated rhythms and articulation/dynamics get the marks
My "Rig":

Fender American Telecaster
Boss OD-2
EHX Small Clone
EHX SMM avec HAZARAI
#6
No, its not a piece, its just like 2 pages of 4 measure rhythms that progressively get harder. They start you out on the first one, and if you get through it was ease they go to a more difficult one.

Its still not easy though...
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#7
When I auditioned for University they just gave me an excerpt for an orchestral work to sight read, I believe it was 16ish measures before they asked me to stop.
#9
Quote by Paquijón
Go to a cheaper school and save yourself from obscene debt by the time you get out of college.

That.

You only get a great education from Berklee if you are at the very top of the class. If not, you'll get subpar education since they don't do gen-ed.
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab
#10
I think the "if you can" is a minimum standard. Kinda like saying you need a bachelors degree to get into med school. The reality is that, given the competition, where everybody else will be head and shoulders above the minimum standard, then you will need to be too.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
Quote by axemanchris
Kinda like saying you need a bachelors degree to get into med school.
Good analogy. I read somewhere that around 30% of all students accepted by Harvard's med school have either Master's degrees or PhDs (or are in pursuit of the degree and will have it by the time they begin their MS-1 year).

In general, if a school application or job application says that something is optional, do it if you can. You will either be doing something that others dismiss as, "Optional, I'm not doing that," as I did on a college application where I was waitlisted and ultimately rejected (happy where I am, though), or it is to sift out the more lazy applicants who don't do it by really requiring it but saying it's optional with the reasoning behind that being that the motivated applicant will do it anyway.

I know nothing about Berklee, but this is good general life info. However, regarding college, I suggest you apply to a regular university and major in music and perhaps pick up a minor or second major in something with a more obvious job opportunity. You get the music, but you also get a good general education which can allow you to get a "real world" job if the music thing doesn't work.

If you simply want to study music because it's interesting but don't see it as your career, I should note that the only requirement for law school is an LSAT score and a Bachelor's degree. Your degree can be in any subject, English literature, math, political science, music composition, or chemical engineering; it doesn't matter as long as you do well. I don't mean to encourage everyone to become a lawyer, but it is an option. However, since you would not be studying the liberal arts or any material relevant to law, you still have to take English and math and social science classes for a Bachelor's degree regardless of your major, I doubt a law school would accept you as a Berklee grad.
#12
well berklee is only one of the places im looking at, im also looking at temple, west chester (i live about an hour from phili) and MI
#13
you need to be excellent in sight reading..
they give you 20minutes or so to prepare...
and thats bad
#14
....and law schools look favourably on disciplines such as music...

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Good advice


Yeah, you want to have a backup plan. I would encourage everyone to follow their dreams, but at some point that house with a yard is going to become very important. And statistically, the chances of making a good living in music is pretty slim.

You just don't want to burn any bridges. And there's certainly nothing wrong with having a good day job, while continuing to pursue your musical goals in your free time. Then if it looks like you could replace the day job with the music job later, thats when you go for it.
In fact this approach can give you a better shot at your goals, because the money from a good day job can pay for gear, studio time, marketing, etc, etc.

Not sure about the law suggestion, though. Most jobs in law feature some pretty brutal hours, and a lot of work at home preparing for stuff. That will pretty much snuff out anything not related to being a lawyer. And the money isn't that great (good, but not great) unless you eventually become a partner somewhere.
Last edited by se012101 at Oct 12, 2008,
#16
Quote by se012101
there's certainly nothing wrong with having a good day job, while continuing to pursue your musical goals in your free time.
Sigged.

Quote by se012101
And the money isn't that great (good, but not great) unless you eventually become a partner somewhere.
If you're at all good, you're going to be making six figures and probably closer to seven.

There are long hours in law, but anyone in a profession that pays well works more than 9-5 for a 40-hour work week. My parents are both in medicine and I jam with them and their colleagues (doctors) all the time. Christ, I've even jammed with residents; they work about 100 hours/week.
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Sigged.


Hehe. I'm flattered.

Quote by bangoodcharlote

If you're at all good, you're going to be making six figures and probably closer to seven.


The national average for all lawyers in the US is something like 95000, though I'm sure the avg is pulled down a bit by guys working in small town practices. Pretty decent unless you live in NYC or LA/SF, etc, but not the sort of money that you can work for 10 yrs and retire on, considering what a demanding profession it is.
To get into the multiple six figures to seven, you usually have to be a partner, at which point you are this 40 year old with a 60 year old's body. A lot of money, for sure, but huge sacrifices are required to get it.

Quote by bangoodcharlote

There are long hours in law, but anyone in a profession that pays well works more than 9-5 for a 40-hour work week. My parents are both in medicine and I jam with them and their colleagues (doctors) all the time. Christ, I've even jammed with residents; they work about 100 hours/week.


True, and I guess if you love something, you will find time regardless (been there, my job has kicked my ass for long stretches at a time, though I think I finally have the hours under control).
#18
Quote by se012101
though I'm sure the avg is pulled down a bit by guys working in small town practices.
As well as a good number of professors, as well as prosecutors and public defenders.

BTW, where did you find that figure?
#19
There was an article a year or two ago on MSN money, that listed the top professions in the US by average salary. The only ones I remember are lawyers, airline pilots (140something), and CEOs (180something, again pulled down by "normal" CEOs).
#20
Quote by se012101
And there's certainly nothing wrong with having a good day job, while continuing to pursue your musical goals in your free time. Then if it looks like you could replace the day job with the music job later, thats when you go for it.


I agree with a lot of the last few posts or so except this. Well... I agree with the sentiment, but if a person wants to 'make it' in music, they're not going to do that while making music a hobby.

I speak from experience. First you get a job. Then you meet a woman and have kids and buy a house. Before you know it, you're in too deep. Your family responsibilities whittle away at your music time to a point where you are down to literally a few hours a week.

My sched looks something like this:

W-F - work. Pick up kids at after school program before six. Make them dinner. Pick up wife at work at 8:00. Have adult time for a few hours before going to bed. On Wednesdays, I have voice students between six and eight. On Thursdays, I teach my kids piano between six and eight. Yeah, I do have to manage to squeeze dinner in there.

Monday, mostly the same except wife only works until 5:30. Tuesdays, wife is off and I have band rehearsal.

Saturday - kids swimming lessons at 8 am. Voice students 12-2. Oldest child's violin lesson at 2:00. Then grocery shopping.

In amidst all that, I have my marking and prep work for my teaching day, union meetings, etc.

It is really hard to make time to write, record, mix, take care of band admin stuff, promotion, etc. within all that.

Oh, sure, it's easy to say, and to an extent, yes, I am managing to do music in my spare time, but 99% of those people who were in bands when they were in their 20's are long done by the time they're 30, and numbers continue to be lost due to that sort of attrition the older you get.

In order to 'make it' in music, you have to be in with both feet. It has to be your full time job, and you have to be devoted to your music before anything else - school, employment, girls, etc. Sure, you can always find an exception, but it is such a competitive thing that the only way to do it is to live it around the clock.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Oct 12, 2008,